Tonight I cooked..........

Kirkz

LE
Bacon and cheese panini with English mustard and mayo.

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Loadsa sh1t in that mix... all you should need is brown sugar, coarse salt, coriander seeds, black pepper and vinegar. You can use Coke (I would advise against South American marching powders) as well.

What is more important is that you dry it properly. In Pomland it's harder than in Seffrica due to the temperature and humidity.
Wouldn't worry about the Coke too much. More for marinades. Bit of Worcestershire and balsamic vinegar with some crushed birds eye chili and salt for overnight brining also does the trick, along with the other ingredients you listed rubbed on and then layered for a few hours to allow the flavour to get in there before hanging to dry.

Cold temps are OK but humidity can be a problem, hence keeping a careful eye on things in summer on the highveld. Best solution is constant airflow. Helps to dry it and keeps the flies off. Decent fan will do the trick, along with a well ventilated room.
 
Loadsa sh1t in that mix... all you should need is brown sugar, coarse salt, coriander seeds, black pepper and vinegar. You can use Coke (I would advise against South American marching powders) as well.

What is more important is that you dry it properly. In Pomland it's harder than in Seffrica due to the temperature and humidity.
Well I am going to give it a go. My own attempts have had very mixed results indeed, apart from when I got some mix from The Biltong Box which was great, but it no longer exists. I dry it in an Andrew James food dehydrater.
 
Sunday supper

Lamb shank, roasted veg
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Tool

LE
Wouldn't worry about the Coke too much. More for marinades. Bit of Worcestershire and balsamic vinegar with some crushed birds eye chili and salt for overnight brining also does the trick, along with the other ingredients you listed rubbed on and then layered for a few hours to allow the flavour to get in there before hanging to dry.

Cold temps are OK but humidity can be a problem, hence keeping a careful eye on things in summer on the highveld. Best solution is constant airflow. Helps to dry it and keeps the flies off. Decent fan will do the trick, along with a well ventilated room.
About 3 measures vinegar (balsamic or white wine) to 1 measure Worcestershire sauce, with about a 1/2teaspoon chili should be fine. The airflow is more important.
Well I am going to give it a go. My own attempts have had very mixed results indeed, apart from when I got some mix from The Biltong Box which was great, but it no longer exists. I dry it in an Andrew James food dehydrater.
Cheat - but it would work. The issue I find with dehydraters is that you can lose some of the flavour that develops over time (3-5 days in Seffrica, 7-10 days in Pomland for natural drying). Keep us updated please.
 
About 3 measures vinegar (balsamic or white wine) to 1 measure Worcestershire sauce, with about a 1/2teaspoon chili should be fine. The airflow is more important.

Cheat - but it would work. The issue I find with dehydraters is that you can lose some of the flavour that develops over time (3-5 days in Seffrica, 7-10 days in Pomland for natural drying). Keep us updated please.
Yup. Good quality fan does the job as mentioned. Trick is to keep the air moving.

I'd have around 50/50 balsamic and worcestershire, diluted with a bit of malt vinegar and a drop of water with a little salt, cayenne and chili flake. Best to play with it until you find a mix you like. The other stuff like pepper, coarse salt, coriander and a bit of ground cumin and clove can be added as a rub before hanging.
 
About 3 measures vinegar (balsamic or white wine) to 1 measure Worcestershire sauce, with about a 1/2teaspoon chili should be fine. The airflow is more important.

Cheat - but it would work. The issue I find with dehydraters is that you can lose some of the flavour that develops over time (3-5 days in Seffrica, 7-10 days in Pomland for natural drying). Keep us updated please.
I will keep you posted. To be honest, I got bored of turning perfectly good meat into salt blocks so I thought a return to a premixed spice was due, until it turned up I wasn't aware of the full ingredients - palm oil and so on. But its paid for and it would be waste not to try it.
 
This is how we learn. It's nothing like those blokes who have a sausage recipe they stick to come hell or high water, refusing to allow any new ideas in.

Tweak the recipe, play with it, see if you prefer to add something else, pre brine the meat, perhaps dip in malt vinegar before hanging. Taste it and see if there's something else you can do to make it better/different. A mate's wife does dried sausage (boerewors) with red wine and brandy - tres lush!
 

Kirkz

LE
Tonight was Farm Foods bin rump steak, chips, egg, black pudding and mushrooms.

