Training for Herrick 15

#1
For some time now my Battalion has been training for H15.

This has taken the form mandated by Director, Infantry Employment - DIE. ( surely the most unfortunate acronym in NATO? ) It has seen a good deal of weapon training and shooting, as well as exercises in Urban Operations and Convoy Drills with the Loggies.

This weekend saw a fundamental change in emphasis in that the training was solely for the H15 cohort, and involved docs checks ( no doubt the first of many ); a welfare brief, Hep A jab, C-IED / VALLON; HLS marking, intro to Influence; a presentation from a recently-returned JTAC and a stroll around an airfield in Operational Fitness Test ( OFT ) 3. The medics checked for ears, weighed us and the MO made grown men hop, skip and jump mainly because she could.

What was noticeable to me was the unspoken mood that this was not training for an exercise, it was training for combat operations in Afghanistan. ( OK, the point may have been made a tad vocally by somebody, but it seemed to sink in. )

The future holds time with 4 PARA, a week led by 5RRF as well as in-house stuff. I feel sure that the guys are particularly looking forward to OFT 6, aka ACFT 2 - seperates the boys from the men, and the men from their lunches.

Good weekend.
 
#2
We're in the same boat ops wise and the recent weekends have been in my opinion, very good too.
Although there are a few things I found a bit odd with DIE, like learning how to fortify a western semi detached house which I'm sure we'll be doing loads of in theatre. But hey, it was in the syllabus and as long as there is a tick in the box next to my name....
 
#5
thought so! trying to get out with our lot but being here i m missing all the die stuff so trying to get sorted in other ways!
 
#12
don't forget the doc's infatuation with dangerously low bmi's
I'd noticed that. My quack was spouting that BMI's of 24 to 34 were still seen as medium risk. To get a BMI of 24 at 5'11" I'd have to weigh 172 Lbs, 12 Stone 4lbs or 78Kg. I think I weighed close to that at the age of 18 after 2 weeks on Hospital food........!
 
#13
I'd noticed that. My quack was spouting that BMI's of 24 to 34 were still seen as medium risk. To get a BMI of 24 at 5'11" I'd have to weigh 172 Lbs, 12 Stone 4lbs or 78Kg. I think I weighed close to that at the age of 18 after 2 weeks on Hospital food........!
Its all in the waist size, that's what matters.
BMI says overweight...
Waist size offset = No dramas.

''A BMI measurement is not as accurate if you're an athlete or very muscular (muscle weighs more than fat) as this can push you into a higher BMI category even if you have a healthy level of body fat. It's also not accurate for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding, or people who are frail.''

''Waist circumference is now believed to be a much more accurate measure of future health risk than BMI alone. Carrying too much fat around your middle is associated with an increased risk of developing heart disease and diabetes.''

''Any future for BMI?''
''The emerging research suggesting that BMI is no longer the best predictor of future health problems doesn't mean you should ignore your BMI. It still has some value as a rough screening tool. However, it's become clear that fat deposited around the waist is a more important risk marker.''
 
#14
Our TM mentioned that BMI is a line in the sand - exceed 28 and you will NOT be going.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
#16
Our TM mentioned that BMI is a line in the sand - exceed 28 and you will NOT be going.
Not so. A review of body shape is also carried out with a bit of common sense applied and some gentle advice given to lose a bit of weight if required. After that, all sorts of fat blimps were allowed through the screening system and taken "at risk".
 
#17
Understood, Your Grace; just repeating ( I can say Repeat :) ) what the TM said.

Hope your current location is not tooooooo dull...
 
#20
This weekend saw a Care Under Fire package delivered by 255 Med Reg. More training on use of CAT tourniquet, demo / video of the HEMCON / CELOX stuff thats coming in, practice morphine, bandaging, 9 liners etc. Saturday was classroom based so naturally the weather was glorious. Sunday morning, given we where practicing outside the weather was gash.

Doing the CASEVAC / self aid as a BE was actually very useful as it shows the problems of, for example, having to give first aid and send 9 liners / MIST reports when not in a classroom.

I do feel that the attention levels of those looking to deploy on H15 where somewhat higher than usual, for some reason...
 

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