Told to consider becoming an officer?

Hello lads,

Recently passed assessment center to join as a reservist, although I'm planning to go full time in future once everything is wrapped up for me in civvie street.

In my interview stage my interviewer began asking me if I was going for an officer role. I wasn't, I was just going to go in as a reg, but he told me I had been marked on my record as an Officer candidate and he was kind of pushing me to consider it.

I don't know why. I don't have a degree. My grades in school were average. No A-Levels, did a BTEC. My fitness tests at the assessment center were pretty bog standard. My only guess is because I think I did quite well on my cognitive test (got about 70 points I think).

But I'll cut to the chase. Because of him saying that I'm considering it now, but I'm not sure if I want to do it in the reserves and think I should just wait until I try and join full time and go to Sandhurst if all goes well.

I know I'd get paid a bit more, and honestly that would help a lot, but I just don't know if I want waltz around as an "officer" when I'm a reservist and all the staff sergeants training me are proper combat veterans who've been deployed because frankly I'd feel like a bell end.
I know it'd basically be the same if I was a one pip wonder coming out of Sandhurst but I'd actually be able to say I've been to Sandhurst in that scenario.

Just hoping for some advice. Stay as a regular in the reserves then try my luck at Sandhurst in the future or go in straight as a reservist officer?
 
Definitely the latter, so I'll write the officer role off. Didn't realise that's all reserve officers do.
It isn't all that they do. They lead out in the field but their will always be administration to do as an officer. Most of it will be done by the regular PSI's and PSAO but as an officer, even a junior one you will have to put in some extra time to do some administration.
 

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Definitely the latter, so I'll write the officer role off. Didn't realise that's all reserve officers do.
Don't write anything off. Officers spend time on admin obviously, but they're "in the field" as well. They lead men into war.

I'd come back later on, when there are more folk around who can give you much better answers to your questions.

Good luck in whatever you decide.
 
I used to be a military offshore sailing instructor. The main purpose of which, and why many were recommended to try it, was to give people a taste of what being in command was like, a long way from any of the usual support structure. The loneliness of command, and all that. Most of the people were junior enlisted or NCOs who had been recommended for promotion, or as officer candidates. Most had never been on a yacht before - that didn't matter.
You might want to give adventurous training a go if you are curious about whether it's for you. Mountain climbing can work too.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
I would suggest the first thing to do is to check whether you have the qualifications for officer selection. The comments from your interviewer don’t change the rules.

There is no better or worse between soldier and officer, just different. As soldiers progress through the ranks, their work involves more and more admin/office time.
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
Hello lads,

Recently passed assessment center to join as a reservist, although I'm planning to go full time in future once everything is wrapped up for me in civvie street.

In my interview stage my interviewer began asking me if I was going for an officer role. I wasn't, I was just going to go in as a reg, but he told me I had been marked on my record as an Officer candidate and he was kind of pushing me to consider it.

I don't know why. I don't have a degree. My grades in school were average. No A-Levels, did a BTEC. My fitness tests at the assessment center were pretty bog standard. My only guess is because I think I did quite well on my cognitive test (got about 70 points I think).

But I'll cut to the chase. Because of him saying that I'm considering it now, but I'm not sure if I want to do it in the reserves and think I should just wait until I try and join full time and go to Sandhurst if all goes well.

I know I'd get paid a bit more, and honestly that would help a lot, but I just don't know if I want waltz around as an "officer" when I'm a reservist and all the staff sergeants training me are proper combat veterans who've been deployed because frankly I'd feel like a bell end.
I know it'd basically be the same if I was a one pip wonder coming out of Sandhurst but I'd actually be able to say I've been to Sandhurst in that scenario.

Just hoping for some advice. Stay as a regular in the reserves then try my luck at Sandhurst in the future or go in straight as a reservist officer?
One point, when you say "reg" or "regular" you mean "soldier". People will get confused, to the military "regular" means a full-time soldier or officer, and "reserve" means a part-time one.

I would suggest applying to the reserves as a soldier. If you want to maximise your time in the field/job, which is normal for young blokes, then that is the best route. Many reserve units are also good at recognising young soldiers with potential and pushing them towards being an officer, so it doesn't rule out that route. You can also apply to regular Sandhurst directly as an officer regardless of what you have done in the Reserves.

Not only will you get the most of what you are looking for at the moment, but if you do eventually become an officer, I'd suggest the experience as a soldier first will be invaluable and make you a much better one.
 
Hello lads,

Recently passed assessment center to join as a reservist, although I'm planning to go full time in future once everything is wrapped up for me in civvie street.

In my interview stage my interviewer began asking me if I was going for an officer role. I wasn't, I was just going to go in as a reg, but he told me I had been marked on my record as an Officer candidate and he was kind of pushing me to consider it.

I don't know why. I don't have a degree. My grades in school were average. No A-Levels, did a BTEC. My fitness tests at the assessment center were pretty bog standard. My only guess is because I think I did quite well on my cognitive test (got about 70 points I think).

