Tonight I cooked..........

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer

Kirkz

LE
7 sausages for Christ's sake.
Heresy at the highest military culinary level.
I thought the 1 sausage rule was only at breakfast so there were sausages left over for sausage casserole at lunch where you could have 7 sausages.
 
I thought the 1 sausage rule was only at breakfast so there were sausages left over for sausage casserole at lunch where you could have 7 sausages.
You might be right.
I always assumed the 1 sausage rule to be across the board and to be honest I don't remember encountering sausages at lunch or dinner in the cookhouse.
I do like the idea of 7 sausages mind.
 
Simple: There are no nouns that begin with ß.
I know that, but when a word is capitalized, like Straße, it becomes STRASSE. There’s no Scharfes-S in upper case, and it’s wrong to write STRAßE.

I also seem to remember from my Army German courses that when capitalising, you can omit the umlauts entirely. May have misremembered that bit.
 
For a language and erm, Volk so rooted in discipline and regulation, why is it that when capitalized, there is no ß ?
Simple: There are no nouns that begin with ß.
I struggle with Yorkshire puddings. By far the best ones I ever had were made by my dad, a one eyed retired miner.
My mum gave up making them because his were vastly superior, and we all complained if she made them.
Without bigging up, my yorkshires are brill. I don't really have a calculated recipe, it's a bit more, "That's about the right amount". Surprisingly they always work and are delicious.
 

gorillaguts981

War Hero
Despite my wife being an ex-chef, her Yorkshires are flat and pathetic. Mine come up lovely and nut brown with just the right amount of soft base. Equal quantities of plain flour, eggs and milk well beaten and left to stand for 20 minutes or so. Lard in a pan and into a 200 deg C oven until it's smoking hot. Beat the batter again and into the pan. Cook until wonderful. Never had a failure.
 

Kirkz

LE
Despite my wife being an ex-chef, her Yorkshires are flat and pathetic. Mine come up lovely and nut brown with just the right amount of soft base. Equal quantities of plain flour, eggs and milk well beaten and left to stand for 20 minutes or so. Lard in a pan and into a 200 deg C oven until it's smoking hot. Beat the batter again and into the pan. Cook until wonderful. Never had a failure.
One of the first things my mum did when baking anything was weigh the eggs.
 
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Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
Despite my wife being an ex-chef, her Yorkshires are flat and pathetic. Mine come up lovely and nut brown with just the right amount of soft base. Equal quantities of plain flour, eggs and milk well beaten and left to stand for 20 minutes or so. Lard in a pan and into a 200 deg C oven until it's smoking hot. Beat the batter again and into the pan. Cook until wonderful. Never had a failure.
So 2 eggs, 2 flours and 2 milks then?

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I struggle with Yorkshire puddings. By far the best ones I ever had were made by my dad, a one eyed retired miner.
My mum gave up making them because his were vastly superior, and we all complained if she made them.
Equal quantities by volume of eggs, flour and milk. Hot oven, 210* c, put the pan in the oven when the joint/chicken comes out, get the oil/fat smoking hot. In your own time, carry on.
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
Equal quantities by volume of eggs, flour and milk. Hot oven, 210* c, put the pan in the oven when the joint/chicken comes out, get the oil/fat smoking hot. In your own time, carry on.
To my mind, Yorkshire puddings should fill the plate and be filled with onion gravy made with the juices from meat. After that one has a course of meat/veg.
Those silly little things called Yorkshire puddings always seem like some sort of Waitrose affectation for the south.
 
To my mind, Yorkshire puddings should fill the plate and be filled with onion gravy made with the juices from meat. After that one has a course of meat/veg.
Those silly little things called Yorkshire puddings always seem like some sort of Waitrose affectation for the south.
This.

Whenever we went to my Grandparents as a child, Yorkshire Pudding was a starter. 1 huge one, cooked in a large, cast iron meat roasting tin, and divided up. I've never tasted anything close to them since she passed away.

My Grandad would have some cold, for supper with jam spread on - also delicious.

But them I'm a Yorkshireman, so a bit biased!
 
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Kirkz

LE
This.

Whenever we went to my Grandparents as a child, Yorkshire Pudding was a starter. 1 huge one, cooked in a large, cast iron meat roasting tin, and divided up. I've never tasted anything close to them since she passed away.

My Grandad would have some cold, for supper with jam spread on - also delicious.

But them I'm a Yorkshireman, so a bit biased!
My bold.
I'm guessing the reason you've not tasted anything like them since is because your grandparents probably cooked the Yorkshire in either beef dripping or the fat from the sunday roast.
Because over the last 30 years or so fat has become a dirty word in cooking most people don't use it anymore.
 
My bold.
I'm guessing the reason you've not tasted anything like them since is because your grandparents probably cooked the Yorkshire in either beef dripping or the fat from the sunday roast.
Because over the last 30 years or so fat has become a dirty word in cooking most people don't use it anymore.
Absolutely spot on. Beef dripping, from the lard used to cook the beef.
 

Kirkz

LE
One of the first things my mum did when baking anything was weigh the eggs.
I know it's bad form to quote yourself but I wanted to add to this.
Something else my Mum always did when baking, particularly sponge cakes was to use the same weight of eggs, flour,sugar and butter, then when cooking she would take them out and listen to them.
If she could hear it bubbling it wasn't done so put it back in the oven for a bit longer.
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
Mmmmmm. Reminds me immediately of beef dripping on fresh bread or toast.
Mucky fat as my old mum used to call it. Absolutely delicious with salt on.

People would be horrified at eating it now. Although you can buy it in my local butchers, about £3 for a small tub!
 

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