Tonight I cooked..........

Goat ribs....
C55A78AF-FB46-4239-B1C0-7B5DE2EC31A4.jpeg
 
A reasonable sized chunk of salmon. I was going to have half tonight and half tomorrow with some potatoes and veg.

That plan fell down slightly when I got back in from a walk, cooked the salmon and thought "I'll just have a bit while I'm sorting the veg". I have now eaten all of the salmon. Still not cooked veg.
 

Kirkz

LE
A reasonable sized chunk of salmon. I was going to have half tonight and half tomorrow with some potatoes and veg.

That plan fell down slightly when I got back in from a walk, cooked the salmon and thought "I'll just have a bit while I'm sorting the veg". I have now eaten all of the salmon. Still not cooked veg.
Your bogs going to suffer tomorrow.
 
Different world back then. Pyro was not frowned on in the way it would be today. Boys will be boys etc. All of us had dads in the Army so it was almost de rigeur.

I would get banged up nowadays if I was caught making and cracking off remotely detonated petrol bombs.

Happy daze.
When I was about 11 or so, my two mates and I made several batches of gunpowder. It burned, fizzed and flashed OK, but we couldn't make the explosions we wanted. We had no understanding of the need to contain the charge in a vessel of some kind and there was no internet in them thar days. Good job really, we would probably have either died or been missing something critical by tea time.

Question for @Roadster280 or anyone else with a Weber gas grill.

Before I put my Genesis away in the Autumn I gave it a good clean. Today, in preparation for a non-essential BBQ at the weekend, I dragged it out to give a quick once over. To my absolute horror there was a distinct mould growing in some areas of the insides. That hasn't happened before, but I'm guessing it wasn't properly de-greased. I cleaned it thoroughly again today and fired it up for an hour on 300 Deg to kill anything that might be left. The questions is: How do you go about de-gunging your gas grills so that doesn't happen?
 
When I was about 11 or so, my two mates and I made several batches of gunpowder. It burned, fizzed and flashed OK, but we couldn't make the explosions we wanted. We had no understanding of the need to contain the charge in a vessel of some kind and there was no internet in them thar days. Good job really, we would probably have either died or been missing something critical by tea time.

Question for @Roadster280 or anyone else with a Weber gas grill.

Before I put my Genesis away in the Autumn I gave it a good clean. Today, in preparation for a non-essential BBQ at the weekend, I dragged it out to give a quick once over. To my absolute horror there was a distinct mould growing in some areas of the insides. That hasn't happened before, but I'm guessing it wasn't properly de-greased. I cleaned it thoroughly again today and fired it up for an hour on 300 Deg to kill anything that might be left. The questions is: How do you go about de-gunging your gas grills so that doesn't happen?
Once, maybe twice a year, I take it apart. Warming rack out, grates out, flavorizer bars out, heat deflectors out. Large drip pan out. Put all of it, body included, on a tarp on an area that I don’t walk on. Spray all with degreaser, leave for 20 mins or so. Then pressure wash the shit out of them. Put the large drip pan back in, then spray the body of it and the inside of the lid with degreaser. Another 20 mins. Then pressure wash the shit out of the main body. Let it dry. Using compressed air or a fine brush, clean the gas nozzles (not easily removable). Reassemble. Run at max chat for 20 mins. Scrub the grates and warming rack with a brass grill brush. Sorted. Mine’s probably 7 or 8 years old now, and it’s done ok.

Contrast with a kettle or Kamado grill. Max load of charcoal, burn at 750+ F, all fat & carbon goes away. Brush residue off. Done.

The real problem with gas bbqs is that the fat and food residue remain inside the body of the grill, rather than dropping directly on the heat source and being burnt off at source. For indirect cooking on kettles/kamadoes, the fat & shit drops into a drip tray directly below the grate, not below the burners and heat deflectors.

I like my Genesis, but more from a convenience perspective, than a performance/flavour or cleaning perspective.

I guess I’m lucky in that I have a covered deck, so I grill all year round, and the mould doesn’t appear, but certainly have had that problem in the past.
 
