'Too posh to wash', think tank says family of hospital patients should nurse them.

#1
#2
My wife has done this as a matter of course for me for over 20 years.
Its fairly standard practise overseas.

One of the things that boils my piss us watching a half dozen mongs visiting one of their assorted clan in hospital and bellowing at a nurse run off her feet that 'someone should get my cuz some water!', 'someone should brush my aunts hair' etc.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#3
I thought this was only SOPs in places like Calcutta ..
 
#4
One of the things that boils my piss us watching a half dozen mongs visiting one of their assorted clan in hospital and bellowing at a nurse run off her feet that 'someone should get my cuz some water!', 'someone should brush my aunts hair' etc.
Seen it, and have done it... as in actually got the water or similar (not the bellowing), and I once was allowed to hang around after visiting hours because an old boy was dying (actually in the ward with family around) and my Granddad was doddering about (he was losing his mind) distressed and generally getting in the way.

True dit, in hospital he refered to some of the nurses as 'natives' and that they were treating him very well and also gave a blow by blow account of sh1t being sprayed every where from some sort of invention in his head which merged the toilets with a high pressure pneumatic system. Less amusing was watching him follow the hand rails looking for the valuve to turn the air on for the miners.

That said, I don't agree with premise that we should be under some sort of obligation to hang around incase they need taking to the toilet.

If neccesary we should explore the axeing of managerial roles, and opening of spots for 'Nurse Auxileries' non medical caring staff who could handle the humdrum and cleaning.
 
#7
Seen it, and have done it... as in actually got the water or similar (not the bellowing), and I once was allowed to hang around after visiting hours because an old boy was dying (actually in the ward with family around) and my Granddad was doddering about (he was losing his mind) distressed and generally getting in the way.

True dit, in hospital he refered to some of the nurses as 'natives' and that they were treating him very well and also gave a blow by blow account of sh1t being sprayed every where from some sort of invention in his head which merged the toilets with a high pressure pneumatic system. Less amusing was watching him follow the hand rails looking for the valuve to turn the air on for the miners.

That said, I don't agree with premise that we should be under some sort of obligation to hang around incase they need taking to the toilet.

If neccesary we should explore the axeing of managerial roles, and opening of spots for 'Nurse Auxileries' non medical caring staff who could handle the humdrum and cleaning.
I agree with your sentiment, but jeez, do you own a dictionary?


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#8
I've visited friends and relatives in hospital and helped them while I'm there, however are they seriously expecting that I take time off work three times a day to feed a relative on a ward? what will those with no local relatives do? What about those with no known relatives at all?

what we need is some kind of specialist in caring for the sick and injured. They could work on wards on our behalf and be properly trained for the job. Maybe we could pay for them out of our taxes. Is that too crazy an idea to work?

I'm sure we could get some foreigners in to do it on the cheap.
 
#9
I've visited friends and relatives in hospital and helped them while I'm there, however are they seriously expecting that I take time off work three times a day to feed a relative on a ward? what will those with no local relatives do? What about those with no known relatives at all?

what we need is some kind of specialist in caring for the sick and injured. They could work on wards on our behalf and be properly trained for the job. Maybe we could pay for them out of our taxes. Is that too crazy an idea to work?

I'm sure we could get some foreigners in to do it on the cheap.
W could call the nurses! It all went south with the introduction of nursing degrees: wipe his arse. I have a degree, dontcha know!


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N

NurseyMai

Guest
#10
Agreed - this is ridiculous as it not only puts pressure on the family but it reduces valuable nurse - patient contact time to check things the family might not notice, such as pressure sores. I can understand the need to save money but not when it's in any way to the detriment of patient care.
 
#13
So what are the staff doing? When I worked in hospitals this was part of the job and time to get to know the patient (no not in the "Biblical" sense) and check for pressure sores ect. As a student nurse I was told off for not washing a patient as he had not slept well and was asleep when I went to wash him, patient said thanks.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
#14
another reason why it was a mistake to strip the wards of students and take nursing to degree level alienating the bread and butter students the nhs needed and thrived on.

students and sens used to look after the patients needs while the srns looked after the patients care.

not everyone can afford nor is suited to a degree course and the end result think they are care managers not care workers
 

OldSnowy

LE
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#15
W could call the nurses! It all went south with the introduction of nursing degrees: wipe his arse. I have a degree, dontcha know!


