Tonight I cooked..........

Morrisons on-line flogging lamb shoulder for £4kg, down from £8kg.

Dusted off the old Römer topf.


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Lamb shoulder with freshly chopped sage, rosemary and thyme plus salt and pepper rubbed on the fat & flesh.

Then squeezed the juice of a lemon over, drizzled a tbsp of honey then some olive oil.

Tucked in the carrots, celery stalks and spuds & served with a glass, or 2, of Chianti Riserva, I still couldn't resist adding some mint sauce but it really wasn't needed.
 

Kirkz

LE
That looks really nice apart from one thing...Celery. Why on earth would you add bitter celery to something so delicious?
Celery is a basic stock vegetable along with onion and carrot it's used in lots of stew, casserole, mince recipes.
 
Morrisons on-line flogging lamb shoulder for £4kg, down from £8kg.

Dusted off the old Römer topf.


View attachment 451453

View attachment 451456


View attachment 451458


Lamb shoulder with freshly chopped sage, rosemary and thyme plus salt and pepper rubbed on the fat & flesh.

Then squeezed the juice of a lemon over, drizzled a tbsp of honey then some olive oil.

Tucked in the carrots, celery stalks and spuds & served with a glass, or 2, of Chianti Riserva, I still couldn't resist adding some mint sauce but it really wasn't needed.
Excellent...apart from one small detail...

Carrot discipline. You should have trimmed the bottom "surplus" off the right hand one and placed atop, and in between the carrots.

As ever though - an excellent submission by you. I'm interested in this Romertopf thing...never heard of one/it. What is it?
 
Celery is a basic stock vegetable along with onion and carrot it's used in lots of stew, casserole, mince recipes.
I get that, I just don't like the taste. I'm sure I could achieve the same result with either leeks or onions. On the other hand I'm not an accomplished chef, so that could be complete bolleaux.
 
Excellent...apart from one small detail...

Carrot discipline. You should have trimmed the bottom "surplus" off the right hand one and placed atop, and in between the carrots.

As ever though - an excellent submission by you. I'm interested in this Romertopf thing...never heard of one/it. What is it?
It's German for Roman pot, they were all the rage in the Fatherland in the 70's, and are still going strong now.
Sold then in 3 sizes, small, medium or large chicken size, hence the chicken embossed on the top.

A porous clay pot, you have to soak the two halves in cold water for about 20 minutes before use.

Then lob in the chicken/meat and stuff spuds and root veg around the meat, add salt & pepper etc., but no oil normally.

Bung in a cold oven, gradually start with a very low heat, increased every 5 mins or so until, for a chicken about 180C is reached, it will then happily sit for 1 to 1 1/2 hours, at which point the bird will be poached, but also browned, as will the spuds etc.

The water in the pots steams the food without needing fat.

Their website has descriptions in English with lots of recipes but I've only every used it for chicken etc.


ETA Mine is 45 years old, and, as it should be is only cleaned with a soft brush in warm water - positively no washing up liquid, which is is why is has developed a patina, rather than being in shit-state.

No doubt most matelots would lob it overboard rather than clean it. :-D
 
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It's German for Roman pot, they were all the rage in the Fatherland in the 70's, and are still going strong now.
Sold then in 3 sizes, small, medium or large chicken size, hence the chicken embossed on the top.

A porous clay pot, you have to soak the two halves in cold water for about 20 minutes before use.

Then lob in the chicken/meat and stuff spuds and root veg around the meat, add salt & pepper etc., but no oil normally.

Bung in a cold oven, gradually start with a very low heat, increased every 5 mins or so until, for a chicken about 180C is reached, it will then happily sit for 1 to 1 1/2 hours, at which point the bird will be poached, but also browned, as will the spuds etc.

The water in the pots steams the food without needing fat.

Their website has descriptions in English with lots of recipes but I've only every used it for chicken etc.

Cheers mate!
 
I get that, I just don't like the taste. I'm sure I could achieve the same result with either leeks or onions. On the other hand I'm not an accomplished chef, so that could be complete bolleaux.
You could use leeks instead but if you've ever eaten a 'proper' meat ragu, (normally bastardised as Bolognese sauce), then it will have been based on very finely chopped onions, carrots and celery, very, very gently cooked in olive oil for up to 3 hours or more until the veg effectively dissolves.

If not, then use onion, carrots and leeks, it will still taste good.
 
You might want to amend that comment when you read the bit that I added after you read it. :-D

Nah...you spoke the truth!

Plymouth dockyard and the Sound is covered in crockery/tie-wraps and old shackles.

Pompey probably not so..don't think Pompey matelots were trusted with crockery..they got the "in flight meal" plates.
 
Between me and you, I haven't a fecking clue. Just that I've seen SWMBO chuck it in before. She adds it to Spaghetti Bollock Naked, and other stuff.

To be honest the celery takes on the flavour of everything else, so you cant really taste it. It just adds a bit of texture, and sometimes crunch depending on how long you have cooked it for.
Celery carrot and onion are the holy trinity of Italian cooking hence why in ragu etc
 
A cheese and salad sandwich, made with Chleb Zytni (Polish Rye Bread)

IMG_6159.jpeg
 
It's German for Roman pot, they were all the rage in the Fatherland in the 70's, and are still going strong now.
Sold then in 3 sizes, small, medium or large chicken size, hence the chicken embossed on the top.

A porous clay pot, you have to soak the two halves in cold water for about 20 minutes before use.

Then lob in the chicken/meat and stuff spuds and root veg around the meat, add salt & pepper etc., but no oil normally.

Bung in a cold oven, gradually start with a very low heat, increased every 5 mins or so until, for a chicken about 180C is reached, it will then happily sit for 1 to 1 1/2 hours, at which point the bird will be poached, but also browned, as will the spuds etc.

The water in the pots steams the food without needing fat.

Their website has descriptions in English with lots of recipes but I've only every used it for chicken etc.


ETA Mine is 45 years old, and, as it should be is only cleaned with a soft brush in warm water - positively no washing up liquid, which is is why is has developed a patina, rather than being in shit-state.

No doubt most matelots would lob it overboard rather than clean it. :-D
Later evolving to the very popular Habitat Chicken Brick of the 70’s.
 
A cheese and salad sandwich, made with Chleb Zytni (Polish Rye Bread)

View attachment 451349
Looks.....interesting. Can you tell us what cheese you used and what choices of salad you chose. Also how does the Polish Rye Bread taste? Is is similar to the German Schwarz Bröt?
 
Celery carrot and onion are the holy trinity of Italian cooking hence why in ragu etc
Spot on.

Chopped onions, carrots and celery is called battuto and after cooking in olive oil it becomes soffrito which is the base for nearly every pasta sauce. It varies a bit with/without garlic, shallots and leeks.

There are variants of soffrito all over the Med.

My father in law was a Chindit Walt and refused to eat garlic. When I cooked a bollocknees I would stick a bulb of garlic in it. He wolfed it down and usually said it tasted much better without garlic. Twat.
 
Looks.....interesting. Can you tell us what cheese you used and what choices of salad you chose. Also how does the Polish Rye Bread taste? Is is similar to the German Schwarz Bröt?

English cheddar
sliced spring onion
little gem lettuce (2 leaves)

The Ry Bread is only 17% rye, but it gives it flavour and not at all like German Swaraz Brot (that is a good bread also, but stronger).
 

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