Today's Battle

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Today's Battle : Relief of Mafeking 2nd Boer War 1900.


'' The news was greeted with hysterical rejoicing in Britain after the disasters of the earlier days of the war. Riotous flag-waving crowds sang, danced and cheered themselves hoarse for hours on end in London's West End and at Covent Garden Wagner's Lohengrin was halted when the news was shouted from the gallery and the Prince of Wales beat time in his box as the audience burst into song. In the provincial towns factory sirens hooted and brass bands played. B-P was the hero of the hour. His qualities of courage and resourcefulness spiced with an engaging humour and a gift for effective understatement were exactly what the moment needed. '

Also:

OP CHASTISE -Dambusters Raids on Germany , 1942.
Linky

' Led by 24-year-old Wing Commander Guy Gibson, a veteran of more than 170 bombing and night-fighter missions, twenty-one bomber crews were selected from 5 Group squadrons. The crews included RAF personnel of several nationalities, members of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) and Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF). The squadron was based at RAF Scampton, about 5 mi (8 km) north of Lincoln.

The targets selected were the Möhne Dam and the Sorpe Dam, upstream from the Ruhr industrial area, with the Eder Dam on the Eder River, which feeds into the Weser, as a secondary target. The loss of hydroelectric power was important but the loss of water to industry, cities and canals would have greater effect and there was potential for devastating flooding if the dams broke.

The aircraft were modified Avro Lancaster Mk IIIs, known as B Mark III Special (Type 464 Provisioning).[4] To reduce weight, much of the internal armour was removed, as was the mid-upper turret. The dimensions of the bomb and its unusual shape meant that the bomb-bay doors had to be removed and the bomb hung partly below the fuselage. It was mounted on two crutches and before dropping it was spun up to speed by an auxiliary motor.
[5]

Edited to add: Originally Uploaded 17 May.......Re-sent
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Today's Battle

Denmark Strait 1941 Loss of HMS Hood, sunk by Bismarck.

1,418 crew, of whom three survived.
1590336718190.png

If you are in HMNB Portsmouth, take a few minutes to visit St Anne's church. It holds the memorial Roll of the Hood. Quite sobering.

RIP


'The loss of the Hood traumatized the people of Britain and the Royal Navy; she had been the symbol of British Naval power for over 20 years and people around the world were likewise stunned at her demise. The sinking of the Hood and her crew was a tragedy which all sailors assigned to large and prestigious ships and the nations that they sail for need to keep in mind. No matter how mighty the ships all have an Achilles heel and none are unsinkable. Of the over 3600 officers and crew of the Hood and the Bismarck only 118 survived. '
 
Last edited:
Today's Battle

Denmark Strait 1941 Loss of HMS Hood, sunk by Bismarck.

1,418 crew, of whom three survived.
View attachment 476112
If you are in HMNB Portsmouth, take a few minutes to visit St Anne's church. It holds the memorial Roll of the Hood. Quite sobering.

RIP


'The loss of the Hood traumatized the people of Britain and the Royal Navy; she had been the symbol of British Naval power for over 20 years and people around the world were likewise stunned at her demise. The sinking of the Hood and her crew was a tragedy which all sailors assigned to large and prestigious ships and the nations that they sail for need to keep in mind. No matter how mighty the ships all have an Achilles heel and none are unsinkable. Of the over 3600 officers and crew of the Hood and the Bismarck only 118 survived. '
If the Emperor mong achieved anything he achieved it then. Two lovely ships.....effectively to me, a totem of a pointless war
 
May 24, 1945 – On Okinawa, during the night, Japanese mounted Operation Gi-gou

Japanese paratroopers (60 Giretsu Kuteitai commandos) on a suicide mission are landed on American held Yontan airfield and destroy a significant number of aircraft before being wiped out to just 1 survivor who escaped to Japanese lines. They destroyed 70,000 US gallons (260,000 l) of fuel. the defenders, who lost two men.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
26 May 1940 - Operation Dynamo - Dunkirk Evacuation


I grew up knowing it had been the closest of shaves....as Churchill said.

