Tokyo Olympics 2021 - why ?

I posted the following story on the main COVID-19 thread already, but it's worth repeating it here.
Tokyo Olympics 'a go' despite pandemic, opposition, says Canadian IOC official

A number of medical organisations have come out and said that holding the games is a really bad idea.
  • The British Medical Journal said in April that the Olympic organisers should "reconsider" holding the games.
  • The US New England Journal of Medicine said that holding the Olympics was "not informed by the best scientific evidence."
  • The Tokyo Medical Practitioners' Association asked the Japanese PM to cancel the games.
  • The Japan Doctor's Union asked for the games to be cancelled as well, saying that it could spread variants.
  • Nurses and other medical groups also asked for the games to be cancelled.
The medical community has offered persistent but ineffective opposition. The 6,000-member Tokyo Medical Practitioners' Association asked Prime Minister Suga to cancel. So did the Japan Doctors Union, whose chairman warned the Olympics could spread variants of the coronavirus. Nurses and other medical groups have also pushed back.

Last week in a commentary, the New England Journal of Medicine said the IOC's decision to hold the Olympics was "not informed by the best scientific evidence." And the The British Medical Journal in an editorial in April asked organizers to "reconsider" holding the games.


On the other side of the coin, there's the money. the IOC have complete control under the "Host City Contract" and are unlikely to cancel, as they will lose billions in revenue.

The IOC get 75 per cent of their revenue from selling broadcast rights, and 18 per cent from the top 15 sponsors.

If the IOC cancel, then they will lose $3.5 billion to $4 billion in broadcast revenue. Only about $400 million to $800 million of this would be made up by insurance.

The head of the Japan Olympic Committee, who was also a member of the IOC, was forced to resign 2 years ago over a bribery scandal. There was a similar bribery scandal over the 2016 Olympics.


So on one side of the debate we have virtually every major medical or scientific organisation that I am aware of having commented on the issue saying that it should be cancelled.

On the other side of the debate we have a corrupt organisation who stand to lose billions of dollars in revenue if the Olympics don't go ahead.

Hmmm. Who to believe?
 
Surely the IOC are only following tradition? In that the games are only halted in the event of war?
Just a thought.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer


Hmmmm......

Extract
' The Japanese will go to great lengths to protect face, their own as well as others. In fact, in Japan it’s perfectly acceptable to tell a lie – even a bald-faced one – if it serves to protect face.

Japan’s culture of shame doesn’t think of lies in terms of ‘right’ and ‘wrong’, instead the goal of Japanese truth is often to protect the face of an individual, group or even the nation.

In these situations, both parties can usually read between the lines and know when the ‘truth’ is being pre-packaged to help protect face.

Unfortunately Japanese will often assume that Westerners will know as well. '
 
I feel for the organisers, the officials and the competitors at the Tokyo Olympics.

It is going to be a very costly, pointless empty experience without the presence of spectators. A total damp squib and a waste of time for everyone.

The Japanese have been sold a pup. It is a sad situation indeed.

 
It is going to be a very costly, pointless empty experience without the presence of spectators. A total damp squib and a waste of time for everyone.
I competed in a minority sport. For the most part, the only audiences were at the final, and comprised the other competitors. The world-class types weren't attention-seekers. At major events, no fvcker bought tickets (mainly because target rifle is like watching paint dry - until there's a final)

If what drives you as a competitor is the smell of the crowds and roar of the greasepaint, then I'd suggest that you aren't motivated by the right thing (and just maybe, think that the most important equipment in the gym is the mirror. Yes, you are gorgeous, you good-looking b**tard). If you're there to compete on the biggest of days, against yourself and the other best athletes in the world, you don't give a fvck about crowds.

I mean yeah, I'm sure the cheering is nice, but would you rather win a domestic match in front of a huge crowd, or win an Olympic medal with only the other competitors present?
 
[ Mods- although there are a few mentions of this issue in various Covid-related threads, this is a much wider story. Feel free to re-site as ye listeth ]

This one time , at Band Camp*, I was accused of having ' acute political antennae '

Dunno about that, but this slowly grinding disaster-in-the-making has all my Spidey senses tingling:


SOURCE
Richard Lloyd Parry, Tokyo
Sunday May 30 2021, 12.01am, The Sunday Times

With hospitals collapsing, unvaccinated Japanese rebel against Games

In the Japanese city of Kobe, where people are dying for lack of hospital beds, older doctors describe a feeling of terrible déjà vu. Here in 1995 a massive earthquake struck, toppling motorways and destroying houses. Those present at the time agree — the past few weeks have been a similar experience.

