Top lad you. Cheers.

Indeed, as a Captain I had a Very Senior Officer on a course who was a right PITA. He ran off to the CO (who the VSO outranked by several stages) when I said No to him. I was told by the 2IC who was in the next office that part of the conversation went:
VSO: I blame Captain Devex’s attitude on his obvious lack of education.
CO: Really? He went to a Public School, has a degree, a Masters and better language qualifications than you. I on the other hand left my comprehensive at 16 with no O Levels. However, I am the CO of this unit and I both back and agree with Devex’s decision and if you don’t like it you can talk to the Brigadier...Sir

I heard nothing more from the VSO who continued to be a monumental pen1s
William Shakespeare: "Behold, on yon fielde the stickietogetherness of those fellows whom mine archers, varlets and scoundrels calleth the chunkies, truly a band of brothers..."

Ed " Leave that bit out Will, it's bollocks".

WS : " Fairy snuff bruv".
 
Bessbrook, late 70s, there’s a one pip Rodney (the type who wants to know where the “departure lounge” is) in the AAC line hut complaining that his Gazelle is late. The cab arrives and Rodney stamps across the dispersal ready to vent his spleen.. in the pilots seat, with a big grin on his face is the Regimental colonel, keeping his hours up.
The last time i saw him was when I was on scheme playing umpires, he clambered over the tailgate of the Bedford at late o’ clock, flopped in an armchair (yes, very non tac) and demanded a beer...
Top lad.
I did a 3(ish) year tour in NI and our CO would cover about three duties a month, as you say to keep his hours up but mainly to get a feel for how the “users” were treating the lads and running the tasking. It could be a double edged weapon though.

We had a young Navy exchange pilot come through on a four-monther from BAOR and one day he had a routine task to insert a patrol in S Armagh. The next day the CO took over and went off to bring the patrol in. Half way back to BBK he gets a tap on the shoulder and is passed a scrap of paper on which is written “can we fly upside down again please”
 

BopBopBop

War Hero
Det Insp Jack Regan Walt!

Have you had your dinner?
Leave it out guv'nr stop giving me the verbals.

I was armed surveillance team.

But the two on my right were shouting "Put your trousers on, your nicked" before getting a "W" from the Beak to spin the drum.
 
Not many Uncle. That lads got a slimey on the Bill, I knew him when he was in Clapham when he was on the River Ouze. He's alright, he ain't tooled up enough, he doesn't need any Gorilla but he's usually got some Charlie up his skid marks and you don't need a daffodil.
 

NI-EX-MEDIC

War Hero
Top stuff. Now we have imaginary armed troops swarming the streets of Kew on the word of three cars full of imaginary coppers chasing one carload of swarthy desperadoes sent on a wild goose chase by Captain Gripping-Hands up there.

When do the black helos arrive? I mean never arrive. They weren't there. You saw nothing.

Geez, even Barbara Cartland never came up with such shite romancing.
Hi you bitter little man, when did I ever mention troops! I am quite sure I said three car loads of police but maybe you have early stages of dementia and your mind is playing tricks with you. Reach out to me and I can point to where you can get help.
Regards
Enoch
 
I did a 3(ish) year tour in NI and our CO would cover about three duties a month, as you say to keep his hours up but mainly to get a feel for how the “users” were treating the lads and running the tasking. It could be a double edged weapon though.

We had a young Navy exchange pilot come through on a four-monther from BAOR and one day he had a routine task to insert a patrol in S Armagh. The next day the CO took over and went off to bring the patrol in. Half way back to BBK he gets a tap on the shoulder and is passed a scrap of paper on which is written “can we fly upside down again please”
The navy were always better for a ‘fun run’. I do remember once having a fun cabby in a Wessex over the plane, sat in the seat opposite the door, when we all felt a little bit of a bang. Looking out of the door I remember seeing the wheel turning with a tuft of grass stuck to it...
 
Hi you bitter little man, when did I ever mention troops! I am quite sure I said three car loads of police but maybe you have early stages of dementia and your mind is playing tricks with you. Reach out to me and I can point to where you can get help.
Regards
Enoch
If it's any consolation, I can well imagine you acting out all your conversations with little Lego men before posting.
 

bedended

War Hero
The navy were always better for a ‘fun run’. I do remember once having a fun cabby in a Wessex over the plane, sat in the seat opposite the door, when we all felt a little bit of a bang. Looking out of the door I remember seeing the wheel turning with a tuft of grass stuck to it...
Morning @bob_the_bomb,
S.Armagh 4 day border op late 70s. Stuck in a bush, pissing down, freezing, soaked and blowing a hoolie(that tour seemed to consist of these essential ingredients).
Called for pre-arrangled helo-extraction only to be told none available. ie. Weather too bad, wait for daylight and better weather:mad:. Suddenly a voice comes on the net saying. "If you can be ready in 30 min's, send grid ref'., and pick up available".
Cue fastest packing, collapsing of hide and on way to pup ever.
RN chopper turns up. We dived in and with a friendly, nonchalant "We were passing" from loadie, were whisked back to XMG. We were subsequently told that 'they' handn't finished writing the rule book for RN chopper pilots, therefore the pilots were a bit more 'relaxed' where rules are concerned. I think they were just more used to flying in shitty weather.
Top lads RN :salut::salut:
 
