Top Iraqi Al-Qaida Lt captured in Iraq

Mr Happy

LE
Moderator
#1
Getting closer to Zarqawi all the time... Aparently this news has been embargoed for nine days whilst they used the thumb tacks...

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&e=3&u=/ap/20050124/ap_on_re_mi_ea/iraq_militant_arrest

BAGHDAD, Iraq - Iraqi security forces have arrested the "most lethal" top lieutenant of al-Qaida's leader in Iraq (news - web sites) — a man allegedly behind 75 percent of the car bombings in Baghdad since the U.S.-led invasion, the prime minister's office said Monday.

Sami Mohammed Ali Said al-Jaaf, also known as Abu Omar al-Kurdi, was arrested during a Jan. 15 raid in Baghdad, a government statement said Monday. Two other militants linked to Jordanian-born Abu Musab al-Zarqawi's terror group also have been arrested, authorities announced Monday.

Al-Jaaf was "the most lethal of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi's lieutenants," the statement said.

Jordanian-born al-Zarqawi heads al-Qaida in Iraq, the terror network's local affiliate. The group is behind many of the car bombings, beheadings, assassinations and other attacks driving the insurgency in Iraq.

Al-Jaaf was responsible for 32 car bombing attacks that killed hundreds of Iraqis, the statement said.

"Abu Omar al-Kurdi claims responsibility for some of the most ruthless attacks on Iraqi police forces and police stations," said Thaer al-Naqib, spokesman for interim Prime Minister Ayad Allawi.

The statement said al-Jaaf "confessed to building approximately 75 percent of the car bombs used in attacks in Baghdad since March 2003," al-Naqib said.

Authorities also announced Monday that Iraqi security forces had arrested a man described as the chief of al-Zarqawi's propaganda operations.

And in the northern city of Mosul, Iraqi forces seized one of al-Zarqawi's weapons suppliers.
 
#4
Mr Happy said:
MSR, you are a ray of sunshine in my day.... give it time.
I've lost count of the number of "most lethal" scrotes that have been picked up to the sound of excited cries of "we've got them on the run" and "we've broken that back of the insurgency" ringing in our ears. And none of them have mattered. Remember when picking up Saddam was going to usher in a bright new dawn ?

The insurgency we face is not a single organisation. It has many aims, many heads and is organised as a loose and fluid network. Any one individual can be lost without much effect on the organisation. To think otherwise is to delude ourselves as to the nature of the enemy we face.
 
#5
The biggest mistake "we" (as in the West) make is assuming the insurgency is structured like our armed forces, in reality it's much more flexible, but disorganised

Taking out one man doesn't make a jot of difference, particularly in light of a senior member of the interim Iraqi government admitting there are probably more members of the insurgency than there are Coalition troops
 

Mr Happy

LE
Moderator
#6
One_of_the_strange said:
I've lost count of the number of "most lethal" scrotes that have been picked up to the sound of excited cries of "we've got them on the run"
As it happens I can't remember any other time except the Saddam and his sons but if there were then that's fine. I hope that this is a considerable step in the right direction.

The biggest mistake "we" (as in the West) make is assuming the insurgency is structured like our armed forces, in reality it's much more flexible, but disorganised

Taking out one man doesn't make a jot of difference,
As for thinking that this terrorist organisation is a multi headed coiled snake please take a deap breath and have a word with yourself. Arab terrorists are like children in a playground, they need a leader of the pack, taking one out will allow another will come to the fore - he'll be inexperienced and unable to control effectively immediately but he will learn. The trick is to take out the leader and break up the pack at the same time so there is nothing for the next leader to control. I call this the 500lb method. :lol:
 

OldSnowy

LE
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#7
As mentioned before, this is not a 'traditional' terrorist group here - what it is, is a revolt by the 'once-hads' against losing power. The Sunnis had it all, they lost it, and they aren't happy. As they make up nearly 20% of the population, that's a lot of potential baddies.

Until some way is found of either 'including' the Sunnis into the Government, or otherwise neutralising their threat (God knows how) then the attacks will continue. It is certainly being aided and abetted by others (Syria and Iran) with a track record of support to Terrs, who obviously want to keep the Yanks bogged down there, rather than threatening them. Al Quai'da - or whoever - who wants to attack the West will find plenty of targets in Iraq, and frankly I'd rather they were there than over here.

I for one am looking forward to seeing an Arab country that has a democratically- elected Governement; it'll be a first, and will scare the sh1t out of their neighbours :twisted:

Iraqis are generally great people - I made some great friends out there - and they deserve a chance.
 
#9
The real fun starts when the 60% odd Shia majority decide to kick off if it appears as if they're not going to get what they want. Trouble is, it's looking like what they want is not what the US thinks they should want. Left to their own devices I think we'd see a system not unlike that in Iran where religion plays a far larger part than it does in western democracies. (Of course if it was fundamental christianity then GWB wouldn't be too bothered, but it's not.)

So the US has to choose between being asked to leave and having a muslim state in charge of the oil, or risking a catastrophic increase in insurgency. And no one individual will be in charge.
 
#10
Gents please put me right if I have it wong, but this election is for 'MPs' the President stays as Allawi ? cum who may and he's king George's boy.
The Kurds eem to have their own "Iraq' the Shias will soon have there's so standard Brit divide and 'rule', or the Yank version.
john
 

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