Japan’s fourth wave of the pandemic has been the worst, and Kobe, and the vast neighbouring city of Osaka, have suffered more than anywhere. The Kent and Indian variants have taken root; more patients in their thirties and forties are becoming seriously ill. The health system has suffered a collapse, with the number of patients needing hospital treatment far exceeding the supply of suitable beds.

Continues......


The International Olympic Committee, staffed by various white, male, elderly B-List past Olympians seem utterly determined to make this year's Olympics happen.

  • Despite Tokyo itself being in a state of emergency.
  • Despite only six per cent of Japanese Nationals (pop. 126M ) having received their first shot of ANY vaccine.
  • Despite a very sensible ban on non-Japanese spectators, The Times reckons 100,000 incoming visitors for the period of the Games.

There is, of course, a financial imperative at play.

Japan has sunk at least USD$15Bn in infrastructure costs.

Question: What is the financial driver behind the IOC's relentless push to make the Games happen ?
Who's Brown Envelope is at stake ?

Using the old 'Follow the Money ' tactic - who stands to LOSE the most if the Games are cancelled?

And why is no British Parliamentary group asking this?

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture Media and Sport why he has agreed that British Athletes and Para-Olympians should go ahead and attend the planned Tokyo Olympics next month - and if he will make a Statement to the House ?


I'm guessing it's just me , right ?

I mean, if Seb Coe thinks it's a good thing that should be enough for us all , right ?


View attachment 578156


#ReadySteadyTokyo

Er......


* well, First RO's comment in an ASR in the Pleistocene era

tbh no matter if it goes ahead or not i would boycott it if China take part as the instigators of Covid from their lab, letting their people travel all over the world from wuhan at the same time they were banned from travelling elsewhere within China, the buying of the worlds PPE stocks whilst not telling the world how bad the outbreak was and their lying about it to this day. On top of that I want to take away any opportunity for BLM type protests on the podium as I'm sick to death with their nonsense.
 
I think this may have something to do with it


In order to follow the money, you need to look at the sponsors and the TV rights.
The sponsors are very agressive when it comes to the Olympics. Only coke is allowed for sale at Olympic venues. IIRC all official photographers have Canon cameras etc.
The TV rights are worth millions, so the games will go ahead. I am waiting for the first event to be cancelled due to one of the competitors testing positive. Any event where equipement is shared or used by all competitors and obviously contact sports will all be suseptable to cancellation.
 


Hmmmm......

Extract
' The Japanese will go to great lengths to protect face, their own as well as others. In fact, in Japan it’s perfectly acceptable to tell a lie – even a bald-faced one – if it serves to protect face.

Japan’s culture of shame doesn’t think of lies in terms of ‘right’ and ‘wrong’, instead the goal of Japanese truth is often to protect the face of an individual, group or even the nation.

In these situations, both parties can usually read between the lines and know when the ‘truth’ is being pre-packaged to help protect face.

Unfortunately Japanese will often assume that Westerners will know as well. '

An utterly informative and enjoyable article, always a good day when you learn something wildly diverse. Cheers pal
 
Because errrrr...... It is sport and that is more important than a few people's lives?

I think the IOC may be worried about setting a precedent if the games were cancelled due to international crisis.






those 1916 Berlin games were a hoot
 
I competed in a minority sport. For the most part, the only audiences were at the final, and comprised the other competitors. The world-class types weren't attention-seekers. At major events, no fvcker bought tickets (mainly because target rifle is like watching paint dry - until there's a final)

If what drives you as a competitor is the smell of the crowds and roar of the greasepaint, then I'd suggest that you aren't motivated by the right thing (and just maybe, think that the most important equipment in the gym is the mirror. Yes, you are gorgeous, you good-looking b**tard). If you're there to compete on the biggest of days, against yourself and the other best athletes in the world, you don't give a fvck about crowds.

