Tories embrace the oak in effort to modernise image.

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by Nehustan, Aug 9, 2006.

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  1. Nehustan

    Nehustan On ROPs

    [align=center][​IMG][/align]

    By Colin Brown, Deputy Political Editor
    Published: 09 August 2006

    The Conservative Party could be about to undergo a greenmakeover by replacing its torch logo with a spreading oak tree.

    The Tory leader, David Cameron, has ordered the rebranding exercise to give the party a softer image. Officials said the "mighty oak" was the frontrunner among the suggestions for a new logo to be adopted by the Tories in time for the annual Conservative Party conference in October.

    The image was shown to party workers behind closed doors yesterday but news of the rebranding exercise leaked out on a website for Conservative activists.

    One party official said the torch was being replaced because it reminded voters too much of the negative image of the Tories' past. The party leadership is clearly hoping that the spreading oak tree logo will be more "cuddly" than the torch, which was adopted in the 1970s. The torch reminded critics of a design celebrating the workers of the former Soviet Union.

    If the oak tree is adopted, the final image will not be quite as soft as the one that appeared on an activist's website. "The image on the website is very blurred, which may have been copied using a mobile phone to photograph it," said a senior Conservative official. "We are talking about using a clearer image. The oak tree image is one of a wide range of designs on which party members and workers are being consulted throughout the summer."

    There are risks about presenting the Conservatives as the party of the "tree". It may prove difficult for Mr Cameron to live up to the green image. He launched his leadership by riding a bicycle to work at the Commons. But this week he admitted he only rode to Westminster once a week. He has resorted to the chauffeur-driven limousine because he has so many papers to read.

    The oak proved popular yesterday among Tory supporters. A similar design was backed by more than half of those polled in an internet survey of activists by conservativehome.com.

    But some traditional Tory voters were outraged at the idea. "Cameron, don't do this," said one activist. "I hate the look of this tree. The torch was a great symbol and there's no need to change it."

    The Conservative Party could be about to undergo a greenmakeover by replacing its torch logo with a spreading oak tree.

    The Tory leader, David Cameron, has ordered the rebranding exercise to give the party a softer image. Officials said the "mighty oak" was the frontrunner among the suggestions for a new logo to be adopted by the Tories in time for the annual Conservative Party conference in October.

    The image was shown to party workers behind closed doors yesterday but news of the rebranding exercise leaked out on a website for Conservative activists.
     
  2. Nehustan

    Nehustan On ROPs

    JAMES CHAPMAN

    07:59am 9th August 2006

    The Conservative Party's traditional torch logo could soon be scrapped by David Cameron in favour of a green and blue oak tree, it has emerged.

    Party sources said the image, apparently designed to reinforce the Tories' new environmental credentials, had emerged as a popular choice among members and workers being consulted over a replacement for the current design.

    The design has drawn a scathing response from Tory peer Lord Tebbit, a close ally of former Prime Minister Lady Thatcher, who introduced the torch.

    He likened the oak to a 'bunch of sprouting broccoli' and said: 'Changing the logo is what companies who haven't got much else to think about tend to do. This is one of those displacement activities because they aren't thinking about policies.'

    He added: 'If you've got money to throw away, I suppose it's a wonderful thing to do. It's assumed people vote because of the logo, not because of policies.

    'I have to say I have never encountered a voter who grasped me by the lapels and said: "I would have voted Conservative, but I don't like the logo", or indeed vice versa.'

    Mr Cameron, however, is said to be determined to distance himself from Lady Thatcher by scrapping the torch logo introduced in the Iron Lady's Eighties heyday.

    Senior advisers have been drawing up plans for a new logo in line with his younger, trendier image. Mr Cameron hopes to unveil the logo at the Tory conference in October, his first as leader.

    A party source said the green and blue oak was just one of 'dozens' of designs being considered. But many party activists consulted so far have applauded the use of an oak both for its iconic national status and its connection with Mr Cameron's environmental message.

    'It's one of a number of designs being looked at and consulted on over the summer,' said the source

    'The consensus is that the torch should go.'

    A similar tree-shaped design was backed by more than half of those polled in an Internet survey of activists by the conservativehome.com website.

    The Tories' internal marketing and design team is understood to have drawn up the green and blue oak, though external firms may be asked to pitch alternatives over the coming weeks.

    A Tory spokesman said: 'Once the process is finished we will be making an announcement.'

    The so-called 'freedom torch' was first introduced by Lady Thatcher in 1987 and revamped by Michael Howard for the 2004 annual conference.

    He had the torch altered so that it was held aloft by a disembodied arm. It was meant to represent a rolled-up sleeve in line with Mr Howard's pledge to 'get the job done'.

    The colour of the torch was also changed to red, white and blue to head off the threat from the anti-European UKIP Party. But critics said the logo looked like something from the Thirties.

    Mr Cameron is said to regard it is 'old-fashioned and too strident' for the modern Tory Party.

    Labour replaced its red flag with a red rose in 1987.
     
  3. Nehustan

    Nehustan On ROPs

    It's not bad enough that people often call me 'Jamie and the Magic Torch' until yesterday my signature was 'Acorns Grow into Great Oaks'. Let's not get started on my current signature :twisted:
     
  4. As I am sure Maggie would say

    Wet Wet Wet
     
  5. The saying "You can only polish a turd so much..."
     
  6. Why choose an old oak tree when you wish to portray your party as new and forward looking?

    Odd choice for an odd bloke I suppose
     
  7. Nehustan

    Nehustan On ROPs


    Ahhh, Wets and Wigs, the way forward IMO :twisted:
     
  8. Nehustan

    Nehustan On ROPs

    I suppose it is the Green aspect, the continuity of oak, etc. I know I mentioned my signature, but in light of your comment maybe they should have cleverly drawn in an acorn to the design to signify renewal?

    [align=center]"Hello 0 this is acorn message over."[/align]
    [align=center] ;)[/align]
     
  9. The oke simbolises longevatie and traditon (since it is a tree that gets very old) which are traditonal conservative values. The new image that the Torys are trying to make for them selfs is not that far fetched if you look at the idiology be hind Conservatisam.
     
  10. Nehustan

    Nehustan On ROPs

    I suppose the linguistic root of Conservative and Conservation (which certainly has an ecological connotation) are the same.
     
  11. I can see why changing the logo would help.

    "Hmm who did old man pillager tell me to vote for?"
    said apolitical pillager when he last voted
    "oh the tory party, Ill vote for them"
    My pen waivering above the box.
    "nooooooooo I cant vote for them, that torch logo looks really gay"

    this time of course it will be different.

    "Hmmmm which is the party with the funky logo?"
    "Ill vote for these guys, they look like a bundle of laughs"

    I dont think anyone that was planning on voting for the conservatives is likely to be put off by the logo nor vice versa.

    They could try forming some policies that appealed to voters nad losing the sleazy salesman of a poarty leader!
     
  12. The party branches will hopefully soon twig that they should all leave things as they were.
     
  13. Nehustan

    Nehustan On ROPs

    We're discussing Oak trees not corn ;) But seriously I was speaking with a left wing friend the other day who described conservative policy as 'laissez faire'. In an ever changing geo-political landscape leaving things as they were will not suffice. 60 odd years ago there was the 'Battle of Britain', today anyone with the ability to percieve say 20/20 hindsight in say 2020 will know that today geo-politically we are in 'The Battle For Britain'. I think in reply to the comment of 'laissez faire' I might put 'Que tombe?'