Tracing a WW1 soldier when I have virtually no information

Trilby

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
#42
Here you go mate:- Pte H Ackroyd Reg No 2034 Manchester Regiment, we've got his 1914-15 Star and his Victory Medal but unfortunately not his BWM. TIA
I've checked the SWB roll via two sites and also looked again at his MIC: as you say, no sign of SWB. Also his papers say discharged upon termination of his engagement, under paragraph 392 xxi of King's Regulations, which they wouldn't do if he had been discharged physically unfit (and thus entitled to apply for the SWB)
 
#43
I've checked the SWB roll via two sites and also looked again at his MIC: as you say, no sign of SWB. Also his papers say discharged upon termination of his engagement, under paragraph 392 xxi of King's Regulations, which they wouldn't do if he had been discharged physically unfit (and thus entitled to apply for the SWB)
Have you got a date of discharge by any chance mate?
 
#44
He appears to have been born around October 1894 in Portsea. By 1911, as noted above, he was a gardener. Your contacts at the NHM will be able to interpret it better but the sources about Lepidoptery(sp?) online seem to suggest he was interested in butterflies before the war. Enlisting in September 1914, he must have been a capable man, as the 1914-15 Star roll shows he went overseas as Sergeant, having been in the army less than a year. In or around July 1919 Austin A Tullett married Nellie D Wood in Blean in Kent. In 1931 Nellie Dorothy Tullett petitioned for divorce, however she and Austin were still living together, by now at 5 Boashurst Rd. N. Wall, Fareham, Hampshire, in 1939. His occupation was Government Clerk.

A A Tullett died in Gosport around April 1967.
Trilby, I take my hat off to you. And the very impressive Team ARRSE response.
 

Trilby

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
#47
Harry Ackroyd enlisted on 19 August 1914, aged 26 years three months. He was embodied and posted to the 10th (Oldham) Battalion, the Manchester Regiment, a Territorial formation. He gave his next of kin as his wife, Lily Ackroyd (née Burslem(?)), of 117 Honeywell Lane, Oldham. At the time of enlistment they had one daughter (?) Florence (?) Ackroyd, born 18 December 1910, and baptised at Oldham on 18 January 1911, Rev Stopford officiating. Having enlisted on 19 August 1914, he went out to join the Egyptian Expeditionary Force on 10 September 1914. He was slightly wounded with the Egyptian/Mediterranean Expeditionary Force - being reported as wounded in the War Office Daily Casualty List for 6 July 1915 - and left for home on 16 July 1915. This would suggest that he was probably wounded at Gallipoli, whence the battalion had gone in mid-May (5 May is given as his date of entry into the theatre of war on his Medal Index Card). Given an average lag of time of one month between a man being wounded and appearing on the list, this would suggest that he may have been wounded in the Battalion's attack on Krithia on 4 June. He remained on the strength at home until 17 May 1916, when he was discharged upon termination of his engagement, under paragraph 392 xxi of King's Regulations. For his service he was entitled to the Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal.

He drops off my radar after that. Would guess he went into a reserved occupation.
 
#48
Seems very possible. Unfortunately I don't believe his service records survive to check and he doesn't seem to be in any of the preserved hospital records (although those are only a fraction of the ones created). It would explain why he didn't appear in the daily casualty lists.
Perhaps you will know that any WW1 Soldier who applied for or received a war pension had their documents stored until 7 or 8 years ago in Edinburgh. The Gov archives were unable to continue to store them and they were handed to the Western Front Association who will sell copies for a small fee, I had have had two sets, very interesting and very detailed.
WWW.Westernfrontassociation.com ,
 
#49
Harry Ackroyd enlisted on 19 August 1914, aged 26 years three months. He was embodied and posted to the 10th (Oldham) Battalion, the Manchester Regiment, a Territorial formation. He gave his next of kin as his wife, Lily Ackroyd (née Burslem(?)), of 117 Honeywell Lane, Oldham. At the time of enlistment they had one daughter (?) Florence (?) Ackroyd, born 18 December 1910, and baptised at Oldham on 18 January 1911, Rev Stopford officiating. Having enlisted on 19 August 1914, he went out to join the Egyptian Expeditionary Force on 10 September 1914. He was slightly wounded with the Egyptian/Mediterranean Expeditionary Force - being reported as wounded in the War Office Daily Casualty List for 6 July 1915 - and left for home on 16 July 1915. This would suggest that he was probably wounded at Gallipoli, whence the battalion had gone in mid-May (5 May is given as his date of entry into the theatre of war on his Medal Index Card). Given an average lag of time of one month between a man being wounded and appearing on the list, this would suggest that he may have been wounded in the Battalion's attack on Krithia on 4 June. He remained on the strength at home until 17 May 1916, when he was discharged upon termination of his engagement, under paragraph 392 xxi of King's Regulations. For his service he was entitled to the Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal.

He drops off my radar after that. Would guess he went into a reserved occupation.
That's fantastic mate, were the SWB's awarded retrospectively?
 

Trilby

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
#50
Overopensights - yes, they are a very valuable resource, I think I was alerted to them by this site. They have now been digitised in partnership with Ancestry and basic information can be accessed with a standard subscription (to see the ledgers/cards themselves their premium Fold 3 Subscription is needed)

Bosscat - that's a very good question. They would have to have been retrospective in the sense that you qualified for them by being discharged, etc, but I am not sure when they stopped being issued. Early 1920s, when they & a number of other WW1 distinctions (such as wound stripes and service chevrons) were prohibited would seem a good bet.
 
