Torture techniques taught at Chicksands

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#1
Torture techniques taught at Chicksands

01 May 2008
By Catherine Varney

British troops who used banned torture methods on Iraqi prisoners were '100 per cent Chicksands' - it was claimed this week.

The Joint Committee on Human Rights heard on Tuesday from leading human rights solicitor Phil Shiner that the soldiers carrying out these torture methods were trained at the Defence Intelligence and Security Centre at Chicksands. (DISC)

Five techniques, branded 'inhumane,' that Mr Shiner said were taught at the Mid Beds DISC base included hooding, forcing detainees into stressful positions, sleep depravation, food deprivation, and noise.

A spokesman for the Ministry of Defence said: ""During both tactical questioning and interrogator training courses, students are taught their legal obligations under domestic and international law, including the Geneva Conventions, additional protocols and the European Convention on Human Rights.

"This is applied defence-wide with one dedicated tri-service training programme delivered by the Defence Intelligence and Security Centre. (DISC)

"Students are assessed during the course on the understanding and application of these principles.

"The procedures of the Armed Forces body that undertakes interrogation are conducted entirely within UK domestic and international law.

"UK training and guidance applies to all UK tactical questioning and Interrogation operations irrespective of the theatre."

Mr Shiner adressed MPs and members of the House and Lords saying: "The information I have is evidence in the court martial where you get the finger pointed at Chicksands.

"A Colonel Baker says that he was told that what was going on, hooding and stressing was, quote: '100 per cent Chicksands'.

http://www.bedfordtoday.co.uk/news/Torture-techniques-taught-at-Chicksands.4042852.jp
 
#2
At least there is no mention of 'waterboarding' - not a torture method at all, unless you are the one it is being done to. :wink:

The question is, whom do you believe here?
 
#4
#5
I've heard of quite a few inhumane techniques at Chicksands..............




...............mainly from the instructors!




Is that my coat?

Thankyou.

TAXI!
 
#7
Aren't those all fairly mild interrogation techniques with the exception of food deprivation? I agree with all of those methods anyway, but why don't these people concentrate on places like Langley where such techniques, and worse, are definitely being taught?
 
#9
I suppose Mr. Shiner is referring to these provisions (and others) under the Geneva Convention:

Article 3, section C
"...the following acts are and shall remain prohibited at any time and in any place whatsoever..."
"(c) Outrages upon personal dignity, in particular, humiliating and degrading treatment;"


Article 13
"Likewise, prisoners of war must at all times be protected, particularly against acts of violence or intimidation and against insults and public curiosity."

Article 17
"No physical or mental torture, nor any other form of coercion, may be inflicted on prisoners of war to secure from them information of any kind whatever. Prisoners of war who refuse to answer may not be threatened, insulted, or exposed to any unpleasant or disadvantageous treatment of any kind."
 
#10
Unfortunately the techniques were banned by the PM in the 70s when it came out they were used against PIRA suspects.

No further comment

Ish.
 
#12
redgrain said:
I suppose Mr. Shiner is referring to these provisions (and others) under the Geneva Convention:

Article 3, section C
"...the following acts are and shall remain prohibited at any time and in any place whatsoever..."
"(c) Outrages upon personal dignity, in particular, humiliating and degrading treatment;"


Article 13
"Likewise, prisoners of war must at all times be protected, particularly against acts of violence or intimidation and against insults and public curiosity."

Article 17
"No physical or mental torture, nor any other form of coercion, may be inflicted on prisoners of war to secure from them information of any kind whatever. Prisoners of war who refuse to answer may not be threatened, insulted, or exposed to any unpleasant or disadvantageous treatment of any kind."
But not all enemy combatants qualify as prisoners of war, and as such are not entitled to the protection of the Geneva Convention.
 
#13
#14
ishinryu said:
Unfortunately the techniques were banned by the PM in the 70s when it came out they were used against PIRA suspects.

No further comment

Ish.
You are correct:
PM Heath, in the beginning of 1972, said that such techniques (hooding; subjection to noise; deprivation of sleep; stress positions; deprivation of food and drink) would no longer be allowed. These techniques were banned from use by the military and security forces and the ban is still in effect.
 
#15
sandmanfez said:
redgrain said:
I suppose Mr. Shiner is referring to these provisions (and others) under the Geneva Convention:

Article 3, section C
"...the following acts are and shall remain prohibited at any time and in any place whatsoever..."
"(c) Outrages upon personal dignity, in particular, humiliating and degrading treatment;"


Article 13
"Likewise, prisoners of war must at all times be protected, particularly against acts of violence or intimidation and against insults and public curiosity."

Article 17
"No physical or mental torture, nor any other form of coercion, may be inflicted on prisoners of war to secure from them information of any kind whatever. Prisoners of war who refuse to answer may not be threatened, insulted, or exposed to any unpleasant or disadvantageous treatment of any kind."
But not all enemy combatants qualify as prisoners of war, and as such are not entitled to the protection of the Geneva Convention.
You are referring to the nebulous term 'unlawful combatant'?
 
#16
"Torture techniques taught at Chicksands"

As one who survived the IT security course this comes as no real surprise.

The Horror The Horror
 
#17
So it's torture to make somebody stand for long periods and have little sleep whilst listening to loud noises. Can I pull the geneva convention on the Orderly officer on my next barrack guard?
 
#18
If hooding and plasticuffs were banned in the 70s why were we packing prisoner handling kits with them from the 80s onwards?
 
#19
woody said:
If hooding and plasticuffs were banned in the 70s why were we packing prisoner handling kits with them from the 80s onwards?
Ah, they were merely issued to safely transport prisoners ie handling prisoners. The hoods to ensure the prisoner didn't see sensitive stuff and the plasticuffs to stop him from hurting himself. Not used as a 'torture technique' your honour. As we all know, once a prisoner is brought in for questioning, he is given a comfy chair and a cup of coffee and asked if he'd like to tell us anything....your honour. All completely in line with the GC.
 
#20
you may call me ignorant for the following response but the torture "techniques" used by enemy forces are not exactly humane, so in comparison slapping someone about a bit, making them stand and not sleep is pretty tame in comparison to say using a power drill on someones genitals, or burning them with cigarettes or the many other barbaric methods of torture so in comparison theyre getting it pretty easy.

frankly your average terrorist isnt going to crack due to you asking them nicely.

but there should be some sort of line that cant be crossed but nor should tie our own hands
 
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