Tracing a WW1 soldier when I have virtually no information

#22
Silver War Badge means he was invalided out after being wounded . . .
Not necessarily because of wounds, chap: Kings Regs para 392 ch XVI tells us ' No longer physically fit for war service.'

This would take into account those men who failed to complete initial training because of the discovery of a hidden ailment or disability through to those men severely wounded in action.

. . . and, yes, it also included those discharged with chronic syphilis.
 
#25
That is what many people understand, however it was also awarded to those who had been discharged owing to sickness.In fact, for a man who fell sick in the UK and was discharged without going overseas, it could be the only sign that they had 'done their bit'. I wish I had any WW1 medals or similar for my family - sadly they have all disappeared.
Thak you for the additional info
You might get lucky and find your ancestor’s medal card ad be able to get replicas made. I did that with my grandad but fortunately great gradads original medals cap badgesd SWB came into my possession when my aunt died
 
#29
My wife's Gt Grandad was casevaced from Gallipoli, I did download his MIC years ago but I've no idea where I put it, but I don't remember a reference to the award of the SWB.
 

Trilby

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
#30
My wife's Gt Grandad was casevaced from Gallipoli, I did download his MIC years ago but I've no idea where I put it, but I don't remember a reference to the award of the SWB.
Was he definitely discharged as physically unfit? If he recovered and was subsequently discharged in the normal way, he would not have been entitled. He also may not have applied - unlike campaign medals to other ranks, SWBs were not issued but had to be applied for.

Sometimes Discharge Cards were doubled up to use as Medal Index Cards. They are searchable as MICs and do include details of the SWB Roll but in quite an opaque fashion, as against a line entitled 'Action taken' it simply says 'List/[letter - indicating Infantry Record office]/[number - indicating page on Roll]'. As such it's easy to miss.
 
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#32
Arrse is more than brilliant! I am always amazed by the collective know-how and knowledge of members. And their willingness to help.

Thanks to all who have contributed, I am most grateful to you for your interest and your willingness to investigate and to share your knowledge.

This is the specimen by the way, one of 13 million held in the bowels of the Natural History Museum. View attachment 403450
It's thankfully not all trolls and politics; ARRSErs include some real stars. That's besides the Arrsepedia Genealogy Category,
https://www.arrse.co.uk/wiki/Category:Military_Genealogy

It appears that ARRSE has some of the best military genealogy and family research wikis on the Internet,.
 
#33
Arrse is more than brilliant! I am always amazed by the collective know-how and knowledge of members. And their willingness to help.

Thanks to all who have contributed, I am most grateful to you for your interest and your willingness to investigate and to share your knowledge.

This is the specimen by the way, one of 13 million held in the bowels of the Natural History Museum. View attachment 403450

Sgt Tullett may well also have saved that butterfly from being blown to pieces in the next German bombardment.





..........Doh ! .........
 
#34
Silver War Badge means he was invalided out after being wounded - They gave you a badge to wear to stop ladies in big hats giving you a white feather for not being in uniform. I have my great grandfathers SWB - he got in the way of a shell splinter in '17 - not so much the bullet with his name on as a bit of hot metal marked 'to whom it may concern'
I’ve been reading the war diary. Fascinating. On 10th August 1916 Sgt Tullett was accidentally wounded while instructing in rapid loading. A Private Woolley had negligently discharged his rifle, causing the injury. Woolley was subsequently tried by Court martial and given 7 days Field Punishment. I wonder if it was this that evenually led to Tullett’s discharge as physically unfit the following October?
 

Trilby

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
#35
I’ve been reading the war diary. Fascinating. On 10th August 1916 Sgt Tullett was accidentally wounded while instructing in rapid loading. A Private Woolley had negligently discharged his rifle, causing the injury. Woolley was subsequently tried by Court martial and given 7 days Field Punishment. I wonder if it was this that evenually led to Tullett’s discharge as physically unfit the following October?
Seems very possible. Unfortunately I don't believe his service records survive to check and he doesn't seem to be in any of the preserved hospital records (although those are only a fraction of the ones created). It would explain why he didn't appear in the daily casualty lists.
 
#36
Sgt Tullett may well also have saved that butterfly from being blown to pieces in the next German bombardment.
..........Doh ! .........
This has been a superb thread and I do not wish to detract from the work of the key contributors but slightly off thread there is this poignant portrayal of the dangers of admiring Butterflies st the end of the WW1 classic " All Quiet on the Western Front " .... linky ...


... back on thread .
 
#37
#38
Probably by way of an end-note to the thread, I would like to thank all those who have researched and provided information. It has been fantastic what you have discovered. I have distilled it into a summary and sent it off to the chap at the museum. Turns out that they had a researcher who had been working on it and had discovered some of the biographical stuff already, but not the stuff in the war diaries, or (perhaps surprisingly) some of the stuff about his work as an entomologist/collector. They were most grateful. Thanks all.

The thread has been brilliant. It is amazing what a variety of wonderful, interesting and able people we have here on Arrse (amongst the poo poo heads of course!). All those who have contributed here are definitely of the wonderful variety, rather than the poo poo head type! Thanks again.
 
#39
Was he definitely discharged as physically unfit? If he recovered and was subsequently discharged in the normal way, he would not have been entitled. He also may not have applied - unlike campaign medals to other ranks, SWBs were not issued but had to be applied for.

Sometimes Discharge Cards were doubled up to use as Medal Index Cards. They are searchable as MICs and do include details of the SWB Roll but in quite an opaque fashion, as against a line entitled 'Action taken' it simply says 'List/[letter - indicating Infantry Record office]/[number - indicating page on Roll]'. As such it's easy to miss.
I think so mate, I could give you some details if you fancy having a look sometime?
 

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