Tonight I cooked..........

Cottage pie, with a twist. Not too bad.

The twist being that it was made with soya mince, though a pre-cooked and more expensive one than bog standard soya mince.

After adding it, frozen, to a decent onion, carrot, mushroom and tomato sauce it really did need the extra 100ml of hot water/stock specified and at least 10 minutes simmering to get from a bouncy-castle mouth feel to just slightly rubbery. After 20 minutes in the oven it tasted quite meaty, and would no doubt please a born-again vegetarian but I can't believe that a meat eater would say anything other than 'What the bloody hell is this?'

I left it in the dish as I was going to freeze half of it - however its already in the bin.


DSCN3791.JPG
 
Cottage pie, with a twist. Not too bad.

The twist being that it was made with soya mince, though a pre-cooked and more expensive one than bog standard soya mince.

After adding it, frozen, to a decent onion, carrot, mushroom and tomato sauce it really did need the extra 100ml of hot water/stock specified and at least 10 minutes simmering to get from a bouncy-castle mouth feel to just slightly rubbery. After 20 minutes in the oven it tasted quite meaty, and would no doubt please a born-again vegetarian but I can't believe that a meat eater would say anything other than 'What the bloody hell is this?'

I left it in the dish as I was going to freeze half of it - however its already in the bin.


View attachment 404266
Obviously the taste is key, but it looks the part, right enough.
 
I too wanted something light tonight, so it was fresh bread and minestrone soup:

IMG_9208.JPG


IMG_2100.JPG


IMG_0600.JPG
 
don't bother hanging it to dry,
What would be the point anyway? Dried pasta is a cheap readily available shop bought item.

Although Im not persuaded that fresh is so much better than dried that it justifies the expense, storage space and faff of hand making it.

Happy to have it explained anew, nevertheless.
 
What would be the point anyway? Dried pasta is a cheap readily available shop bought item.

Although Im not persuaded that fresh is so much better than dried that it justifies the expense, storage space and faff of hand making it.

Happy to have it explained anew, nevertheless.
No storage. Five minutes to mix the dough, chuck in fridge in a plastic bag for a few hours, ten minutes to roll out and three minutes to cook.

You can also freeze the dough and use it later. Just defrost, dust with flour and carry on as normal.

Trick is to have the sauce ready to go when you start rolling the dough. You'll be nostils deep in good pasta within fifteen minutes. I make the tagliatelle/fettucine a bit thicker than the dried stuff you buy. Just prefer it with a more solid feel.

Also good chucked into a wok for a few seconds with oyster sauce chicken or spicy garlic chili prawns.
 
No storage. Five minutes to mix the dough, chuck in fridge in a plastic bag for a few hours, ten minutes to roll out and three minutes to cook.

You can also freeze the dough and use it later. Just defrost, dust with flour and carry on as normal.

Trick is to have the sauce ready to go when you start rolling the dough. You'll be nostils deep in good pasta within fifteen minutes. I make the tagliatelle/fettucine a bit thicker than the dried stuff you buy. Just prefer it with a more solid feel.

Also good chucked into a wok for a few seconds with oyster sauce chicken or spicy garlic chili prawns.
You have to find somewhere to store the pasta machine and ancillary attachments.

And no mention in your excellent summary of a significant flavour advantage over dried pasta.

Despite being a gadget lover, I remain unmoved :)
 
Better texture, you can flavour it if you like using spinach or beetroot and the machine packs up pretty small. I use it a lot so no need to store it somewhere obscure and out of the way. Sits on a shelf in the kitchen with the stick blender attachments.
 

Kirkz

LE
Storing gadgets is half the problem, if its stored it's a faff to get out, use and pack away. Just leave it out and use when needed, that way it's handy and no faffing.
 
Yup, shelf within arms reach, along with all the bits and bobs that go on the stick blender. In use almost daily when home on leave.
 
What would be the point anyway? Dried pasta is a cheap readily available shop bought item.

Although Im not persuaded that fresh is so much better than dried that it justifies the expense, storage space and faff of hand making it.

Happy to have it explained anew, nevertheless.
I'm in the Stonker School of Spaghetti with you regarding pasta.

I just don't like the fresh pasta you can buy in shops. Nor have any of my friends attempts at home made fresh pasta ever made me think "hah, who needs Italians".

I prefer dried pasta and at 20p/packet in Tesco/LIDL etc I don't see the point of making it. I think you can only get the al dente effect with dried pasta.
 

Latest Threads

Top