Top Civil Servants Pay

#1
Now released

http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/

MoD breakdown here
http://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/2010/06/value-for-money/



Sir Jock Stirrup Chief of the Defence Staff Air Chief Marshal £240,000 - £244,999

Sir Mark Stanhope First Sea Lord and Chief of the Naval staff Admiral £175,000 - £179,999

Sir Kevin O'Donoghue Chief of Defence Materiel General £175,000 - £179,999

Peter Ruddock Saudi Arabia Project Team Air Marshal £175,000 - £179,999

Sir David Richards Chief of the General Staff General £165,000 - £169,999

Sir Stephen Dalton Chief of the Air Staff Air Chief Marshal £165,000 - £169,999

Sir Nicholas Houghton Vice Chief of the Defence Staff General £165,000 - £169,999

Sir John McColl Deputy Supreme Allied Commander Europe General £165,000 - £169,999

Sir Trevor Soar Commander-In-Chief Fleet Admiral £160,000 - £164,999

Sir Peter Wall Commander-in-Chief Land Forces General £160,000 - £164,999

Andrew Tyler Chief Operating Officer Defence Equipment and Support Director General £200,000 - £204,999

Andrew Manley DG Defence Commercial Director General £195,000 - £199,999

Sir Bill Jeffrey Permanent Under Secretary Permanent Secretary £175,000 - £179,999

Jon Thompson DG Finance Director General £175,000 - £179,999

John Hirst Chief Executive Met Office Director £170,000 - £174,999

Mike Robinson Chief Executive UK Hydrographic Office Director £170,000 - £174,999

Les Mosco Director Commercial Defence Equipment and Support Director £165,000 - £169,999

Susanna Mason Director Industrial Relationships Director £160,000 - £164,999

Ursula Brennan 2nd Permanent Under Secretary Permanent Secretary £155,000 - £159,999

Archie Hughes Chief Executive Defence Support Group Director £155,000 - £159,999

Stephen Love Chief Executive/Chief Constable MoD Police and Guarding Agency Director £155,000 - £159,999

Bruce Houlder QC Director Service Prosecutions Director £150,000 - £154,999

Ian Rushby Non-Executive Director Defence Board and Chair Audit Committee Non-Executive £40k

David Allen Non-Executive Director Defence Board and Chair Audit Committee Non-Executive £30k

Sir Richard Mottram Non-Executive Chair DSTL Non-Executive £40k

Sandra Rogers Non-Executive Chair UKHO Non-Executive £40k

Jamie Pike Non-Executive Chair DSG Non-Executive £40k

Robert Napier Non-Executive Chair Met Office Non-Executive £40k
 
#3
A comparison with the u.s. dept of defence would be interesting, also Tesco's , start googling , free mars bar to the first with all the gen. :eek:
 

chimera

LE
Moderator
#5
What's the big deal with senior officers salaries being published? The Senior Salaries Review Body pay scales are not secret, they are made public every year:

http://www.ome.uk.com/SSRB_Reports.aspx
 
#6
revmodes said:
A comparison with the u.s. dept of defence would be interesting, also Tesco's , start googling , free mars bar to the first with all the gen. :eek:
US DoD pay rates for serving officers (and civil servants) are limited by their "no more than the elected officials" rules - they will be on a max of about $180k basic pay, about £124k (so just under point 1 on our 3-star scale). Err - oops - if they are in certain jobs, they get on to Schedule 1, which is a max of $240k, so £166k - tier point 1 of our 4-star scale ...

Terry Leahy makes over £5m per year ...

Edited to add - if they are serious about getting down to £58k - that's not much more than the basic pay for a super-annuated Major ...
 
#7
#8
Compare the figures for these two public organisations.

Number of employees 2009

MOD: 281,000 (link).
BBC: 20,000+ (link)

Budget 2008/9

MOD: £33.6 bn (link)
BBC: £4.5bn (link)

Now compare the salaries of the MoD's few top executives, literally responsible for making life and death decisions, with their counterparts in the BBC, mostly responsible for entertainment. Notwithstanding the unpublished millions per year earned by other BBC employees such as Jonathan Ross, etc (link), bear in mind that CDS is the only person in the MOD who earns over £200k:

The BBC executive salary bill
The Times 25 June 2009 said:
The salaries of BBC executives and their expenses claims have been revealed in full:

Executive salaries

£647,000 Mark Thompson, Director General

£459,000 Mark Byford, Deputy Director General

£406,000 Jana Bennett, Director BBC Vision

£380,000 Jon Smith, Chief Executive BBC Worldwide

£370,000-£400,000 Peter Salamon, Director BBC North

£329,000 Zarin Patel, Chief Financial Officer

£328,000 Caroline Thompson, Chief Operating Officer

£314,000 Timothy Davie, Director Audio & Music

£310,000-£340,000 Alex Yentob, Creative Director BBC Finance; Erik Hughes, Director Future Media and Technology; Helen Boaden, Director BBC News; Sharon Baylay, Director Marketing, Communications and Audiences

