Paint & Tools Tools, Paints etc thread

#41
wanted to show these images earlier...
reamer, get it from the Airbrush centre Lancing, great for blowing through the nozzle tip

the straw with tip attached, hold onto it or it will shoot off into the darkest reaches of the shed

nylon (various sizes,) brushes for the front end.

view inside the bowl, light at the end of the tunnel.

always leave mine to dry before finishing re assembly, here in an old takeaway tray.
 
#42
wanted to show these images earlier...
reamer, get it from the Airbrush centre Lancing, great for blowing through the nozzle tip

the straw with tip attached, hold onto it or it will shoot off into the darkest reaches of the shed

nylon (various sizes,) brushes for the front end.

view inside the bowl, light at the end of the tunnel.

always leave mine to dry before finishing re assembly, here in an old takeaway tray.
Guardroom 21.00, show clean needle :)
 
#43
Well that was an enjoyable afternoon.

1550908732198.png


As @SPROCKET321 said these models make an excellent learning tool. Although you could have done it without one it did make the build a lot easier.

As to the tool it worked well and once you get used to it you find that you do not need to unscrew the clamp a lot, about half a turn to slide the item in and out. You can on small parts just use your fingers to hold it closed without tightening the clamp. The two plastic tools worked well especially for small bends. For larger bends, once you have started the bend you can use the long side of the plastic tool to complete it and get a good 90 degrees.

Planning your bend is key and selecting the right part to bend against. Multiple folds can be difficult as the first or last fold may be hindered by other folds and selecting the place to bend against so that a fold does not come up against the clamp.

Was it worth £20? That would depend on how much bending you are going to do but I feel I have not wasted my money.
 

smeg-head

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#44
wanted to show these images earlier...
reamer, get it from the Airbrush centre Lancing, great for blowing through the nozzle tip
He-he reamer! He-he
 

Sadurian

LE
Book Reviewer
#45
Anyone umming & ahhing about whether to buy a pin vice go for it .
The pin vice is also a better option when drilling through plastic. Using a mini-drill it is easy to melt the plastic, making a mess of the area being drilled and also fusing the drill bit in situ.

I use the pin vice when I'm drilling with very small bits - the control is essential when you are using something the diameter of 1mm. My collection of broken fine diameter bits is evidence.
 

Sadurian

LE
Book Reviewer
#46
wanted to show these images earlier...
reamer, get it from the Airbrush centre Lancing, great for blowing through the nozzle tip

the straw with tip attached, hold onto it or it will shoot off into the darkest reaches of the shed

nylon (various sizes,) brushes for the front end.

view inside the bowl, light at the end of the tunnel.

always leave mine to dry before finishing re assembly, here in an old takeaway tray.
I bought a set of airbrush cleaning brushes on eBay a few months ago. Nice and cheap and shipped from Ireland so I wouldn't need to wait weeks for shipping.

Ireland via Qingdao as it turned out. The brushes are decent enough, but I was heartily annoyed at being deceived as to the point of origin.
 
#47
Quick question. Those of you that use airbrushes to do your painting, I assume you have some kind of spray booth set up? Did anyone have problems with not being near a window etc for extraction?
I use a portable spray booth, and it works quite well. It's not near a window, and not too bad for extraction, but I've not done any major surfaces yet. I wrap the folding shields in a single layer of newspaper, and just a touch of masking tape to hold it on.

My next problem is getting a new filter for the booth, the exiting one is getting a bit clogged...
 
#48
The pin vice is also a better option when drilling through plastic. Using a mini-drill it is easy to melt the plastic, making a mess of the area being drilled and also fusing the drill bit in situ.

I use the pin vice when I'm drilling with very small bits - the control is essential when you are using something the diameter of 1mm. My collection of broken fine diameter bits is evidence.
That's bloody huge for a drill bit :)
 

Sadurian

LE
Book Reviewer
#49
That's bloody huge for a drill bit :)
I use everything from bits intended for 'proper' power tools down to 0.3mm. It depends on the purpose of the drilling as I might be dismantling an old Corgi die-cast for refurbishment one day and inserting fine wire as a bowstring on a 28mm figure the next. My most common use is drilling out to drill-and-pin limbs or hands, and I use wire and brass rod of approximately 1mm for that . I use slightly larger for replacing 28mm spears and smaller for (for example) 20mm German rigid vehicle aerials.

Horses for courses.
 

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