Tonight I cooked..........

Not necessarily true. It is down to water hardness, which tends to be an east/west thing. East tends to be harder, and hence crap for hot drinks. So down here Cornwall and Devon have soft water, so presumably good for making drinks. Dorset, where I live, is sadly a bit harder, although the tap water is drinkable, unlike London water. There are water hardness maps online (I tried posting a link but my phone said "no").
 
I make coffee at home (13 miles W of Milton Keynes) at 0600 ish each weekday morning. I make another cup at about 0900 where I work in Coventry.

Same coffee (Aldi strength 5 Eye-talian), same quantities same drill.

Coventry brew almost always better by miles: that's prolly 'cuz the water is filtered before it's heated (one of them fancy hot boily water tap affairs)

It's costing me about 10p per cup.

Meanwhile, downstairs, the caterers are charging 2 quid for coffee that's just nasty (too bitter), partly - I'm sure - because the unfiltered water in Cov is visibly worse (kettle scale has black and brown bits in it) than the veryvery hard water I get at home (where the scale is slightly off-white).
Until a couple of years back, my water was exclusively from Ennerdale lake.
Then they added borehole water which as led to never before seen kettle scale, Fairy Liquid that fails to lather, IBS & a host of intestinal issues for all & sundry round here.

Once a week, I go up to the lake with a 25l container & bring back what I need for tea, coffee & other stuff where I'll be ingesting the water.

Odd how my tea & coffee has been restored to its previous excellence & my IBS (that wasn't there two years ago) has gone away...
 
Not necessarily true. It is down to water hardness, which tends to be an east/west thing. East tends to be harder, and hence crap for hot drinks. So down here Cornwall and Devon have soft water, so presumably good for making drinks. Dorset, where I live, is sadly a bit harder, although the tap water is drinkable, unlike London water. There are water hardness maps online (I tried posting a link but my phone said "no").
Mine said “yes”.

6878C05D-0A88-4F3A-B7AE-8630A8D8D06F.jpeg

Water Hardness Areas in the UK

There is indeed an east/west gradient. Primarily down to the geology. Igneous/plutonic Rock to the left and sedimentary to the right.


Edit: doffs cap in direction of @Kirkz
 
Very hard here in S. Glos. I have seen people filling trailerfuls of containers at the spring in the Malverns and even close to my home where the local common drains off at a roadside pipe. Dilute cattle piss is probably not good for a brew so I stuck in a softener. My Fairy liquid bill has plummeted.
 
Very hard here in S. Glos. I have seen people filling trailerfuls of containers at the spring in the Malverns and even close to my home where the local common drains off at a roadside pipe. Dilute cattle piss is probably not good for a brew so I stuck in a softener. My Fairy liquid bill has plummeted.
My old school chum is one of them.

And it's fine: I brought a big bottle home for making coffee last time I was over there :)
 
Not necessarily true. It is down to water hardness, which tends to be an east/west thing. East tends to be harder, and hence crap for hot drinks. So down here Cornwall and Devon have soft water, so presumably good for making drinks. Dorset, where I live, is sadly a bit harder, although the tap water is drinkable, unlike London water. There are water hardness maps online (I tried posting a link but my phone said "no").
I can agree with what you say. I used to live near Reading with crap hard water resulting in crap coffee. I now live in Plymouth with water fresh from Dartmoor and the same coffee beans make a great coffee.
 
Coffee.
I would never pay more that a quid for a pack of ground coffee. One and two were a B&M specials and I spend a good deal on clearing their shelves. The third is a CoOp special, which is good but not as good as the Costa stuff, and I soiled myself having to enter a CoOp communist den of perversion.
coffee.JPG
 
Coffee.
I would never pay more that a quid for a pack of ground coffee. One and two were a B&M specials and I spend a good deal on clearing their shelves. The third is a CoOp special, which is good but not as good as the Costa stuff, and I soiled myself having to enter a CoOp communist den of perversion.
View attachment 399464
You should give the Aldi French blend ( blue pack, strength 5) a go. It's not quite as good as the generic Arabica that it replaced (assuming you like your coffee strong, rich and with a very distinct chocolate finish), but it's still good value at £1.15 a pack.

FWIW, I did some systematic exmeripentation a few years ago, and my preferred method lately is to put 20g (3 scoops) of coffee into a cafetiere, and cover it to about twice it's own depth with just off the boil H2O (about a quarter of a mug) and leave it to steep for not less than 6 minutes.

That gives you a warm espresso shot, which you pour into your mug, which has sat with your (optional) sugar or aspartame and a bit of hot water making a small amount of sweet syrup while u waited.

Add a tiny drop of semi skimmed cow juice (just enough to render the espresso opaque) and top up with a fresh squirt of not-quite-boiled water (like 99.5 C, when it's noisy but not quite bubbling) from your kettle, and you're in business.

With fresh coffee, good water, a little patience and a system it's consistently good.
 
You should give the Aldi French blend ( blue pack, strength 5) a go. It's not quite as good as the generic Arabica that it replaced (assuming you like your coffee strong, rich and with a very distinct chocolate finish), but it's still good value at £1.15 a pack.

FWIW, I did some systematic exmeripentation a few years ago, and my preferred method lately is to put 20g (3 scoops) of coffee into a cafetiere, and cover it to about twice it's own depth with just off the boil H2O (about a quarter of a mug) and leave it to steep for not less than 6 minutes.

That gives you a warm espresso shot, which you pour into your mug, which has sat with your (optional) sugar or aspartame and a bit of hot water making a small amount of sweet syrup while u waited.

Add a tiny drop of semi skimmed cow juice (just enough to render the espresso opaque) and top up with a fresh squirt of not-quite-boiled water (like 99.5 C, when it's noisy but not quite bubbling) from your kettle, and you're in business.

With fresh coffee, good water, a little patience and a system it's consistently good.
The Aldi French blend was my staple when I used a cafetiere, but since I got the bean-to-cup machine I buy Arabica beans 6kg at a time online from Next Day Coffee. The big difference I find between using a cafetiere and the machine is that once you have the settings programmed into the machine every cup is consistent. The cafetiere has now been transferred to the campervan!
 
The Aldi French blend was my staple when I used a cafetiere, but since I got the bean-to-cup machine I buy Arabica beans 6kg at a time online from Next Day Coffee. The big difference I find between using a cafetiere and the machine is that once you have the settings programmed into the machine every cup is consistent. The cafetiere has now been transferred to the campervan!
Which machine do you use?
 

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