Tonight I cooked..........

I think that among all the gash trendy serving platters (tiles, jam jars, flat caps, buckets, spades etc) serving cold meats, cheese, bread etc on a board is fine so cut MD a bit of slack here.

I had a starter of cold meats etc once at a restaurant in France. It was listed on the menu as “assiette anglaise” (English plate). Oddly enough it was served on a wooden board and had nothing English on it. Go figure.
I read somewhere that although the WWII GIs used to call condoms "French letters", the French slang for them was "Chapeau Anglais" (English cap).
 
Not difficult. Wooden board = English (according to the French).
As in 'boarding house', from the days when Joe Average didn't own crockery, and/or keepers of taverns, inns, hostels etcetera weren't inclined to spend money on breakables, so most meals were served on wooden platters, known colloquially as boards (cf. RN-speak, where said boards were square in shape with a raised rim, and Matelots expected the duty slopjockey to pack the things with scoff to the very corners).

So - possibly very English indeed.
 
As in 'boarding house', from the days when Joe Average didn't own crockery, and/or keepers of taverns, inns, hostels etcetera weren't inclined to spend money on breakables, so most meals were served on wooden platters, known colloquially as boards (cf. RN-speak, where said boards were square in shape with a raised rim, and Matelots expected the duty slopjockey to pack the things with scoff to the very corners).

So - possibly very English indeed.
I’m not convinced by that. I think “board” and “boarding” more generally refer to providing accommodation and meals. Thus “boarding school”.

Didn’t Brits used to eat off metal plates? And trenchers, which were basically bread plates holding all the scoff(think large filled Yorkshire’s). Thus giving us the word trencherman (for the greedy bastard who ate the plate as well as the scoff in it).
 
Last night’s haggis, neeps and tatties:

DDF436D0-1DB9-4E3B-9B5A-C21BB74AF306.jpeg

Gravy applied later...
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Looks like my parents’ original one, wedding present from 1967 or so. It was updated on their silver wedding but they didn’t feel need after that.

It’s funny looking at the changes in food between the editions. Tempted to start a collection just of Good Housekeeping!
Mother gave it to me when I left home on 1979. It got damaged in a washing machine flooding incident in 1980 and has got worse since. I was given a new version in about 1990 but some of the best recipes were gone or changed, so I kept the old one, despite half the index being missing, as well as some of the pages.

A collection of versions is an idea I have had for a while now. Once I have space again.
 
I’m not convinced by that. I think “board” and “boarding” more generally refer to providing accommodation and meals. Thus “boarding school”
Board = 1500s,
Boarding Skule = 1670s

A century and a half of shifting meanings.

That said, it looks like I was incorrect, for different reasons:

 
Your Good Housekeeping book is in too good condition. I will post a pic of mine !View attachment 445882View attachment 445883View attachment 445884
A little worse than my copy of Mrs Beeton. I can’t remember where I got it, but the spine is banjaxed. It has a couple of page markers in it that date it As well as the issue date, 1972. It’s nearly 50.



EE53E81D-991F-4B68-9ECF-880885881CC7.jpeg

17778B01-D217-4C14-AB29-320FA2757A0D.jpeg

Firstly a newspaper page with some bird smoking Players No 6:

89244AF1-A328-4763-AD93-C407808E83EB.jpeg


For those that were in the northwest in the 70s/80s, a “Reeces” bag. Reeces was a chain of High St bakeries. Probably some of them will be Gregg’s now:

0F3037F5-4856-4F8E-B15F-959F64065317.jpeg
 
To confuse the issue even further whilst trenchers were originally made out of bread they were gradually replaced by wooden plates and the name was carried over.

What @Roadster280 makes are trenchers, with the round bit meant for salt. If he wants to rebadge his products as Ye Olde English Trenchers the usual marketing/branding consultancy fee applies.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
A little worse than my copy of Mrs Beeton. I can’t remember where I got it, but the spine is banjaxed. It has a couple of page markers in it that date it As well as the issue date, 1972. It’s nearly 50.



View attachment 445916
View attachment 445917
Firstly a newspaper page with some bird smoking Players No 6:

View attachment 445915

For those that were in the northwest in the 70s/80s, a “Reeces” bag. Reeces was a chain of High St bakeries. Probably some of them will be Gregg’s now:

View attachment 445918
Looks remarkably like mother's Mrs. Beeton given to her as a Wedding Present in 1955 and taken to every kitchen in every MQ and private hiring they occupied, still in use in retirement.
 
To confuse the issue even further whilst trenchers were originally made out of bread they were gradually replaced by wooden plates and the name was carried over.

What @Roadster280 makes are trenchers, with the round bit meant for salt. If he wants to rebadge his products as Ye Olde English Trenchers the usual marketing/branding consultancy fee applies.
Actually I rarely make ones with grooves, they’re a pain in the arrse.

