Tommy Robinson arrested

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#1
Noticed some comments on Guido earlier thst not only had Tommy Robinson been arrested but also actually imprisoned. I can't find these comments any longer so can't do a link.

However, their comments suggested this was more politically motivated and disproportionate rather than for any actual offence.
'is he imprisoned as a political dissident' and 'where's Shami?' were two of the comments that interested me.

Now I appreciate opinions are divided about him, my own opinion is that he's more sinned against than sinner (even though he may invite it) so I'm not asking whether Arrse are pro or anti the man - ISTR @Boumer making some pertinent comments somewhere.

I'm off for a quick Google as it seems to be a low priority story but I'm curious. Having seen the recent Steve Bannon/Emily Maitlis interview and Nigel Garage asking Mark Zuckerberg about who decides what content is allowed/suppressed on FB.

Is the reaction to Tommy Robinson's latest escapade completely justifiable or is it a stumbling lurch at attacking free speech?
 
#2
He was in breach of his suspended sentence. He was outside an ongoing case shouting at accused specifically against the Judges statement on handing him his suspended stretch.

He's a loudmouth buffoon who only really cares about hisself. He is also a convicted fraudster.
 
#4
Its tin foil hat time. I watched his face book livestream and as far as I could tell he did nothing wrong.
Later on it disappeared without trace and comments were being deleted in real time on his home page.

Then a news blackout / reporting restriction was announced so its illegal to even chat about it on here (Probably).

He comes across as reasonably intelligent but he is like a bear poking a beehive I think he knows exactly what he is doing and wants to start a shitstorm of a race war.

He is in the shit big time, and is highly likely to get shanked whilst inside.

The people who really run the country want him to shut up by any means, as some things are best left unsaid.
 
#5
Its tin foil hat time. I watched his face book livestream and as far as I could tell he did nothing wrong.
Later on it disappeared without trace and comments were being deleted in real time on his home page.

Then a news blackout / reporting restriction was announced so its illegal to even chat about it on here (Probably).

He comes across as reasonably intelligent but he is like a bear poking a beehive I think he knows exactly what he is doing and wants to start a shitstorm of a race war.

He is in the shit big time, and is highly likely to get shanked whilst inside.

The people who really run the country want him to shut up by any means, as some things are best left unsaid.
Bollox. He's a fantasist and a liar. He also likes to play the martyr card.

Here is the conditions of his suspended sentence and he has clearly breached them.


There will be no conditions that need to be attached to that suspended sentence, but you should be under no illusions that if you commit any further offence of any kind, and that would include, I would have thought a further contempt of court by similar actions, then that sentence of three months would be activated, and that would be on top of anything else that you were given by any other court.

In short, Mr. Yaxley-Lennon, turn up at another court, refer to people as "Muslim paedophiles, Muslim rapists" and so on and so forth while trials are ongoing and before there has been a finding by a jury
that that is what they are, and you will find yourself inside.
 
#8
It's all done for the good of diversity. Like deporting people with right wing views as soon as they arrive at the airport.
Farage has been hoofed? Get in there.
 
#9
So let me get this right; he was arrested. Taken immediately before a judge, and then sent straight to prison?
And that's democracy?
 
#10
That is one rule for him and one for the rest of society. Can you honestly say that you have not seen reporters outside of a courtroom sticking cameras in peoples faces?

I think the words that the judge found offensive or dangerous were not paedophile or rapist but, Muslim.

He was quite clever and backed himself up with facts that had been reported elsewhere and was polite and very careful to use legal jargon to not trip himself up.
I am not trying to defend him but it was quite interesting to watch and left a lot of unawnsered questions about the lack of publicity about what has gone on. But it has now been erased from the web. A bit like Mr Orwell predicted.
 
#12
So let me get this right; he was arrested. Taken immediately before a judge, and then sent straight to prison?
And that's democracy?
No, that's the judicial system. If he's broken the terms of his parole, he's bang to rights, and a judge has the right (and duty) to put him in the jug. This isn't a political matter, it's a legal one. It seems he's done this to himself.
 
#13
That is one rule for him and one for the rest of society. Can you honestly say that you have not seen reporters outside of a courtroom sticking cameras in peoples faces?

I think the words that the judge found offensive or dangerous were not paedophile or rapist but, Muslim.

