Tory 2020 manifesto considerations:Scrap 0.7% FA,create 3% security pledge.

Debenham

Old-Salt
Aid pledge may be ditched to boost defence spending

Highlights.
Note:These are all just proposals at the present time, the first however was advised by the defence select committee.
  • 0.7% Foreign Aid pledge to be scrapped, folded into 3% national security pledge. Enabling MOD some authority over DFID. Some form of substantial MOD budget increase likely, but would that do anything more than covering up £10 Billion shortfall?
  • Fixed Term Parliament Act to be scrapped under the premise that it's creation was undemocratic.
  • Triple Pension lock to be thrown to the wind, conservatives confident this won't cause problems with old voters because Corbyn is not a threat.

Full article text below.
Cabinet ministers are plotting to axe Britain’s pledge to spend 0.7% of national income on foreign aid so they can promise in the next Tory election manifesto to divert more cash to the armed forces.

Under sweeping plans being mapped out for 2020, Downing Street also wants to scrap the Fixed Term Parliaments Act, which sets the time between general elections at five years and robs prime ministers of the freedom to call a vote at a time of their choosing.

Senior Conservatives say a decision has also been taken “in principle” to scrap the pensions “triple lock” guarantee because it is too expensive.

All three proposals are likely to generate significant opposition but are under consideration for the manifesto if the Tories remain in a commanding position in the polls and are confident they can take bold measures.

They have been discussed by several cabinet ministers in recent weeks as part of “blue sky thinking” ahead of the next election.Under one plan being advanced, the law guaranteeing that 0.7% of national income is spent on aid would be replaced with one guaranteeing that a total of 3% was spent on “security” instead.

At the same time, ministers would drum up international support for a change in the definition of aid spending — rules policed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development — so that aid money could be diverted to pay for non-aggressive military spending where Britain has a security interest.

“We need to spend more aid money in fragile African states where instability leads to large numbers of migrants or the spread of extremism and terrorism to Europe,” said one minister.

The Department for International Development (DfID) already spends half its budget in so-called fragile states but ministers believe there is an appetite in other countries dealing with the migration crisis to redraw the rules so more can be spent on military operations to support refugees.

A 3% security pledge — which has been advanced by the defence select committee — would go further than the 2% currently committed to defence spending and would allow the Ministry of Defence to share more funds with DfID.

Tearing up the aid pledge is regarded as popular with working-class voters who voted to leave in the EU referendum and whom May is hoping to lure away from Ukip and Labour in 2020, but it will be met with resistance from Priti Patel, the international development secretary, who believes the pledge is a key to the UK’s “global Britain” brand after Brexit.

Officials in the Downing Street policy unit and the Conservative research department are beginning to look at options for the manifesto so that policies can be road-tested.

Downing Street is adamant that the prime minister has no intention of calling an election before 2020 — because she believes it will be disruptive and because she has pledged not to do so.

But her closest advisers want more flexibility after 2020. They believe the fixed-term act is the worst piece of legislation introduced by David Cameron, her predecessor.

“It was constitutional change with long-lasting effect that was basically designed to protect the coalition,” a senior No 10 source said. “That’s a bad reason to play around with the constitution . . . It’s really un-British.”

There is also support in the Treasury and the Department for Work and Pensions for the abolition of the triple-lock pensions pledge — which guarantees pensioners an annual rise in line with inflation, the increase in average earnings, or 2.5%, whichever is highest. In conversations with external experts, Conservative advisers have said the triple lock is “too expensive” and will be scrapped in the manifesto.

“The Tories have said to me they’re looking at it. They think it’s unaffordable. They think we’ve got the cover to drop it,” a well-placed Westminster source said. “They believe that ‘old people vote for us. They’re not going to turn away. They’re not going to vote for Corbyn’. They’re going to drop it.”

Tim Farron, the Lib Dem leader, said: “These suggestions seem like a right-wing MP’s dream. They have waited for a generation for this kind of plan — slashing aid and trying to stop the world as they want to get off. But it feels like we are only a lurid pinstripe blazer away from John Redwood’s fantasy cabinet.”

A government spokesman said it was “speculation” to predict the manifesto and added: “We take our international responsibilities seriously and remain fully committed to them.”