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Morning @bob_the_bomb,
S.Armagh 4 day border op late 70s. Stuck in a bush, pissing down, freezing, soaked and blowing a hoolie(that tour seemed to consist of these essential ingredients).
Called for pre-arrangled helo-extraction only to be told none available. ie. Weather too bad, wait for daylight and better weather:mad:. Suddenly a voice comes on the net saying. "If we can be ready in 30 min's, send grid ref'., and pick up available".
Cue fastest packing, collapsing of hide and on way to pup ever.
RN chopper turns up. We dived in and with a friendly, nonchalant "We were passing" from loadie, were whisked back to XMG. We were subsequently told that 'they' handn't finished writing the rule book for RN chopper pilots, therefore the pilots were a bit more 'relaxed' where rules are concerned. I think they were just more used to flying in shitty weather.
Top lads RN :salut::salut:
Similar dit.

In 94 I was moving to Tuzla in NE Bosnia, and waiting for a helicopter flight from Visoko. It started to snow and I started to pick up my bergan and move back to the accommodation.

The Danish movers told me to stand by, the Norwegian helicopter was inbound.

They made the whole flight through the blizzard on NVG.

After we landed I told the driver I was surprised they flew.

He told me:

“I’ve just come from Spitsbergen; if we didn’t fly in snow we’d never fly at all”

I guess the RN lads have to take the same attitude to weather :)
 

NI-EX-MEDIC

War Hero
Morning @bob_the_bomb,
S.Armagh 4 day border op late 70s. Stuck in a bush, pissing down, freezing, soaked and blowing a hoolie(that tour seemed to consist of these essential ingredients).
Called for pre-arrangled helo-extraction only to be told none available. ie. Weather too bad, wait for daylight and better weather:mad:. Suddenly a voice comes on the net saying. "If we can be ready in 30 min's, send grid ref'., and pick up available".
Cue fastest packing, collapsing of hide and on way to pup ever.
RN chopper turns up. We dived in and with a friendly, nonchalant "We were passing" from loadie, were whisked back to XMG. We were subsequently told that 'they' handn't finished writing the rule book for RN chopper pilots, therefore the pilots were a bit more 'relaxed' where rules are concerned. I think they were just more used to flying in shitty weather.
Top lads RN :salut::salut:
Circa 1992 my mate was in a Chinook flight from Dungannon to Cappagh with a pilot he had spent all afernoon in the pub with, he said the flying fine but the speech very slurred.
 

Sammer

War Hero
Circa 1992 my mate was in a Chinook flight from Dungannon to Cappagh with a pilot he had spent all afernoon in the pub with, he said the flying fine but the speech very slurred.
What are you implying? If you are implying that the pilot was drunk, I’d call your ‘mate’ a lying cunt.
 
Circa 1992 my mate was in a Chinook flight from Dungannon to Cappagh with a pilot he had spent all afernoon in the pub with, he said the flying fine but the speech very slurred.
The thing is, there’s more than one crew to a Chinook. Given the natural tendency of helicopters to fall out of the sky, I very much doubt that, should the driver tie one on, the rest of the crew would let him fly.
 

NI-EX-MEDIC

War Hero
The thing is, there’s more than one crew to a Chinook. Given the natural tendency of helicopters to fall out of the sky, I very much doubt that, should the driver tie one on, the rest of the crew would let him fly.
Have you ever been in a Chinnook in an operational capacity, the rules I am afraid tend to get blurred. I will also say that travelling in the seat between the two guys at the sharp end wearing NVG's and at 60 to 80 metres off the ground most of the way is one of my most enjoyable experiaces in the army.
 
Have you ever been in a Chinnook in an operational capacity, the rules I am afraid tend to get blurred. I will also say that travelling in the seat between the two guys at the sharp end wearing NVG's and at 60 to 80 metres off the ground most of the way is one of my most enjoyable experiaces in the army.
Liar.
 
Have you ever been in a Chinnook in an operational capacity, the rules I am afraid tend to get blurred. I will also say that travelling in the seat between the two guys at the sharp end wearing NVG's and at 60 to 80 metres off the ground most of the way is one of my most enjoyable experiaces in the army.
Oooh! Listen to him!

Without getting into a dick-measuring competition about ‘operational’ helicopter flights I’d simply point out to you that, if you want to keep something in the sky that has the fundamental aerodynamic qualities of a brick then you need all of your wits about you. Regardless of how ‘operational’ the environment is. I very very much doubt the rest of the crew would let their driver get drunk. Perhaps even more so in an operational environment.

But let’s ask people who know more about this stuff.

@beefer for example.
 

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