' Wars are not won by evacuations ' ( his own career in both World Wars of course was dogged with them)

“Speech on the Evacuation at Dunkirk” | Encyclopedia.com

" The last few days of the operation saw thousands of French soldiers, comprising the rearguard of the perimeter defense, evacuated as well. Newspapers had the story by then, and the operation was already being heralded as a miracle. When Operation Dynamo closed down after ten days on June 4, 337,000 Allied soldiers had been rescued from death or capture—nearly 225,000 British, almost the whole of the BEF, along with 110,000 French. The British had lost perhaps 30,000 men killed or taken prisoner, along with valuable equipment such as trucks and guns. But they had saved their army. "

The sheer chaos of the shrinking perimeter, the endurance of tired bewildered, frightened guys trying to shelter amongst sand dunes from the Luftwaffe in full flight was not truly born in on me till I read this:



1590514625491.png


It also illustrates clearly the losses the RN sustained, much as they would later during the evacuation of Crete.
 
May 26th

1941
– A British Catalina PBY-5 aircraft, piloted by a US Navy officer (Ensign Leonard B. “Tuck” Smith USN was awarded a DFC but could not tell others why for several years) finds Bismarck only 700 miles from Brest and it is clear that the aircraft of the Ark Royal (of Force H) offer the best chance of slowing the German ship so that she can be caught.

1944 – USS England (DE-635 Buckley Class) sinks fifth Japanese submarine (RO-108) in one week.

1945 – Some 464 American B-29 Superfortress bombers fire-bombed Tokyo with about 4000 tons of incendiaries.
 

Yokel

LE
Today's Battle

Denmark Strait 1941 Loss of HMS Hood, sunk by Bismarck.

1,418 crew, of whom three survived.
View attachment 476112
If you are in HMNB Portsmouth, take a few minutes to visit St Anne's church. It holds the memorial Roll of the Hood. Quite sobering.

RIP


'The loss of the Hood traumatized the people of Britain and the Royal Navy; she had been the symbol of British Naval power for over 20 years and people around the world were likewise stunned at her demise. The sinking of the Hood and her crew was a tragedy which all sailors assigned to large and prestigious ships and the nations that they sail for need to keep in mind. No matter how mighty the ships all have an Achilles heel and none are unsinkable. Of the over 3600 officers and crew of the Hood and the Bismarck only 118 survived. '
My grandfather served aboard Hood until shortly before her loss.

If the Emperor mong achieved anything he achieved it then. Two lovely ships.....effectively to me, a totem of a pointless war
Pointless? It stopped Nazism.

26 May 1940 - Operation Dynamo - Dunkirk Evacuation


I grew up knowing it had been the closest of shaves....as Churchill said.

' Wars are not won by evacuations ' ( his own career in both World Wars of course was dogged with them)

“Speech on the Evacuation at Dunkirk” | Encyclopedia.com

" The last few days of the operation saw thousands of French soldiers, comprising the rearguard of the perimeter defense, evacuated as well. Newspapers had the story by then, and the operation was already being heralded as a miracle. When Operation Dynamo closed down after ten days on June 4, 337,000 Allied soldiers had been rescued from death or capture—nearly 225,000 British, almost the whole of the BEF, along with 110,000 French. The British had lost perhaps 30,000 men killed or taken prisoner, along with valuable equipment such as trucks and guns. But they had saved their army. "

The sheer chaos of the shrinking perimeter, the endurance of tired bewildered, frightened guys trying to shelter amongst sand dunes from the Luftwaffe in full flight was not truly born in on me till I read this:



View attachment 476792

It also illustrates clearly the losses the RN sustained, much as they would later during the evacuation of Crete.
Losses the Royal Navy could ill afford, particularly as the fall of France would give the U boats easy access to the Atlantic. Likewise the RAF suffered significant losses protecting the evacuation breaches.

The architect of the evacuation, Vice Admiral Sir Bertram Ramsay, was the chief planner for the Normandy landings four years later.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
I posted some of the stats on the evacuation in another thread a while back.

I'm sure there are more than a few people in UK who think 300,000 guys were brought back to Blighty exclusively by Ramsgate trawlers and Thames pleasure boats.
 
I posted some of the stats on the evacuation in another thread a while back.

I'm sure there are more than a few people in UK who think 300,000 guys were brought back to Blighty exclusively by Ramsgate trawlers and Thames pleasure boats.
And many more probably think that Dunkirk was the finale of BEF involvement in France 1940. Commencing on this day:

'The Battle of Abbeville took place from 27 May to 4 June 1940, near Abbeville during the Battle of France in the Second World War. On 20 May, the 2nd Panzer Division advanced 56 miles (90 km) to Abbeville on the English Channel, overran the 25th Infantry Brigade of the 50th (Northumbrian) Infantry Division and captured the town at 8:30 p.m. Only a few British survivors managed to retreat to the south bank of the Somme and at 2:00 a.m. on 21 May, the III Battalion, Rifle Regiment 2 reached the coast, west of Noyelles-sur-Mer.