Last edited:
#51
I’ve been reading the war diary. Fascinating. On 10th August 1916 Sgt Tullett was accidentally wounded while instructing in rapid loading. A Private Woolley had negligently discharged his rifle, causing the injury. Woolley was subsequently tried by Court martial and given 7 days Field Punishment. I wonder if it was this that evenually led to Tullett’s discharge as physically unfit the following October?
My paternal grandfather suffered a similar injury, shooting himself in the arm while buttoning the breech cover having reloaded after inspection. He was CM'd and got 41 days FP No 1. I suppose I should be grateful. The Pl Comd and two of the three witnesses didn't make it.
 
#52
Overopensights - yes, they are s very valuable resource, I think I was alerted to them by this site. They have now been digitised in partnership with Ancestry and basic information can be accessed with a standard subscription (to see the ledgers/cards themselves their premium Fold 3 Subscription is needed)

Bosscat - that's a very good question. They would have to have been retrospective in the sense that you qualified for them by being discharged, etc, but I am not sure when they stopped being issued. Early 1920s, when they & a number of other WW1 distinctions (such as wound stripes and service chevrons) were prohibited would seem a good bet.
Would there be a way of checking if it had been applied for? and if not would next of kin be eligible to apply for it this day and age? By the way sorry for all the questions.
 
#53
More amazing work from ARRSE!
But also amazing that, while in a war zone, with shot and shell flying, the chap made the effort to catch and preserve the butterfly.
That was my thought too.
 
#54
Perhaps you will know that any WW1 Soldier who applied for or received a war pension had their documents stored until 7 or 8 years ago in Edinburgh. The Gov archives were unable to continue to store them and they were handed to the Western Front Association who will sell copies for a small fee, I had have had two sets, very interesting and very detailed.
WWW.Westernfrontassociation.com ,
Does something similar exist for the Navy? ISTR that their records were destroyed by the Luftwaffe but I'd like to find out more about one of my grandparents.
 
#55
More amazing work from ARRSE!
But also amazing that, while in a war zone, with shot and shell flying, the chap made the effort to catch and preserve the butterfly.
A vegan replies:
Not only did this khaki clad brute capture such a beautiful creature, no doubt enticed by the dregs of a tin of plum and apple jam, he then impaled it on a symbol of whiteman's brutality to all , a phallic pin which symbolises the slave trade in the smaller workshops of the Empire at the time.
Soya nectar anyone?
 
#56
Does something similar exist for the Navy? ISTR that their records were destroyed by the Luftwaffe but I'd like to find out more about one of my grandparents.
Officer or rating? You might try Royal Museums Greenwich - First World War Lives at Sea. It's a free and flexible resource using transcriptions of service records held by TNA. You can search Royal Navy officers and ratings who served during WWI, as well as crews on different ships and at different battles during the war.

Royal Navy - First World War - Lives at sea

The National Archives Royal Navy ratings’ service records 1853-1928, "contain over 700,000 Royal Navy service records for ratings who served between 1853 and 1928". Some of the records extend to 1950. Some of the records are not searchable by name and, for searching by service numbers, they recommend entering the number only, leaving out any letters.

Also see: Tracing your Royal Navy Family History and Where to find Royal Navy Service Records (IWM).
 
#57
Perhaps you will know that any WW1 Soldier who applied for or received a war pension had their documents stored until 7 or 8 years ago in Edinburgh. The Gov archives were unable to continue to store them and they were handed to the Western Front Association who will sell copies for a small fee, I had have had two sets, very interesting and very detailed.
WWW.Westernfrontassociation.com ,
I tried the Royal West Kent Museum Researcher for info about Grandad (survived) and his cousin (still in Arras).

£15 per name for the search, which revealed nothing I didn't know already but suggested I buy a book from them.

Perhaps I will try the Western Front Association next. Thanks for the tip.
 
#58
Officer or rating? You might try Royal Museums Greenwich - First World War Lives at Sea. It's a free and flexible resource using transcriptions of service records held by TNA. You can search Royal Navy officers and ratings who served during WWI, as well as crews on different ships and at different battles during the war.

Royal Navy - First World War - Lives at sea

The National Archives Royal Navy ratings’ service records 1853-1928, "contain over 700,000 Royal Navy service records for ratings who served between 1853 and 1928". Some of the records extend to 1950. Some of the records are not searchable by name and, for searching by service numbers, they recommend entering the number only, leaving out any letters.

Also see: Tracing your Royal Navy Family History and Where to find Royal Navy Service Records (IWM).
Many thanks. I think he was on an armed trawler and sunk at least once but it's coming down through non-military family filters. We do know he was an Auxiliary during WW2 but that's about it.
 
#59
If the 7th Queen's were at Maricourt, you've found your man.
Not for 1 July 1916. The sector was held by 30th Division.
 
#60
Does something similar exist for the Navy? ISTR that their records were destroyed by the Luftwaffe but I'd like to find out more about one of my grandparents.
Try the Western Front association, they may be able to help. I will reiterate though, the Medical docs are for pensioned soldiers or those that applied. One set of Docs that I had from them had entries up until 1936, when the particular soldier received a lump sum of £40.
 

Similar threads


Top