Tonight I cooked..........

No flavour. They just absorb the flavour of whatever thing they're floating about in.

Better to fry them in butter, perhaps with garlic, white pepper and a bit of cream to actually taste the delicate flavour, than just have a bunch of slightly chewy lumps floating about that taste like whatever they're in.
Mushrooms have a lovely distinct taste of their own. This is usually masked when they are bunged in a sauce.

To get the full flavour of mushroom dip them in flour, beaten egg and breadcrumbs. Deep fry. Condensed mushroominess.
 
Second para refers.

I like to fry them in a little butter with a clove of garlic. Cook them right down till they're leathery little chewy items but the flavour is intense. Bit of cream and chuck on a steak. Tres lush.
 
That is fighting talk indeed.

Certainly Italian food was spartan and basic for a lot of people throughout history, but that applies to nearly all countries.

I think Italian food (in Italy!) is probably the best cuisine in Europe and in the top five globally. It is far from a bit of mince and some pasta. Italian restaurants in Britain are generally sh1te though (although the last two decades have seen the arrival of some excellent ones).

The Frogs like to think their haute cuisine is the DBs but it is only rebadged Italian developed when Marie Antoinette stole the Italian king's chefs.

If I could teleport to anywhere in Europe for dinner this evening it would be to Italy.

Watch The Trip To Italy with Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan for a an overview of how good Italian food is (no mince).

About to give you a like, till the last sentence........ a good show ruined by a pair of pretentious luvvie twats, trying to top each other's silly voices.
 
Mushroom ketchup is easy to make. When there's a glut, finely slice a few pounds of big black gill mushies, start to layer them in a large crock with a sprinkling of sea salt between each layer. Add some cloves, splash of vinegar and cover for about a week. Strain the juice and bottle. Get the proper recipe off t'interweb. Gives anything bland a good kick up the umami.
 
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Joker62

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Chicken risotto - meat stripped from last Sunday's roast that had fed three. Half an onion, chopped, clove of garlic chopped, fry in olive oil until translucent, then chuck in 200g risotto rice, stir it about, splash of ancient Noilly Prat as no other wine available, then gradually add litre of chicken stock (made from a knorr cube) stirring to keep from sticking. Throw in the chicken pieces and a handful of frozen peas, rest of the stock until all absorbed. All told took about a half hour, while tucking into a jar of anchovy olives washed down with a stiff G&T. Enough risotto for four generous helpings.
Had it been winter the stripped carcass would've been turned into stock then soup.
 
Butchers take them out as some people are terrified of offal. My butcher would weigh and price my chops and then throw a few kidneys in.
Not in supermarkets, but in a good butcher shop you will.
Funnily enough my own butcher says that slaughterhouses usually take them out.
 
Depends on what sort of butcher I suppose. My last but one took them out and gave them to you if you asked. My last one was about 50/50 in/out. People would ask him to remove them.

I prefer them out and saute them in butter and serve on the side.
 
That is fighting talk indeed.

Certainly Italian food was spartan and basic for a lot of people throughout history, but that applies to nearly all countries.

I think Italian food (in Italy!) is probably the best cuisine in Europe and in the top five globally. It is far from a bit of mince and some pasta. Italian restaurants in Britain are generally sh1te though (although the last two decades have seen the arrival of some excellent ones).

The Frogs like to think their haute cuisine is the DBs but it is only rebadged Italian developed when Marie Antoinette stole the Italian king's chefs.

If I could teleport to anywhere in Europe for dinner this evening it would be to Italy.

Watch The Trip To Italy with Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan for a an overview of how good Italian food is (no mince).
Italian and Spanish for me.
 
That is fighting talk indeed.

Certainly Italian food was spartan and basic for a lot of people throughout history, but that applies to nearly all countries.

I think Italian food (in Italy!) is probably the best cuisine in Europe and in the top five globally. It is far from a bit of mince and some pasta. Italian restaurants in Britain are generally sh1te though (although the last two decades have seen the arrival of some excellent ones).

The Frogs like to think their haute cuisine is the DBs but it is only rebadged Italian developed when Marie Antoinette stole the Italian king's chefs.

If I could teleport to anywhere in Europe for dinner this evening it would be to Italy.

Watch The Trip To Italy with Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan for a an overview of how good Italian food is (no mince).
I have to agree. My experience is admittedly limited, but to eat well in France, go Italian.
Carluccio is my guru. He wrote a book on mushrooms, FFS.
 
I reckon some of the above is due to the reduction in number of local abattoirs and the loss of knowledge that goes with it. Goes with the loss of local cattle markets. A good butcher can get you a Barnsley chop, or lights, or brawn, but it won’t be as easy as before.
 
I reckon some of the above is due to the reduction in number of local abattoirs and the loss of knowledge that goes with it. Goes with the loss of local cattle markets. A good butcher can get you a Barnsley chop, or lights, or brawn, but it won’t be as easy as before.
Not a cooking thing but it is now impossible to get hold of a set of lungs that haven't been slashed.

I understand why in terms of preventing nasty bacterial growth but I miss being able to blow up a set of lungs like rugby balls.
 

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