As I’ve discovered, what I invariably make is ornaments. I‘ve been giving them away as presents for weddings, Christmas, etc for the last 10 years or so. Whenever we visit a recipient (sometime later), it’s in the China cabinet or on a dresser. “Oh, we keep that for best, it’s too nice to use”. FFS, why did I bother? :)
 
Well, as its chilly outside, damp chill that is, I decided to cook lobscouse.
Basically, its a mutton stew with the cheapest cuts of meat. Allegedly brought to Liverpool by Scandinavian sailors, where it became so popular that it might be the origin of the word to describe Liverpudlians. "Scouse", that is, not the other one.
So what went into it - Scrag end of neck of lamb - I chopped up a big brown onion, a massive leek, 3 big carrots, two potatoes and a clove of garlic. Fry up the onions, garlic, leek until onions lightly brown and put to one side. Sear the meat to seal in the juices. Put the whole lot in a big pot and cover with stock ( 1 cube beef, 1 cube lamb ) and let it go on a gentle simmer fro a few hours - until the meat falls off the bone. Some peeps add a pinch of pepper ( bugger that, hardly taste it , make it a teaspoons worth or add a chilli - enough to give it "warmth" if you know what I mean, but don't go mad ). Serve piping hot with a hunk of warm bread. Great for those days when even the dog wouldn't take you out for a walk.
 
Well, as its chilly outside, damp chill that is, I decided to cook lobscouse.
Basically, its a mutton stew with the cheapest cuts of meat. Allegedly brought to Liverpool by Scandinavian sailors, where it became so popular that it might be the origin of the word to describe Liverpudlians. "Scouse", that is, not the other one.
So what went into it - Scrag end of neck of lamb - I chopped up a big brown onion, a massive leek, 3 big carrots, two potatoes and a clove of garlic. Fry up the onions, garlic, leek until onions lightly brown and put to one side. Sear the meat to seal in the juices. Put the whole lot in a big pot and cover with stock ( 1 cube beef, 1 cube lamb ) and let it go on a gentle simmer fro a few hours - until the meat falls off the bone. Some peeps add a pinch of pepper ( bugger that, hardly taste it , make it a teaspoons worth or add a chilli - enough to give it "warmth" if you know what I mean, but don't go mad ). Serve piping hot with a hunk of warm bread. Great for those days when even the dog wouldn't take you out for a walk.
Growing up in that area, we had that maybe once a fortnight. With reference to ”the other one”, I think I’ll make a cottage pie with leftover meat this evening or tomorrow - thus not a true cottage pie. I’m thinking of calling it “Best team in the world pie” :)
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
Actually I rarely make ones with grooves, they’re a pain in the arrse.

As I’ve discovered, what I invariably make is ornaments. I‘ve been giving them away as presents for weddings, Christmas, etc for the last 10 years or so. Whenever we visit a recipient (sometime later), it’s in the China cabinet or on a dresser. “Oh, we keep that for best, it’s too nice to use”. FFS, why did I bother? :)
Serious question but what wood do you use to make your boards?
 

Kirkz

LE
Serious question but what wood do you use to make your boards?
Butchers blocks and chopping boards are usually beech wood as it has natural antibacterial properties.
 
Serious question but what wood do you use to make your boards?
The true answer to that is “whatever I have on hand at the time”. It has to be hard wood (not just “hardwood”), but “hard” wood. Poplar, for instance is defined as a hardwood, but is in fact not all that durable. Usually maple around the outside, and cherry, walnut or red oak for colour variation in the middle bit. I’ve used hickory and white oak in the past too.

I’ll try mahogany in the next couple months too. I was given some very nice mahogany boards a couple years back, and now I’ve got my shop back up and running, that will become a bookcase. The offcuts will go into a couple chopping boards.

The key to it is the sanding. Cutting and gluing is straightforward, but sanding it is tedious. Thus my latest acquisition - a used industrial dual drum sander for pennies on the dollar. This should make it easy enough to make them for profit. Just need to hoik it into my basement and get it set up. Possibly today :)

0B95A888-22B3-461E-84D4-E6D32596C320.jpeg
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
Butchers blocks and chopping boards are usually beech wood as it has natural antibacterial properties.
And pine, apparently. I was always surprised about the antiseptic properties of oak when considering that it was used almost exclusively for beer (and other) barrels at one time.
 
And pine, apparently. I was always surprised about the antiseptic properties of oak when considering that it was used almost exclusively for beer (and other) barrels at one time.
There’s a sawmill close to me that apparently produces 90% of the oak used in the whiskey industry in the US. They don’t do any cooperage themselves, but supply the wood, pre-shaped. The place is a hovel. Big pile of logs on one side, huge open-sided shed in the middle of a sea of mud, semi trailers on the other side.

I’m in the wrong business, if they have 90% of the market.
 
The true answer to that is “whatever I have on hand at the time”. It has to be hard wood (not just “hardwood”), but “hard” wood. Poplar, for instance is defined as a hardwood, but is in fact not all that durable. Usually maple around the outside, and cherry, walnut or red oak for colour variation in the middle bit. I’ve used hickory and white oak in the past too.

I’ll try mahogany in the next couple months too. I was given some very nice mahogany boards a couple years back, and now I’ve got my shop back up and running, that will become a bookcase. The offcuts will go into a couple chopping boards.

The key to it is the sanding. Cutting and gluing is straightforward, but sanding it is tedious. Thus my latest acquisition - a used industrial dual drum sander for pennies on the dollar. This should make it easy enough to make them for profit. Just need to hoik it into my basement and get it set up. Possibly today :)

View attachment 445921
I need you to bring that to my new house. I have some flooring I need a tad skimming off so that I can slot it in with the existing stuff.
 
There’s a sawmill close to me that apparently produces 90% of the oak used in the whiskey industry in the US. They don’t do any cooperage themselves, but supply the wood, pre-shaped. The place is a hovel. Big pile of logs on one side, huge open-sided shed in the middle of a sea of mud, semi trailers on the other side.

I’m in the wrong business, if they have 90% of the market.
Sounds like Pontrilas Sawmills.
 

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