Sorry if this has been posted elsewhere, I looked but couldn't see it.
 

Border-Reiver

Old-Salt
Seems sensible and would hopefully lead to a more coherent approach to foreign relations across various government departments.

What?? A man can dream!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Aid pledge may be ditched to boost defence spending

Highlights.
Note:These are all just proposals at the present time, the first however was advised by the defence select committee.
  • 0.7% Foreign Aid pledge to be scrapped, folded into 3% national security pledge. Enabling MOD some authority over DFID. Some form of substantial MOD budget increase likely, but would that do anything more than covering up £10 Billion shortfall?
  • Fixed Term Parliament Act to be scrapped under the premise that it's creation was undemocratic.
  • Triple Pension lock to be thrown to the wind, conservatives confident this won't cause problems with old voters because Corbyn is not a threat.

Full article text below.
Cabinet ministers are plotting to axe Britain’s pledge to spend 0.7% of national income on foreign aid so they can promise in the next Tory election manifesto to divert more cash to the armed forces.

Under sweeping plans being mapped out for 2020, Downing Street also wants to scrap the Fixed Term Parliaments Act, which sets the time between general elections at five years and robs prime ministers of the freedom to call a vote at a time of their choosing.

Senior Conservatives say a decision has also been taken “in principle” to scrap the pensions “triple lock” guarantee because it is too expensive.

All three proposals are likely to generate significant opposition but are under consideration for the manifesto if the Tories remain in a commanding position in the polls and are confident they can take bold measures.

They have been discussed by several cabinet ministers in recent weeks as part of “blue sky thinking” ahead of the next election.Under one plan being advanced, the law guaranteeing that 0.7% of national income is spent on aid would be replaced with one guaranteeing that a total of 3% was spent on “security” instead.

At the same time, ministers would drum up international support for a change in the definition of aid spending — rules policed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development — so that aid money could be diverted to pay for non-aggressive military spending where Britain has a security interest.

“We need to spend more aid money in fragile African states where instability leads to large numbers of migrants or the spread of extremism and terrorism to Europe,” said one minister.

The Department for International Development (DfID) already spends half its budget in so-called fragile states but ministers believe there is an appetite in other countries dealing with the migration crisis to redraw the rules so more can be spent on military operations to support refugees.

A 3% security pledge — which has been advanced by the defence select committee — would go further than the 2% currently committed to defence spending and would allow the Ministry of Defence to share more funds with DfID.

Tearing up the aid pledge is regarded as popular with working-class voters who voted to leave in the EU referendum and whom May is hoping to lure away from Ukip and Labour in 2020, but it will be met with resistance from Priti Patel, the international development secretary, who believes the pledge is a key to the UK’s “global Britain” brand after Brexit.

Officials in the Downing Street policy unit and the Conservative research department are beginning to look at options for the manifesto so that policies can be road-tested.

Downing Street is adamant that the prime minister has no intention of calling an election before 2020 — because she believes it will be disruptive and because she has pledged not to do so.

But her closest advisers want more flexibility after 2020. They believe the fixed-term act is the worst piece of legislation introduced by David Cameron, her predecessor.

“It was constitutional change with long-lasting effect that was basically designed to protect the coalition,” a senior No 10 source said. “That’s a bad reason to play around with the constitution . . . It’s really un-British.”

There is also support in the Treasury and the Department for Work and Pensions for the abolition of the triple-lock pensions pledge — which guarantees pensioners an annual rise in line with inflation, the increase in average earnings, or 2.5%, whichever is highest. In conversations with external experts, Conservative advisers have said the triple lock is “too expensive” and will be scrapped in the manifesto.

“The Tories have said to me they’re looking at it. They think it’s unaffordable. They think we’ve got the cover to drop it,” a well-placed Westminster source said. “They believe that ‘old people vote for us. They’re not going to turn away. They’re not going to vote for Corbyn’. They’re going to drop it.”

Tim Farron, the Lib Dem leader, said: “These suggestions seem like a right-wing MP’s dream. They have waited for a generation for this kind of plan — slashing aid and trying to stop the world as they want to get off. But it feels like we are only a lurid pinstripe blazer away from John Redwood’s fantasy cabinet.”