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Completely correct. My wife, after many years of Nursing, gave up a few years ago as she got fed up with the new Graduate Nurses. They are, for the most part, not only too busy (see below) but too posh to wash and clean up shit. That's not what they went to Uni for.

As they are so expensive, they are increasingly supplemented with cheap and ill-trained Auxiliaries - so fewer Nurses, and those always seem busy keeping paperwork up-to-date.

The bottom line is a combination of expensive Nurses, and simply too many people in the UK. Oh, and indeed, from experience, I know that if you want a vulnerable patient looked after, it is always best to do it yourself. This is aproblem, as most infectins in hospitals are brought in by visitors - so lots more of them won't help on that front.
 
#16
The probem is people are much more crocked up and or obese as well so it takes two to wash a person medication takes two and takes a lot of time add obs and writing up notes your rapidly running out of people and time.

Some nursing tasks do take degree level training nurses are now doing stuff that was done by doctors but you now have hca's doing nursing tasks that are not fully trained.
basic nursing needs lots of people and a good leader without enough bodies things go to ratshit regardless how good the staff are.
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
#17
What we need is some kind of specialist in caring for the sick and injured. They could work on wards on our behalf and be properly trained for the job. Maybe we could pay for them out of our taxes. Is that too crazy an idea to work?
We used to have such and they were wonderful people. They were called nurses!
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#18
W could call the nurses! It all went south with the introduction of nursing degrees: wipe his arse. I have a degree, dontcha know!


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Nursing used to be more task orientated, students spent lots of time on wards. Now nursing is very much evidence and research based so wards are devoid of this free labour.
Students were included in the numbers of staff, there were lots of students on wards. When I started my training we did a few weeks in school them off to an acute psychiatric ward, two weeks more in school then off to medical, then surgical, followed by A&E, then district nursing. Then we had leave, two weeks in school then back on wards.
 

mercurydancer

LE
Book Reviewer
#19
I've heard that alot, but how true is it?
Its not true at all. I have never yet heard a nurse refuse to clean a soiled patient. I hear on a daily basis that nurses have conflicting priorities which means that basic care is often de-prioritised. This does not mean that the nurse does not care, but if a patient with a sepsis needs intravenous antibiotics, glucose, oxygen and IV Isoplex NOW means that priority is set. A patient who has soiled themselves comes lower on the priority. I do not know of a ward manager on any of the wards I deal with, has anything other than the highest standards for cleanliness for their patients.

Family being requested to attend to their family in some cases makes a lot of sense. Patients with acute delerium (usually post-operative) are confused, but its quite unlike Alzheimer's disease, in that the agitation and fear can be much more. A comforting face can be far better than staff. I have seen, on many occasions, where a confused patient has been given food by staff and has chucked the plate against windows/doors/staff/into the corridor, when a family member has been able to settle the patient down and get them to eat.

Some cultures find that providing simple cares for the relative is necessary. Its impressive and humbling to see a Sikh family care for a relative. So we as nurses, ask if the relatives want to provide care. Its not an obligation, its an enquiry if they would wish to provide care.

I can speak with pride about the wards I work with, they rate of pressure ulcers is negligible, patient falls low, and no catastrophic falls (ie fractures) for many months and medication errors with nursing staff remain trivial in nature and low in numbers.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#20
The probem is people are much more crocked up and or obese as well so it takes two to wash a person medication takes two and takes a lot of time add obs and writing up notes your rapidly running out of people and time.

Some nursing tasks do take degree level training nurses are now doing stuff that was done by doctors but you now have hca's doing nursing tasks that are not fully trained.
basic nursing needs lots of people and a good leader without enough bodies things go to ratshit regardless how good the staff are.
Until quite recently a Consultant Psychiatrist did my job.
 

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