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The kale experiment part 2, this time with sausages. The kale was definitely better being cooked over a higher heat for a bit longer than yesterday. Gravy added after the picture was taken as I forgot until I sat down and realised something was missing.

kale.jpg


Colonial types, what are collard greens? They look sort of like kale / cabbage when I see them on telly.
 
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The kale experiment part 2, this time with sausages. The kale was definitely better being cooked over a higher heat for a bit longer than yesterday. Gravy added after the picture was taken as I forgot until I sat down and realised something was missing.

View attachment 489249

Colonial types, what are collard greens? They look sort of like kale / cabbage when I see them on telly.
Goes well in dahl - channa especially.
 
The kale experiment part 2, this time with sausages. The kale was definitely better being cooked over a higher heat for a bit longer than yesterday. Gravy added after the picture was taken as I forgot until I sat down and realised something was missing.

View attachment 489249

Colonial types, what are collard greens? They look sort of like kale / cabbage when I see them on telly.
Collards are just leaves. Three things:

1. They’re like cabbage, but without a “head”, just the peripheral leaves. They can be very dark green, strong taste.
2. They were historically slave food. There’s a stereotype of fried chicken and watermelon, and you can put Collards in with them too.
3. They’re lush :)

Collards, cabbage, mustard greens, turnip greens, kale, much alike. But I like Collards best.
 
The kale experiment part 2, this time with sausages. The kale was definitely better being cooked over a higher heat for a bit longer than yesterday. Gravy added after the picture was taken as I forgot until I sat down and realised something was missing.

View attachment 489249

Colonial types, what are collard greens? They look sort of like kale / cabbage when I see them on telly.
Collards are a loose leafy vegetable that is in the same family of brassicas as kale, spring greens, cabbage, broccoli, etc. Brassicas are actually in the mustard family of plants, and are sometimes known as cole crops, from the Latin "caulis" for the stem of the plants, that designation being from whence coleslaw gets its name.

I tend mix my greens when cooking them up. My typical collard greens will include collards, mustard greens, and poke sallet, often with a bit of spinach thrown in as well. Also, fairly traditional when cooking down your greens to throw in a nice ham hock, or some pork belly. Poke sallet is not a brassica, it is a phytolacca, and poisonous to mammals, but great for attracting birds. You have to pick poke sallet early in the spring, and prepare it properly not to off yourself.
 
And, I really shouldn't bother, but tonight's special, weighing a bit over a kilo...

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A prime ribeye steak with a bit of horseradish.
 

Tool

LE
This is how we learn. It's nothing like those blokes who have a sausage recipe they stick to come hell or high water, refusing to allow any new ideas in.

Tweak the recipe, play with it, see if you prefer to add something else, pre brine the meat, perhaps dip in malt vinegar before hanging. Taste it and see if there's something else you can do to make it better/different. A mate's wife does dried sausage (boerewors) with red wine and brandy - tres lush!
Droewors, Shirley? Must admit to having never tried brandy in wors, although red wine does make a difference.
 
Correct. Pretty much what droewors is. Boerie with a slightly lower fat content.

Mate has a farm at Swakop and pots the occasional oryx for the pot, most of which his ntombezaan turns into boerie. The red wine and brandy thing is her own recipe, along with the sweetness of balsamic and gives it a really good flavour dried. The addition of spek to make fat juicy boerie for the braai is even better, but less convenient than the dried stuff.
 
Collards are a loose leafy vegetable that is in the same family of brassicas as kale, spring greens, cabbage, broccoli, etc. Brassicas are actually in the mustard family of plants, and are sometimes known as cole crops, from the Latin "caulis" for the stem of the plants, that designation being from whence coleslaw gets its name.

I tend mix my greens when cooking them up. My typical collard greens will include collards, mustard greens, and poke sallet, often with a bit of spinach thrown in as well. Also, fairly traditional when cooking down your greens to throw in a nice ham hock, or some pork belly. Poke sallet is not a brassica, it is a phytolacca, and poisonous to mammals, but great for attracting birds. You have to pick poke sallet early in the spring, and prepare it properly not to off yourself.
I had always thought that was "polk salad" as in the Elvis song Polk Salad Annie.

I think the various types of cabbage tend to be under-rated in the scoff stakes. I imagine mostly because of the way the poor little things were cooked by our female forebears,, schools, the armed forces and various other institutions. Boiled for nine hours.

I only found out cabbage was green in my early twenties. Thanks for all the grey slop Mum.
 

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