I mean yeah, I'm sure the cheering is nice, but would you rather win a domestic match in front of a huge crowd, or win an Olympic medal with only the other competitors present?
'mainly because target rifle is like watching paint dry - until there's a final)

And there is my point in a nutshell. Target Rifle shooting is all about keeping calm, slowing your heart rate down, slow breathing, not letting excitement or adrenaline interfere with your focus and your aim.

But with the majority of (real sports) Athletics, boxing etc are the exact opposite. And competitors taking part in those sports are assisted by the spectators feeding off their vocal support to get hyped up.

I competed at international level in the Biathlon, skiing and shooting, so combined the two.
 
And there is my point in a nutshell. Target Rifle shooting is all about keeping calm, slowing your heart rate down, slow breathing, not letting excitement or adrenaline interfere with your focus and your aim.
Beg to differ. It's about using the adrenaline to make your focus closer, your aim sharper, your reactions faster - because try as you might, you can't always keep your excitement away.

Trust me, if you finish the final and you hear the words "there is a tie", your firing point is called out, and you're up for a national (or international) medal - your heart is going to be running at well above normal, and anyone who claims otherwise is fibbing (my resting heart rate was 40 or so, but in competition it could reach 150). Malcolm Cooper's advice was to use the adrenalin, not to fear it - because those who abhorred it, eventually came unstuck when it really mattered - when their relaxation exercises and trigger words and autogenics stopped working, and the sight picture was bouncing like a rubber ball...

Spectating target rifle (less the final) is like watching paint dry. Competing demands your entire focus and complete attention.

But with the majority of (real sports)
Meow :) I did the target rifle events that are in the Olympics (not that I was good enough to get there), so by definition it's a "real sport" ;)

Anyway, you do a three-and-a-half hour three-position match; balancing a 6kg rifle with absolute stillness for 120 shots; and tell me it isn't physical. It might not be the big beach muscles, but your core gets one hell of a workout. There may also be some chubby f**kers on the point, but the top lads are rather fit; because when the wind is tricky, and you're using every available second of time, you're in agony by the end - and the unfit ones can't keep their focus and steadiness.

I competed at international level in the Biathlon, skiing and shooting, so combined the two.

Likewise (but with no skiing involved), and my point remains. If you need the crowd to push you on, perhaps your focus is in the wrong place (and it's not as if there are huge crowds at biathlon events, is it). Have you ever hit a flow state in competition? Did the outside world and any audience just fade out, until there was only you and the task at hand?

You'd be amused at Mike Babb's (twice an Olympian, prone shooter) approach to audiences. If you were sat behind him at an international as his runner [1], he really didn't like people talking; he used to say that hearing English being spoken behind him, risked cutting right through his concentration. I didn't bother; decent set of earplugs, I couldn't care what was behind me or on either side.

[1] generally, either your coach or one of your teammates sits behind you during a match; so that if you need to attract the range officer's or judges' attention (technical malfunction, say), you don't have to break position.
 
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(...) Meow :) I did the target rifle events that are in the Olympics (not that I was good enough to get there), so by definition it's a "real sport" ;)

Anyway, you do a three-and-a-half hour three-position match; balancing a 6kg rifle with absolute stillness for 120 shots; and tell me it isn't physical. It might not be the big beach muscles, but your core gets one hell of a workout. There may also be some chubby f**kers on the point, but the top lads are rather fit; because when the wind is tricky, and you're using every available second of time, you're in agony by the end - and the unfit ones can't keep their focus and steadiness.

Likewise, and my point remains. If you need the crowd to push you on, perhaps your focus is in the wrong place (and it's not as if there are huge crowds at biathlon events, is it). Have you ever hit a flow state in competition? Did the outside world just fade out until there was only you and the task at hand?
Well it seems that playing video games is now a "real sport" as well.
IOC makes landmark move into virtual sports by announcing first-ever Olympic Virtual Series

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) will partner with five International Sports Federations (IFs) and game publishers to produce the Olympic Virtual Series (OVS), the first-ever, Olympic-licensed event for physical and non-physical virtual sports.

Taking place ahead of the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020, the OVS will begin on 13 May, continuing through to 23 June 2021. The Olympic Virtual Series will mobilise virtual sport, esports and gaming enthusiasts all around the world in order to reach new Olympic audiences, while also encouraging the development of physical and non-physical forms of sports in line with the recommendations of the IOC’s Olympic Agenda 2020+5.