£280,000-£310,000 Balraj Samara, Director Vision Operations; Pat Longhrey, Director Nation and Regions; Richard Sambrook, Director Global News

£250,000-£280,000 Dominic Coles, Chief Operating Officer Journalism; Jay Hunt, Controller BBC One; Roland Keating, Director of Archive Content (TV)

£220,000-£250,000 Daniel Cohen, Controller, BBC Three; Ed Williams, Director of Communications, Marketing; Janice Hadlow, Controller BBC Two; John Linwood, Chief Technology Officer, Future Media & Technology; John Yorke, Controller television drama production; Julie Gardner; Head of Independent Drama Commissioning; Nicholas Kroll, Director BBC Trust; Richard Deverell, Controller children’s television; Roger Mosey, Director sport

£190,000-£220,000 Andrew Parfitt, Controller RI/IXtra/Asian Network, Audio & Music; Andy Griffee, Editorial Director Project 1, Operations; Anne Morrison, Controller Network Production; Chris Day, Group Financial Controller; Chris Kane, Head of Corporate Real Estate; Dorothy Prior, Controller Production Resource; Emma Swan, Head of In-House Commissioning, BBC Vision; Graham Ellis, Controller Production, Audio and Music; John Vickerman, HR Shared Services Director; Liam Keelan, Controller daytime television; Marka Damazer, Controller Radio 4 and Radio 7; Mike Goodie, Director Employee Relations; Nicholas Eldred, Group General Counsel and Secretary; Peter Horrocks, Director World Service; Peter White, Chief Executive, BBC Digital UK; Richard Klein, Controller BBC Four; Robert Shennan, Controller Radio 2 and 6 Music; Roger Wright; Controller R3; Stephen Mitchell, Head of multimedia news programmes; Tom Archer, Controller factual production, BBC Vision
Does anyone else think we've got the balance wrong?
 
#11
Looking at these, and working in the civil service with a healthy disrespect for my "leader", I can easily see where the government can save some money...
 
#12
WOW Cat believe how little the top brass get compared with an average NHS trust or PCT (and there are shed loads of them) Ch Exec 200k+
Director 150k+, Deputy Director 100k
I think CDS and the heads of Services carry a lot more on their shoulders
 
#14
ashie said:
msr said:
I think we should compare it with the average UK salary of £20k-£25k (give or take)

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/8151355.stm

msr
No, they should be compared with those at the top of their profession in private industry.

Is the government making those figures available?
No, the same criteria does not apply. Private industry failures are dismissed, public sector failures are at best promoted, sidelined or hidden. Reduce public sector salaries by 50%, you will still get good applicants, I would even argue that the public sector pension should remain in place in this case.
 
#16
Turk said:
some big earners there. Bit of a pay jump going from CGS to CDS though, could buy a jolly nice car for that...
Another wage envy thread. A range of £30k to £245K is hardly 'big earners' - especially when some of those have had very long careers on much less.
Shockingly, senior Officers are on more money than those below them. If they weren't, why would they bother getting promoted?
If you want them to have a pay cut then everyone below them would also need a pay cut to ensure incremental salary increases.
 
#17
Ashie

Still peddling the same socialist apologist crap, you know full well that public sector salaries under the last administration were bloated beyond belief on the fallacy that it was required to attract talent.

While the truth is that on the whole idle time serving public sector worthies voted themselves fat salaries. Granted the rises did get worse a couple of years ago when they sensed that the gravy train was heading for the buffers.

Can’t wait for the public sector cuts to bite and bite deep into the non jobs and the socialist elite.
 
#18
Yeo_Man said:
Ashie

Still peddling the same socialist apologist crap, you know full well that public sector salaries under the last administration were bloated beyond belief on the fallacy that it was required to attract talent.

While the truth is that on the whole idle time serving public sector worthies voted themselves fat salaries. Granted the rises did get worse a couple of years ago when they sensed that the gravy train was heading for the buffers.

Can’t wait for the public sector cuts to bite and bite deep into the non jobs and the socialist elite.
I see your clichethon is still working, then. Are you Littlecock in disguise? And I wonder how much he earns.
 
#19
Ashie

No just very hard working tax payer who is looking forward to seeing the public sector and all who hide in it, take some pain.

The waste, arrogance and self deceit of the last administration has been staggering on a scale that would embarrass Nero.

Comparing the vast majority of senior public sector managers with the private sector is an absolute joke that has gone on for far too long, cull them.

YM
 
#20
Yeo_Man said:
Ashie

No just very hard working tax payer who is looking forward to seeing the public sector and all who hide in it, take some pain.

The waste, arrogance and self deceit of the last administration has been staggering on a scale that would embarrass Nero.

Comparing the vast majority of senior public sector managers with the private sector is an absolute joke that has gone on for far too long, cull them.

YM
Wow. The clichethon is hidden behind the hateathon. Hate away if it makes you feel better, but I'm sure normal decent working people don't feel the way you do. Public sector workers are themselves, taxpayers, of course. And most, if not all, of the ones I know are hard working too.
 

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