A government spokesman said it was “speculation” to predict the manifesto and added: “We take our international responsibilities seriously and remain fully committed to them.”


Sorry if this has been posted elsewhere, I looked but couldn't see it.
Apart from the fact pensioners are more likely to vote for some party that does not bin the triple lock?
 
Scrapping foreign aid would be very radical and I admire the proposal however I doubt will get final approval.

Reducing foreign aid or capping it at 0.2% shows the UK is still doing its bit and increasing other budgets (albeit small) would be more pragmatic and achievable.

Who says JC will be Labour leader at the same time if the Union's get their way.
 
The Triple Lock for pensions was only to 2020 in any event. Hopefully now they'll get rid of this "Space age" buzzword and use a down to earth description such as "In line with inflation" or somesuch. I think my increase this year was around £3 weekly, eaten up by my council tax thingy, so thank god I prepared for old age long ago...and they still grab 20% tax after personal allowances so I'm probably paying for my own pension increaseanyway. And though JC may be unelectable now, who knows what may occur in 2020. :cool:
 
Seems sensible and would hopefully lead to a more coherent approach to foreign relations across various government departments.

What?? A man can dream!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

In that case, the MoD and DfID shoulbd work for the FCO.

Look at the US problems between State and Defense for a comparator...
 

Himmler74

On ROPS
On ROPs
I'm surprised our reporter in the baltics has not suggested a full re-armament programmer to protect his current employment. He also has plans to retire back "home" to enjoy the benefits he hasn't paid into.
 

Debenham

Old-Salt
Apart from the fact pensioners are more likely to vote for some party that does not bin the triple lock?

Depends on the other policies. If Corbyn is gone that could be a problem but if he stays the Tories can pretty much do whatever they want. And I can't imagine how the Lib Dems could nab the old vote.
 
Depends on the other policies. If Corbyn is gone that could be a problem but if he stays the Tories can pretty much do whatever they want. And I can't imagine how the Lib Dems could nab the old vote.
I know anything could happen. "A week is a long time etc etc!"
 
Philip Hammond, the Chancellor, has already indicated that the law requiring 0.7 per cent of GNI to be spent on aid will be reviewed before 2020, as part of a re-examination of all areas of spending.

However, Mrs May, however, has made it clear that she is a supporter of the 0.7 per cent spending pledge and remains “fully committed” to it.

£13Bn or at least £10Bn of that figure is a significant amount that could easily be focused on 'homegrown' departments which are facing severe economic reductions, £3Bn is still a fair amount of foreign aid it just means the DfiD would review its priorities.

Cabinet split opens up over foreign aid spending
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
RIP
Ring-fencing the squandering of money overseas while cutting Defence is what still puts me off the Conservatives. I was born a Tory and I'll die a Tory but ever since Major showed his true colours as a liberal wet I haven't a pukka Tory party to vote for.
 

Yokel

LE
Any chance any of the parties could commit to making policy decision based on evidence?
 
Any chance any of the parties could commit to making policy decision based on evidence?
They do that. Both parties follow a formula of 'public sector bad, private sector good' (and vice versa) for all decision making

Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk
 
I'd be surprised if there is a quantifiable metric that shows the value of 'soft power' that can be compared to military effect. On neither of my HERRICK tours was I aware building a bridge or school for a village turned them into a bulwark of wily and vicious Pathans who secured our left flank against the Taliban. Neither am I aware that the presence of thousands of sacks of grain with a Union Flag and 'British Aid' written on the side being pumped into darkest Africa, has left its citizens less likely to allow themselves to be radicalised when arriving in our green and pleasant lands.
 
Ring-fencing the squandering of money overseas while cutting Defence is what still puts me off the Conservatives. I was born a Tory and I'll die a Tory but ever since Major showed his true colours as a liberal wet I haven't a pukka Tory party to vote for.

A lot of us feel the same. It is issues like this that UKIP should hijack and continue to be a pressure group/thorn in the side of the Tories. Their thinking doesn't have to be particularly polished, just populist, so that the other parties have to take notice.
 

Latest Threads

Top