IOC President Thomas Bach said: “The Olympic Virtual Series is a new, unique Olympic digital experience that aims to grow direct engagement with new audiences in the field of virtual sports. Its conception is in line with Olympic Agenda 2020+5 and the IOC’s Digital Strategy. It encourages sports participation and promotes the Olympic values, with a special focus on youth.”
 

Waldeck

War Hero
The only thing I'll be watching for is the new line of Camera's and Lenses that come out.

The Yank's will be protesting, bunch of Toss Pots.
 
If BrisVegas gets the Olympics, presumably attractive sheila bum-pinching, drinking VB then projectile puking and sledging will be added to the sporting programme. Australia will then be guaranteed three gold medals.

Taking dives, laser pointing and whinging will guarantee you 3.
 
Well it seems that playing video games is now a "real sport" as well.
IOC makes landmark move into virtual sports by announcing first-ever Olympic Virtual Series

Simple - money. The Olympics continue because broadcasters fork over huge amounts of dosh for the TV rights, countries pay over the odds for the right to hold them, and corporations fork over huge amounts of cash to palce their adverts and products (e.g. "the official drink of the 2021 Olympics"). The more spectators, the more cash. Golf? Tennis? Football? Big money sports with big money sponsors. If they can get some of that lovely Virtual Sports cash, too? Result.

The big problem is the scale of the event; back in the days of few sports, and not many nations having competitors in lots of events, it was manageable. By Beijing 2008, it's 28 sports, 302 events, 11,000 athletes, and almost as many team staff (management, admin, coaches, medical, physios, etc). This is realistically the upper limit on the number of athletes in the Olympic Village - this year's Tokyo Games will see 11,000 athletes from 33 sports, the 1964 Tokyo Games only had 5,100 from 19 sports.

So if you want a popular sport in, while keeping within the numbers limit, you have to take another event out - especially if you want to add a team sport, like basketball / football. Want to add Karate as well as Taekwondo? Sure, but what gets cut? Look at cycling - twelve track events in 2000 (8 for men, 4 for women) down to ten in 2016 (five each).

I've got a lot of sympathy with the old guideline, which was "The Olympics should be the peak of every athlete's ambition". If a sport has another event with more kudos (e.g. World Cup for football; RWC for rugby; Grand Slams for tennis; the Open and Masters for Golf) then it shouldn't really be in the Olympics.
 
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2 more Prefectures have shut doors to fans, no venue access.

I know they're hoping to make their money from broadcast rights and advertising, but to be honest I find it boring to begin with, and deadly dull without any spectator generated atmosphere in the stadiums.

Even watching the rugger can be a bit of a snoozefest without the roar of the crowd when things get serious. For some reason cricket is pretty much unaffected by the feeling of ennui I get from empty stadiums. I suppose the crowds are quieter and the play is more technical, requiring tighter focus.
 
I know they're hoping to make their money from broadcast rights and advertising, but to be honest I find it boring to begin with, and deadly dull without any spectator generated atmosphere in the stadiums.

Even watching the rugger can be a bit of a snoozefest without the roar of the crowd when things get serious. For some reason cricket is pretty much unaffected by the feeling of ennui I get from empty stadiums. I suppose the crowds are quieter and the play is more technical, requiring tighter focus.

They might use artificial crowd noise to make it appear more normal/watchable.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
I know they're hoping to make their money from broadcast rights and advertising, but to be honest I find it boring to begin with, and deadly dull without any spectator generated atmosphere in the stadiums.

Even watching the rugger can be a bit of a snoozefest without the roar of the crowd when things get serious. For some reason cricket is pretty much unaffected by the feeling of ennui I get from empty stadiums. I suppose the crowds are quieter and the play is more technical, requiring tighter focus.
Oh I don’t know, the cricket World Cup a few years back was great and the fans really made it.
At OT the India v Pakistan match was brilliant, bigger rivalry you won’t find but there was not a hint of trouble and sport won the day there hands down.
The final between England and New Zealand was also a fantastic event helped again by the crowds
Perhaps you were thinking about the five day tests which can I agree get a little tedious.
 

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