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Once, maybe twice a year, I take it apart. Warming rack out, grates out, flavorizer bars out, heat deflectors out. Large drip pan out. Put all of it, body included, on a tarp on an area that I don’t walk on. Spray all with degreaser, leave for 20 mins or so. Then pressure wash the shit out of them. Put the large drip pan back in, then spray the body of it and the inside of the lid with degreaser. Another 20 mins. Then pressure wash the shit out of the main body. Let it dry. Using compressed air or a fine brush, clean the gas nozzles (not easily removable). Reassemble. Run at max chat for 20 mins. Scrub the grates and warming rack with a brass grill brush. Sorted. Mine’s probably 7 or 8 years old now, and it’s done ok.

Contrast with a kettle or Kamado grill. Max load of charcoal, burn at 750+ F, all fat & carbon goes away. Brush residue off. Done.

The real problem with gas bbqs is that the fat and food residue remain inside the body of the grill, rather than dropping directly on the heat source and being burnt off at source. For indirect cooking, the fat & shit drops into a drip tray directly below the grate, not below the burners and heat deflectors.

I like my Genesis, but more from a convenience perspective, than a performance/flavour or cleaning perspective.

I guess I’m lucky in that I have a covered deck, so I grill all year round, and the mould doesn’t appear, but certainly have had that problem in the past.
Cheers for that.

I have a pressure washer, but was concerned that I might damage the gas burners or sparker if I used it inside the main body. We also have a small steam cleaner with a fine nozzle. I reckon I'll give that a go in the awkward corners next time round. Up to now I have used de-greaser on the removable parts, but a wire brush, scrubbing brushes and hot soapy water inside the main body. Didn't have this problem last year.

It's gleaming now though.
 
3
Cheers for that.

I have a pressure washer, but was concerned that I might damage the gas burners or sparker if I used it inside the main body. We also have a small steam cleaner with a fine nozzle. I reckon I'll give that a go in the awkward corners next time round. Up to now I have used de-greaser on the removable parts, but a wire brush, scrubbing brushes and hot soapy water inside the main body. Didn't have this problem last year.

It's gleaming now though.
Just make sure you wear old clothes. You’re going to get minging, lots of concave surface to blow back.

Maybe you have the same option, but I dick my 17 yr old to do it now :)
 
3


Just make sure you wear old clothes. You’re going to get minging, lots of concave surface to blow back.

Maybe you have the same option, but I dick my 17 yr old to do it now :)
It's just like using my Kaercher on the terraced area. I bought a pair of workman's trousers a few years ago and I still have my old Goretex suit from the army. Perfect.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Don’t think so but one of the best weddings I ever went to was in Andover. Greenie, Brian N. Married your mate John L’s daughter.
I am informed that was one L of a do.

They are still happily together, too.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
When I was about 11 or so, my two mates and I made several batches of gunpowder. It burned, fizzed and flashed OK, but we couldn't make the explosions we wanted. We had no understanding of the need to contain the charge in a vessel of some kind and there was no internet in them thar days. Good job really, we would probably have either died or been missing something critical by tea time.

Question for @Roadster280 or anyone else with a Weber gas grill.

Before I put my Genesis away in the Autumn I gave it a good clean. Today, in preparation for a non-essential BBQ at the weekend, I dragged it out to give a quick once over. To my absolute horror there was a distinct mould growing in some areas of the insides. That hasn't happened before, but I'm guessing it wasn't properly de-greased. I cleaned it thoroughly again today and fired it up for an hour on 300 Deg to kill anything that might be left. The questions is: How do you go about de-gunging your gas grills so that doesn't happen?
I never used to bother. Just heat it really hot to kill everything before first use.

Signed.
Miss Lazybones
 
My death row meal, with the addition of a slice or 2 of white bread for chip butties!
Mine too, but hold the beans and give me a pint of cold milk on the side
 
I never used to bother. Just heat it really hot to kill everything before first use.

Signed.
Miss Lazybones
Well, it's their own fault for catching the ghey and using gas. Bad enough they use those Weber and associated generic disasters.
 
US butter is generally whiter in hue but real butter elsewhere is a creamier yellow colour.

But you knew that didn't you?
Well there's butter, and there's butter.

Throughout continental Europe, cultured butter is preferred, while sweet cream butter dominates in the United States and the United Kingdom. Cultured butter is sometimes labeled "European-style" butter in the United States, although cultured butter is made and sold by some, especially Amish, dairies. Commercial raw cream butter is virtually unheard-of in the United States. Raw cream butter is generally only found made at home by consumers who have purchased raw whole milk directly from dairy farmers, skimmed the cream themselves, and made butter with it. It is rare in Europe as well
 
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