Training in a heat-wave

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by Jimbleep, Jun 20, 2005.

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  1. While I'm loving the 32 degree days we're having at the moment - barbeques, scantily clad ladies, and a healthy tan, does anyone have any tips for training in such heat?

    I've read a lot about running on machines having an adverse effect on your running technique and how it isn't really beneficial so while gym's are great for muscle building does anyone know how I can keep my aerobic intensity up without having to nearly kill myself running outside?

    Or maybe I just have to suck it up?
     
  2. I think the most obvious is regular and steady water intake. I have one of those bottles that has a handle that you can hold with fist closed, a lot easier than running with a normal bottle.
     
  3. Simple solution!

    Do your training at 03:00 :)
     
  4. Running at night or early in the morning should stop you from burning up, and keep up your fluid intake. If you are sweating a lot you may need to think about replenishing your bodies natural minerals. There are plenty of isotonic drinks out there, although if you are eating a good balanced diet, you shoudn't really need them.
     
  5. Choose a park with a decent lake to go running around, when you start to get to hot, jump in the lake and swim until you’ve cooled down :)
     
  6. Given the likelyhood of forces personnel going to somewhere hot and doing lots of running around whilst there, take this opportunity to practise at home. :twisted:
     
  7. ^^ :D LOL
     
  8. Possibly things have changed. Bahrain 1966'ish the medics ruled that risks of training in extreme heat outweighed the benefits. Main problem was high level of humidity rather than actual temperature. When things got bad - cannot remember what level this was - units hoisted a Jolly Roger flas and outdoors activities had to cease. Swimming OK of course. They also ran tests on salt replenishment. Stuck a load of PARA on an island. Some salted water, some plain water and some no water. Re-supply supposed to be by RAF. They -as usual - found some reason why they could not fly. Lads had to be rescued by oil company boat and few in very bad state. Final decision was that they should carry two bottles - one fresh and one salted to taste. Blokes to drink as they felt best.
     
  9. OldSnowy

    OldSnowy LE Moderator Book Reviewer

    Apart from the test, I like the idea of abandoning a group of Paras on an Island - well, anywhere really. If we are getting picky, let the crabs return a few weeks later, and the surviving ones (no doubt healthy and well-fed by that time) are surely ideal Paras.
     
  10. swim lots
    aviod the heat and hummity
    keeps ur cadio fitness up
    and has the advantage over running that it is low impact on joints

    i regurally swim as part of my training
     
  11. Physically and scientifically you can still run no matter what the weather or how hot and humid. You must however beaware of the affects this has on your body. Unless you are going to train very early then train in the evening, front load during the day with plenty of fluid and food as normal, chose a circular rouite of a short distance which has a car or house you can run passed frequently and each time you run passed drink some fluid. The advantage of this route is that you get plenty of fluid and short breaks and if you are suffering you can stop anytime without being 4 miles from home or car.

    You could swim instead but you

    a. Need to be a good swimmer swimming a lot of laps at a good old pace to get anything like the return you get from running.
    b. Will burn very badly if its an outdoor pool