He was quite clever and backed himself up with facts that had been reported elsewhere and was polite and very careful to use legal jargon to not trip himself up.
I am not trying to defend him but it was quite interesting to watch and left a lot of unawnsered questions about the lack of publicity about what has gone on. But it has now been erased from the web. A bit like Mr Orwell predicted.
These reporters you ask if we have honestly seen outside of a court room, what would they have to do with someone under a suspended sentence that included direct clauses linked to being outside of a courtroom.

This is nothing new or different and clauses for suspended sentences or people on license can and do result in return to prison if broken.
If he was simply joe bloggs the exact same thing would have happened but it wouldnt have a thread on ARRSE.
 
#14
No, that's the judicial system. If he's broken the terms of his parole, he's bang to rights, and a judge has the right (and duty) to put him in the jug. This isn't a political matter, it's a legal one. It seems he's done this to himself.
Yeah. Because it's a common occurrence in this country to arrest someone, and take them immediately before a judge isn't it?
 
#15
As @mufftickler above notes - I'm more interested in the speed of events at suppressing the content of what TR said, not interested in his personal appeal or lack of.
If what his mere presence outside court has got him banged up (potentially 13 months) or are his comments sub judice regarding the alleged grooming gang.
Supposedly there's a lot of stuff being deleted from FB and gagging orders mentioned - is this completely run of the mill?
By comparison, some of the very vocal, contentious comments made about Grenfell - naming people as 'criminals' - I suppose it may fly close to slander but then, if no-one presses charges it gets by.
So, without views concerning TR personally
Is everything surrounding his arrest legal in technicalities but rather excessive in nature.
(I'm wondering whether his custody extends little more than the duration of the trial he was doorstepping for instance).
 
#16
Leeds combined court has a precinct line in the brick work surrounding the building to allow people to come and go without undue interference. Anywhere within that line is considered inside the court itself where sound and video recording is forbidden by law. Those who disobey are in contempt of court. From what I saw Robinson was within that limit and therefore liable to be arrested and brought before the judge for that and whatever else he's supposed to have down as well.

If he was a 'proper' journalist his newsdesk would have briefed him on that.
 
#17
If I was on a suspended sentence, I'd think very hard about overstaying on a parking ticket, let alone protesting outside a crown court against followers of the gourd and sandal.
 
#18
Noticed some comments on Guido earlier thst not only had Tommy Robinson been arrested but also actually imprisoned. I can't find these comments any longer so can't do a link.

However, their comments suggested this was more politically motivated and disproportionate rather than for any actual offence.
'is he imprisoned as a political dissident' and 'where's Shami?' were two of the comments that interested me.

Now I appreciate opinions are divided about him, my own opinion is that he's more sinned against than sinner (even though he may invite it) so I'm not asking whether Arrse are pro or anti the man - ISTR @Boumer making some pertinent comments somewhere.

I'm off for a quick Google as it seems to be a low priority story but I'm curious. Having seen the recent Steve Bannon/Emily Maitlis interview and Nigel Garage asking Mark Zuckerberg about who decides what content is allowed/suppressed on FB.

Is the reaction to Tommy Robinson's latest escapade completely justifiable or is it a stumbling lurch at attacking free speech?
He's a twat who postures and endangers ongoing cases. HTH.
 
#19
As @mufftickler above notes - I'm more interested in the speed of events at suppressing the content of what TR said, not interested in his personal appeal or lack of.
If what his mere presence outside court has got him banged up (potentially 13 months) or are his comments sub judice regarding the alleged grooming gang.
Supposedly there's a lot of stuff being deleted from FB and gagging orders mentioned - is this completely run of the mill?
By comparison, some of the very vocal, contentious comments made about Grenfell - naming people as 'criminals' - I suppose it may fly close to slander but then, if no-one presses charges it gets by.
So, without views concerning TR personally
Is everything surrounding his arrest legal in technicalities but rather excessive in nature.
(I'm wondering whether his custody extends little more than the duration of the trial he was doorstepping for instance).
As I said he was vey careful about what he said . Cannot recall him mentioning anything specific relating to the defendants but was quoting previous cases and what he presented as facts about those cases.


I would not be surprised if this thread disappears as well .
 
#20
Yeah. Because it's a common occurrence in this country to arrest someone, and take them immediately before a judge isn't it?
well any one with any common sense wouldn't breach the terms of their suspended sentence - they know what will happen, the sentence will immediately be imposed, plus any sentence for the new offence
 
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