'The 1st Armoured Division (Major-General Roger Evans) arrived in France from 15 May without artillery, short of an armoured regiment and the infantry of the 1st Support Group, which had been diverted to Calais. From 27 May to 4 June, attacks by the Franco-British force south of the Abbeville bridgehead, held by the 2nd Panzer Division 4e Division Cuirassée, then the 57th Infantry Division, recaptured about half of the area; the Allied forces lost many of their tanks and the Germans much of their infantry, some units running back over the River Somme. On 5 June, the divisions of the German 4th Army attacked out of the bridgeheads south of the Somme and pushed back the Franco-British divisions opposite, which had been much depleted by their counter-attacks, to the Bresle with many casualties.'


 
Last edited:
Saturday 28th March - The Raid on St Nazaire 1942



View attachment 460545

To some unfamiliar with the intent behind Operation CHARIOT - this shot may look as though the Andrew carelessly parked one of their destroyers ashore.

The aim of the raid ,from the Navy's point of view, was to deny the Nazi war machine the use of one of the only drydocks on the French Atlantic coast that could accommodate the German Navy's largest threats - the battleships Bismarck and Tirpitz.

HMS Campbeltown, pictured, was one of the vintage US destroyers which had arrived as part of the 'Lend Lease 'deal. She had been laid down in 1919 and served for 20 years as the USS Buchanan.

With 260 RM commandos onboard, plus a large explosive charge in the bow, she rammed the dry dock gates at 01:30 in the morning at 19 knots.

Fitted with time fuzes, the charge exploded next day at noon, taking with it 320 casualties from the occupying forces. These included a party of German staff officers who were aboard inspecting the damage to the dock gates at the time.

An accompanying force of MTBs and MGBs was detected by the port garrison and shot to ribbons. With their seaborne escape route cut off , the Commandos fought their way into town until they were forced to surrender.

Only 5 men escaped through Southern France into Spain , the rest being taken prisoner.

The scale of the Kriegsmarine U-Boat pens in St Nazaire, which were NOT the aim point of the raid, can be seen in the French video of St Nazaire today.


As a major U-Boat base, the port was extensively bombed by both the RAF and the USAAF subsequently. It didn't stop the U-boat ops.


Saint-Nazaire - Wikipedia

The U-boat threat to supply convoys across the Atlantic made Saint-Nazaire a constant target of Allied air forces, in the face of determined Luftwaffe fighter opposition to raids by United States Army Air Forces Eighth Air Force bombers. On 3 January 1943 Colonel Curtis LeMay led 85 Boeing B-17 Flying Fortresses of the 1st Bombardment Wing against the U-boat pens at Saint-Nazaire, on the Eighth Air Force's sixth raid against the facility. LeMay also introduced the combat box defensive formation, echeloning three-plane elements within a squadron, and squadrons within a group, to concentrate defensive firepower against fighter opposition. Only 76 aircraft found and hit the target and during the mission seven bombers were shot down and 47 damaged.

As a result of the raid, on 14 January 1943 under directive (S.46239/?? A.C.A.S. Ops), the Allies implemented incendiary bomb tactics against U-boat pens, under the Area bombing directive. To minimize civilian casualties during air attacks, the Allies devised a plan to force an evacuation of the town. For three days in 1943, British Royal Air Force and American aircraft dropped scores of leaflets warning the population of a planned fire-bombing raid. At the end of the third day, the raid came and burned the entire city to the ground. Casualties were light as most of the civilians had heeded the warning and fled to the safety of the countryside but after that point, except for the self-contained U-boat base, Saint-Nazaire remained abandoned until the end of the war.

