Train journeys will be a bit duller from now?

Jumper off the Humber Bridge who ended-up on the foreshore on the north bank, was pushed gently back into an ebbing tide so he wound-up downstream in Grimsby's patch.
A probably apocryphal(sp?) tale of a head found on a motorway. Bobby writing report, "Head found in central resarvaytion... resurvasion... kick... verge".

I recall a genuine tale of a motorway bridge jumper who was then run over by several vehicles, including HGVs. Bits were scattered for quite some distance down the motorway. The head was never found. The balance of opinion was that a fox got it from wherever it landed.
 
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We really are breeding an army of retards in this country. Perhaps the dystopian Mad Max future isn’t as far away as we think! :-o
Idiocracy, more like.
 
You go to wash your hands and end up with a sharps injury; at best, a scratch. At worst, Hep B or HIV.
That's the stuff of bloody nightmares. During a restraint of a nasty piece of work (who was rumoured to be HIV+) last year, the fücker tried to bite me. A swift chin check dissuaded him from trying it again.
Dirty smack rat.
 
That's the stuff of bloody nightmares. During a restraint of a nasty piece of work (who was rumoured to be HIV+) last year, the fücker tried to bite me. A swift chin check dissuaded him from trying it again.
Dirty smack rat.
Having received a few bleeding hand and facial injuries a few years back during a very very bloody altercation, and having subsequently done a course of anti-retrovirals, may I advise you to maintain that stance.
ARVs work.
But you have the delightful experience of a month to six weeks of a continual hangover, without the pleasure of drinking.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
You're making a big assumption, that it was the front of the train/engine that did the deal.

If it was a 12-car unit, then you have a quarter of a mile of under-carriage boxes etc. to look between and if it was freight, then you'll be lucky to find anything that resembles a human. Having dealt with a few of the under-not in front of type of kills, it really is guess the body part, or indeed if it is actually human. In these cases, the driver would know nothing about it, until he/she gets told by Control or the Signal Box. He/she could even have berthed up and clocked off without knowing.

A woman walked into Clayton Tunnel (just up from Brighton) and was was hit by a down fast (express). It went like this....train side -> wall -> train side -> wall -> train side -> wall -> under train and ripped apart. Driver only heard the initial bang and one more. The passengers - especially those on that side - heard it all.

Another woman at Hassocks, decided that she'd jump in front of another down fast and was truly fucked up. This one happened as the platforms were full of kids going home from school. The flower tributes left, were in two places along the platform, as no-one seemed to know which was the main bit of her remains.
Clayton tunnel nearly did for me about 28 years ago. In those days we did track circuit maintenance in traffic, so into a mile and a bit long tunnel in two pairs knowing there was a refuge every 22 yards. about a 1/4 of the way in was a big refuge with location cases housing the equipment in.
Now you can no longer (at last) work in a tunnel in traffic even under emergencies, and looking out is insane. Its dark, there is a pinprick of light at the end and you are trying to work out the speed and distance.
Anyway the lads are in the equipment cases and I felt the air pressure change as a unit entered the tunnel. Thick clouds of diesel fumes accompanied this engine which didn't seem to be pulling any wagons. I warned the lads and stood at the edge to keep them in.
Train goes by spewing fumes and clouds of smoke, I let the loco go past and peeked out just in time to see the uprights on flatbeds whizz past my snozzer!
I certainly didn't do that again!
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
We really are breeding an army of retards in this country. Perhaps the dystopian Mad Max future isn’t as far away as we think! :-o
Some of the stunts I saw pulled when I was maintenance manager in Croydon defy belief!
 
Worked on a preserved railway for a while. Speed limit only 40mph in those days.
It's bl**dy tedious cleaning sheep remains off outside Walschaerts valve gear.
 
Clayton tunnel nearly did for me about 28 years ago. In those days we did track circuit maintenance in traffic, so into a mile and a bit long tunnel in two pairs knowing there was a refuge every 22 yards. about a 1/4 of the way in was a big refuge with location cases housing the equipment in.
Now you can no longer (at last) work in a tunnel in traffic even under emergencies, and looking out is insane. Its dark, there is a pinprick of light at the end and you are trying to work out the speed and distance.
Anyway the lads are in the equipment cases and I felt the air pressure change as a unit entered the tunnel. Thick clouds of diesel fumes accompanied this engine which didn't seem to be pulling any wagons. I warned the lads and stood at the edge to keep them in.
Train goes by spewing fumes and clouds of smoke, I let the loco go past and peeked out just in time to see the uprights on flatbeds whizz past my snozzer!
I certainly didn't do that again!
If it's any consolation, the driver would more than likely not have seen you until he was upon you. The "headlights" are purely for the train to be seen and not an aid to the driver's forward vision. As you said, the air pressure change is what alerted you and not any noise from the engine. Singing rails help too.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
If it's any consolation, the driver would more than likely not have seen you until he was upon you. The "headlights" are purely for the train to be seen and not an aid to the driver's forward vision. As you said, the air pressure change is what alerted you and not any noise from the engine. Singing rails help too.
In those days very few trains had headlights, we used to look for the illuminated headcode bit to see them after dark.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
How we didn't have more killed is down to experienced staff. In the year that they introduced dead serious about safety the department (S&T) lost 8 men nationally. Bear in mind that we were the smallest department (to have staff working lineside, URFDO/NDT don't count) and only had 2000 staff that worked lineside daily.
 
ISWYDT - Night Mail?
Almost correct. " The gradients against her , but she's on time" from the film Night Mail. Made in 1936, the same year as the "Battle of cable street" An iconic and wonderful film made by the GPO, and featuring the Traveling post office, from london to Edinburgh. Music by Brittan, and words by W.H. Auden, if you are a train buff, this rates as the very best of films on the subject.
 

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