But I'll cut to the chase. Because of him saying that I'm considering it now, but I'm not sure if I want to do it in the reserves and think I should just wait until I try and join full time and go to Sandhurst if all goes well.

I know I'd get paid a bit more, and honestly that would help a lot, but I just don't know if I want waltz around as an "officer" when I'm a reservist and all the staff sergeants training me are proper combat veterans who've been deployed because frankly I'd feel like a bell end.
I know it'd basically be the same if I was a one pip wonder coming out of Sandhurst but I'd actually be able to say I've been to Sandhurst in that scenario.

Just hoping for some advice. Stay as a regular in the reserves then try my luck at Sandhurst in the future or go in straight as a reservist officer?
Maybe you should think what you want in the long term?

"Walting" as an officer in the AR is certainly not walting, the reserves expect alot more from the commissioned fellows than the other ranks.

It's certainly not walting by any stretch of the imagination and the calibre is expected same as regulars, you're forgetting like the regs the reserves can discharge any tom, dick or harry for not making the cut.

It also looks good on your CV straight away that portrays management capabilities whether you've got underlying qualifications or not, my POV any way.

You'll find it's also the role of the SNCO's to advise the young "one-pip wonders" during aggressive training like during courses such as Platoon Commanders Battle Course.
 
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Bobby_Bert

Old-Salt
I know it'd basically be the same if I was a one pip wonder coming out of Sandhurst but I'd actually be able to say I've been to Sandhurst in that scenario.

Just to be clear ; If you commission via the Army Reserve you will have attended RMAS.

There are several courses at Sandhurst ; Regular Officer, Reserve Officer and Professionally Qualified Officer. You can find more out by clicking Here.
 
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Hello lads,

Recently passed assessment center to join as a reservist, although I'm planning to go full time in future once everything is wrapped up for me in civvie street.

In my interview stage my interviewer began asking me if I was going for an officer role. I wasn't, I was just going to go in as a reg, but he told me I had been marked on my record as an Officer candidate and he was kind of pushing me to consider it.

I don't know why. I don't have a degree. My grades in school were average. No A-Levels, did a BTEC. My fitness tests at the assessment center were pretty bog standard. My only guess is because I think I did quite well on my cognitive test (got about 70 points I think).

But I'll cut to the chase. Because of him saying that I'm considering it now, but I'm not sure if I want to do it in the reserves and think I should just wait until I try and join full time and go to Sandhurst if all goes well.

I know I'd get paid a bit more, and honestly that would help a lot, but I just don't know if I want waltz around as an "officer" when I'm a reservist and all the staff sergeants training me are proper combat veterans who've been deployed because frankly I'd feel like a bell end.
I know it'd basically be the same if I was a one pip wonder coming out of Sandhurst but I'd actually be able to say I've been to Sandhurst in that scenario.

Just hoping for some advice. Stay as a regular in the reserves then try my luck at Sandhurst in the future or go in straight as a reservist officer?
Ah, read a little more indepth here, Mr. @MonkeyFungus probably is trying to run before he's walking, I'm guessing you haven't even been against a selection board to see if they will have you as an officer in the first place?

It happened with one the blokes I attested with who came in guns blazing wanting to commission and he was a fitness instructor... and he got blown out, left shortly after.

A year later we had a more relaxed gent who was very much down to earth and confident although not overly arrogant... and sometime later guess what... I was bemused to see him walking past me as a "one pip wonder.
 

ITC Screw

Swinger
SME
Regular or Reserve you can rest assured you will be trained for your role.

Note that AR Infantry Platoon Commanders will do the PCBC (AR) following their commissioning course. Do not focus on what you think others will think of you. Instead study the ethos of the Regiment you aspire to commission into. Be physically fit, mature, mentally robust, a team player and be humble.
 
Ah, read a little more indepth here, Mr. @MonkeyFungus probably is trying to run before he's walking, I'm guessing you haven't even been against a selection board to see if they will have you as an officer in the first place?

It happened with one the blokes I attested with who came in guns blazing wanting to commission and he was a fitness instructor... and he got blown out, left shortly after.

A year later we had a more relaxed gent who was very much down to earth and confident although not overly arrogant... and sometime later guess what... I was bemused to see him walking past me as a "one pip wonder.
I wasn't really considering a commission any time soon, even if I was considering it in the reserves I would have left it a year or more.

I do have some knowledge of the AOSB as in sixth form the army would come in regularly and they ran us through the AOSB process quite a few times but back then I never thought I'd really have what it takes and always imagined myself as a soldier.

If I was going to go for it I'd want to be at top shape and already have some experience as a soldier. I don't expect I could go for it right now straight out of assessment.

Said in my first post if I should go straight for it but that was a mistake
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Some basics:

The OP has read up on AOSB.

All officers whether Regular, Reserve, PQO or LE commission through Sandhurst. The courses range from 4 weeks for late entry to 44 weeks for Regular.

On average about 7% of Regular OCdts are from the ranks.

It is possible to get an educational waiver if you don’t have A-levels but demonstrate potential. There are preparatory courses for that sort of applicant.

Good luck.
 

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