After D-day and the liberation of most of France in 1944, German troops in Saint-Nazaire's submarine base refused to surrender, and they holed up (as did their counterparts in the La Rochelle and Lorient bases). Since the Germans could no longer conduct major submarine operations from the bases without a supply line, the SHAEF commander, U.S. General Dwight D. Eisenhower decided to simply bypass these ports, and the Allied armies focused their resources on the invasion of Germany. Saint-Nazaire and the other two German "pockets" remained under German control until after the last day of the war in Europe, 8 May 1945.
U-Boat pens at La Pallice, La Rochelle new port:
004_01.jpg

006_03.jpg
007_04.jpg

008_05.jpg

009_06.jpg

002_00.jpg

There was one bypassed 'pocket' that was taken before the end of the war, that of Royan, the town that commanded the entrance to the Gironde river (and hence the port of Bordeaux). The FFI were given the job of capturing the town but by December 1944 had made little progress. As a result (allegedly) of a drunken conversation between a senior French Officer and an American one (HQ was in Cognac, say no more), it was agreed that the Royan Pocket should be bombed by the RAF. Unfortunately, when the request went through, the 'pocket' bit was left off, resulting in a massive strike by Bomber Command on the night of 5th January 1945, which destroyed the town and nearly a thousand of it's inhabitants, but only 40 odd Germans. It was then agreed that an informal truce should be put in place between the French and the Germans until the war ended. However, a certain French General with a big nose got in on the act and decided that taking the Royan Pocket wolud be just the job to restore the pride and kudos of the French Army. An attack went in on the 15th April, preceded by a massive attack on the Coubre forest by the USAAF, using napalm in the European Theatre for the first time. After 3 days of hard fighting, the Germans (mainly fortress troops and Kriegsmarine) surrendered - both sides suffered heavy losses just before the German capitulation. Incidentally, most of the fighting troops on the French side were North Africans, but you will not see that on French memorials.
vue_Royan_2.jpg

Royan after the bombing, the Municipal Casino is shown ruined in the centre.
 
Last edited:

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Every day a college day....we had our honeymoon in Royan in 1984.....I was unaware until reading your post of the extent of the effort to dislodge the Boche.
 
Every day a college day....we had our honeymoon in Royan in 1984.....I was unaware until reading your post of the extent of the effort to dislodge the Boche.
My wife is French and we have a house in St Augustin a few miles inland from Royan and I got very interested in the local history. I am preparing a presentation on the Royan Tramway which ran from St George-de-Didonne to the east of Royan through to Ronce les Bains opposite Ile d'Oleron. It proved extremely useful to the Todt Organisation when they were building the Atlantic Wall! The town of Royan was being built up to be the Las Vegas of France, with about 6 casinos dotted along the coast. The Municipal Casino was held to be the most beautiful building in France at one time and was used as the aiming point in the RAF raid.
Hospital 8.jpg

Casino de Foncillon, just around the bay:
royan1.jpg
 
27 May 1918, the Battle of the Aisne. Five British divisions, sent to that sector to 'rest' after being caught up in the first two Kraut spring offensives (Michael and Georgette) were royally shafted by the GOC Frog 6th Army (Denis Duchene) as well as the Krauts. Read Sidney Rogerson's 'The Last of the Ebb'.
 
May 27th-

1943
On Attu American forces make some progress along the Clevesy Pass. Japanese are driven off of Fish Hook Ridge in heavy fighting. Also, Americans begin work on an airfield at Alexai Point.

1944On Biak Island, the US 41st Infantry Division (General Fuller) lands near Bosnek. Naval escort for the landing is provided by cruisers and destroyers under the command of Admiral Fechteler. The forces of Admiral Crutchley and Admiral Berkey provide support. The Japanese garrison, led by Colonel Kuzume, numbers about 11,000 men but it does not resist the landings

1945On Okinawa, American forces attacking southward, continue to encounter heavy Japanese resistance. Japanese aircraft begin a two-day series of strikes against the Allied naval forces around the island. The US destroyer Drexler is sunk.

1945On Luzon, The US 25th Division, part of the US 1st Corps, takes Santa Fe . There is still heavy fighting in several parts of Mindanao.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
05 June 1900 - British capture Pretoria , 2nd Boer War

1591397090331.png


05 June 1944 Allied Forces entered Rome.


05 June 1944 - Operation Deadstick - Glider borne landing , Pegasus Bridge, Caen . First Allied Troops to land in France as part of Operation Overlord.

SOURCE

'
1591397759032.png

At 22:56 on 5 June, 1944, six 'Horsa ' gliders towed by Halifax bombers took off from RAF Tarrant Rushton.

Horsa number one, the first of the three headed for the Caen Canal, carried Howard with Lieutenant Den Brotheridge's platoon, number two bore Lieutenant David Wood's platoon, and number three carried Lieutenant Smith's platoon.

Priday with Lieutenant Hooper's platoon made for the river bridge aboard number four. Horsa number five carrying Lieutenant Fox's platoon was followed by number six bearing Tod Sweeney's platoon.

Each glider also carried five Royal Engineers.[34]

Flying over the English Channel at 7,000 feet (2,100 m), the bombers crossed the Normandy coast at 00:07 on 6 June, 1944 and released their towed gliders.[33]

With Wallwork at the controls, the number one glider crashed into the barbed wire surrounding the canal bridge defences at 00:16.[35] The other two gliders followed at one-minute intervals. The number two glider broke in half and came to halt at the edge of a large pond.[33] One of the men, Lance-Corporal Fred Greenhalgh, was knocked unconscious following the crash landing and thrown out of his glider and died by drowning, becoming the first casualty of the operation.[36]

Brotheridge and Smith's platoons headed for the bridge, while Wood's platoon moved towards the trenches on its north east side.[37]
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Yesterday 25th June 1950 - North Korea invades the South, sparking the Korean War.


SOURCE


On June 26 (June 25 in New York City) the UN Security Council approved a resolution condemning the invasion of South Korea. The Soviet Union was unable to impose a veto, because its delegate had been boycotting the meetings to protest the fact that the People’s Republic of China had no representation in the United Nations.

On June 27 U.S. Pres. Harry S. Truman issued the order for U.S. air and naval forces to resist communist aggression in Korea; that afternoon the UN Security Council ratified Truman’s decision to send air and sea aid to Korea, calling upon UN members to render such assistance to Korea as might be necessary to restore peace.

But Seoul fell on June 28, and most of the South Korean army was destroyed.

On June 30 Truman ordered U.S. ground forces in Japan into Korea; the first U.S. troops reached the battlefield on July 4.

The UN approved the creation of a unified command in Korea, and Gen. Douglas MacArthur was appointed commander.

Sixteen member nations sent armed contingents, but the United States furnished the great bulk of the air units, naval forces, supplies, and financing.




1593177103587.png


100,000 British service personnel were involved in the Korean War with over 1,000 killed.
SOURCE 2

1593177402524.png

Roll call of Gloucestershire Regiment survivors after the Battle of the Imjin River, 1951

1593177636753.png

A tank crew from the 8th (King's Royal Irish) Hussars make a meal during their service on the Imjin, 1951
 
Last edited:
4th July 1806.

Battle of Maida. One of our earliest land victories in the Napoleonic Wars. Ironically considering the date the British commander, Sir John Stuart, was born in America.

 
4th July 1643, battle of Burton Bridge.


Royalists drive a convoy of forty wagons of arms and gunpowder through the Parliamentarian forces, on the way from Bridlington to Oxford. Having pawned the Crown Jewels, the Queen brought enough to keep the King fighting another year.
 
July 6th
1864
Confederate General Jubal Early’s troops cross the Potomac River and capture Hagerstown, Maryland. Early had sought to threaten Washington, D.C., and thereby relieve pressure on General Robert E. Lee, who was fighting to keep Ulysses S. Grant out of Richmond.

1943 – Night Battle of Kula Gulf results in loss of 2 Japanese destroyers and USS Helena.
1943 – An American force (4 cruisers and 4 destroyers) led by Admiral Giffen bombards Japanese positions on Kiska Island.

1945 – Some 600 US B-29 Superfortress bombers struck Osaka, Kofu, Chiba, Shimizu (near Tokyo), Shimotsu and Akashi, all on Honshu. Nearly 4000 tons of bombs are dropped.

1950 – The 24th Infantry Division’s 34th Infantry Regiment was driven from Pyongtaek by an overwhelming North Korean onslaught in the first of a series of delaying actions down the peninsula.
1950 – U.S. Air Force B-29s from the 19th Bomb Group hit the Wonsan oil refinery following a move from Guam to a new base in Okinawa in record time.

1964At Nam Dong in the northern highlands of South Vietnam, an estimated 500-man Viet Cong battalion attacks an American Special Forces outpost. During a bitter battle, Capt. Roger C. Donlon, commander of the Special Forces A-Team, rallied his troops, treated the wounded, and directed defenses although he himself was wounded several times. After five hours of fighting, the Viet Cong withdrew. The battle resulted in an estimated 40 Viet Cong killed; two Americans, 1 Australian military adviser, and 57 South Vietnamese defenders also lost their lives. At a White House ceremony in December 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson presented Captain Donlon with the first Medal of Honor of the Vietnam War.

Warrant Officer Kevin Conway of the Australian Army Training Team Vietnam (AATTV) was killed in the assault. He was the first Australian to be killed in action in the Vietnam War.

Medal of Honor citiation for Donlon

DONLON, ROGER HUGH C.
Rank and organization: Captain, U.S. Army.
Place and date: Near Nam Dong, Republic of Vietnam, 6 July 1964.
Entered service at: Fort Chaffee, Ark.
Born: 30 January 1934, Saugerties, N.Y. G.O. No.: 41, 17 December 1964.

Citation:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while defending a U.S. military installation against a fierce attack by hostile forces. Capt. Donlon was serving as the commanding officer of the U.S. Army Special Forces Detachment A-726 at Camp Nam Dong when a reinforced Viet Cong battalion suddenly launched a full-scale, predawn attack on the camp. During the violent battle that ensued, lasting 5 hours and resulting in heavy casualties on both sides, Capt. Donlon directed the defense operations in the midst of an enemy barrage of mortar shells, falling grenades, and extremely heavy gunfire.

Upon the initial onslaught, he swiftly marshaled his forces and ordered the removal of the needed ammunition from a blazing building. He then dashed through a hail of small arms and exploding hand grenades to abort a breach of the main gate. En route to this position he detected an enemy demolition team of 3 in the proximity of the main gate and quickly annihilated them. Although exposed to the intense grenade attack, he then succeeded in reaching a 60mm mortar position despite sustaining a severe stomach wound as he was within 5 yards of the gun pit. When he discovered that most of the men in this gunpit were also wounded, he completely disregarded his own injury, directed their withdrawal to a location 30 meters away, and again risked his life by remaining behind and covering the movement with the utmost effectiveness.

Noticing that his team sergeant was unable to evacuate the gun pit he crawled toward him and, while dragging the fallen soldier out of the gunpit, an enemy mortar exploded and inflicted a wound in Capt. Donlon’s left shoulder. Although suffering from multiple wounds, he carried the abandoned 60mm mortar weapon to a new location 30 meters away where he found 3 wounded defenders. After administering first aid and encouragement to these men, he left the weapon with them, headed toward another position, and retrieved a 57mm recoilless rifle.

Then with great courage and coolness under fire, he returned to the abandoned gun pit, evacuated ammunition for the 2 weapons, and while crawling and dragging the urgently needed ammunition, received a third wound on his leg by an enemy hand grenade. Despite his critical physical condition, he again crawled 175 meters to an 81mm mortar position and directed firing operations which protected the seriously threatened east sector of the camp. He then moved to an eastern 60mm mortar position and upon determining that the vicious enemy assault had weakened, crawled back to the gun pit with the 60mm mortar, set it up for defensive operations, and turned it over to 2 defenders with minor wounds.

Without hesitation, he left this sheltered position, and moved from position to position around the beleaguered perimeter while hurling hand grenades at the enemy and inspiring his men to superhuman effort. As he bravely continued to move around the perimeter, a mortar shell exploded, wounding him in the face and body. As the long awaited daylight brought defeat to the enemy forces and their retreat back to the jungle leaving behind 54 of their dead, many weapons, and grenades, Capt. Donlon immediately reorganized his defenses and administered first aid to the wounded.

His dynamic leadership, fortitude, and valiant efforts inspired not only the American personnel but the friendly Vietnamese defenders as well and resulted in the successful defense of the camp. Capt. Donlon’s extraordinary heroism, at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty are in the highest traditions of the U.S. Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of his country.

Donlon retired as a full Colonel and was my Brigade commander in 1985 he personally led bayonet training and insisted even the supply clerks take it
 

Bodenplatte

Old-Salt
There was one bypassed 'pocket' that was taken before the end of the war, that of Royan, the town that commanded the entrance . . . . However, a certain French General with a big nose got in on the act and decided that taking the Royan Pocket wolud be just the job to restore the pride and kudos of the French Army. An attack went in on the 15th April, preceded by a massive attack on the Coubre forest by the USAAF, using napalm in the European Theatre for the first time.
The napalm attack on Royan in April 45 was not the first use in ETOUSA. It was the first use by 8th Air Force.
The first use in Europe was on the fortress island of Cézembre, off St Malo, in August 1944. This was carried out by P-38s of the 9th Air Force.
A famous photograph of the St Malo attack was taken by the American female war correspondent, Lee Miller, and was rapidly censored.

 
Last edited:
Top