To our American friends: Watch it!

#1
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dy...10/09/AR2008100902953.html?hpid=moreheadlines

The chairman of the Senate intelligence committee is looking into allegations that a U.S. spy agency improperly eavesdropped on the phone calls of hundreds of Americans overseas, including aid workers and U.S. military personnel talking to their spouses at home.

The allegations, by two former military intercept officers assigned to the National Security Agency, include claims that U.S. spies routinely listened in on intimate conversations...
 

cpunk

LE
Moderator
#3
Shocking! Fortunately the democratic government of the Russian Federation would never do such a thing so there is a beacon of hope in the world.

Murder overseas dissidents with Polonium, maybe; but spy on them? NEVER!
 
#4
Why is anyone surprised. Monkey boy has been trying out his own brand of McCartyism for some time. Stalin would have been proud of the Patriot act
 
#5
Ahem, so it wasn't me sitting in a number of exchanges in NI or the Falklands during the mid 90s, listening directly to internal and external calls? Most interesting it was too!

These things can be done through the proper channels you know! Or is there some money in the story! :lol:

This activity is strictly controlled in the UK through the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000, so nobody panic or worry; it's perfectly acceptable to monitor your calls! :wink: :wink: :wink:
 
#6
KGB_resident said:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/10/09/AR2008100902953.html?hpid=moreheadlines

The chairman of the Senate intelligence committee is looking into allegations that a U.S. spy agency improperly eavesdropped on the phone calls of hundreds of Americans overseas, including aid workers and U.S. military personnel talking to their spouses at home.

The allegations, by two former military intercept officers assigned to the National Security Agency, include claims that U.S. spies routinely listened in on intimate conversations...
Ho Hum. This is not news. :? The article goes on to say:

While declining to give specifics, an NSA spokesman said some of the allegations were currently under investigation, while others had been "found to be unsubstantiated."

"We operate in strict accordance with U.S. laws and regulations and with the highest standards of integrity and lawful action," said chief spokesman Patrick Bumgardner. He added that any evidence of misconduct would bring a "swift and certain" response.
What would be news would be the Brits getting to the bottom of the case of the poisoned Russian expat. :wink:
 
#7
Sergey,

Surely with the world in such a downspin you can do anti-Americanism better than this? This must be the new guy. Ramping him up slowly eh?
 
#8
Ruckerwocman said:
What would be news would be the Brits getting to the bottom of the case of the poisoned Russian expat. :wink:
Ah! But what if it wasn't Moscow behind the murder, but Mr Berezovsky? That might explain British reluctancy to get "to the bottom of the case".
 
#9
KGB_resident said:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/10/09/AR2008100902953.html?hpid=moreheadlines

The chairman of the Senate intelligence committee is looking into allegations that a U.S. spy agency improperly eavesdropped on the phone calls of hundreds of Americans overseas, including aid workers and U.S. military personnel talking to their spouses at home.

The allegations, by two former military intercept officers assigned to the National Security Agency, include claims that U.S. spies routinely listened in on intimate conversations...
If you transmit information someone in the World will try to listen. Probably many. So what? Do we not all know this?
 
#10
Oh Dommy, the great thing about you Sovs, sorry, Russians is your ability for denial, look mate, your KGB boys did it, live with the fact you're a bunch of embittered has-beens with paranoid delusions who like to kill dissidents – it saves time
 
#11
Hopefully they got off listening to me talk dirty to my old lady!
 
#13
Maple said:
... look mate, your KGB boys did it, live with the fact you're a bunch of embittered has-beens with paranoid delusions who like to kill dissidents – it saves time
:rofl:

Case is closed, Maple solved it on emotional level!
 
#15
chalice said:
U.S.Paratrooper said:
Hopefully they got off listening to me talk dirty to my old lady!
So the whole Spam backwoods incest thing is true then?
We learned it from our ancestors across the Atlantic.
 
#17
#18
ghost_us said:
Sergey,

Surely with the world in such a downspin you can do anti-Americanism better than this? This must be the new guy. Ramping him up slowly eh?
Where do you see 'anti-Americanism' Ghost? Try to explain it, please. I quoted much respected and rather conservative American newspaper. Unlikely the Washington Post could be regarded as 'anti-American'.

I haven't made any comments. The title is as friendly to the Americans as possible. And you accuse me in 'anti-Americanism'. Well, the news are worth to be discussed (also there is practical aspect). So,please, propose me a form to initiate a discussion that would not look 'anti-American' in your eyes.

Frankly speaking, I expected even one post that looks like...

Thank you for warning. However, we are well aware about this practice and are carefull enough not to say something unwanted.
 
#19
Don't worry, it must be OK since even Sweden does it !! :D

We Finns would not even consider such naughty tactics, would we ? :twisted:

http://www.hs.fi/english/article/CO...+sets+Sweden+apart+from+Finland/1135225793543

COMMENTARY: Eavesdropping bill sets Sweden apart from Finland

By Jukka Harju

Sweden's Minister of Defence Mikael Odenberg was compelled to explain to Finnish journalists on Thursday evening why Sweden wants to give its military intelligence service extensive authority to monitor telephone and e-mail traffic that crosses its border. The surveillance would also target Finns.
In the same connection Odenberg observed that Finland has practiced the same kind of communications surveillance for a much longer time.
He is correct. All sovereign states in the world do it.
And he is wrong. The uproar that resulted in Sweden over the eavesdropping, and the reactions in Finland reveal how differently Finland and Sweden have arranged this top-secret and mysterious official business that is familiar from spy novels. They also show how easily misunderstandings can arise.

Finland does not have an institution that would be equivalent to Försvarets radioanstalt (FRA), the communications surveillance organisation of the Swedish Defence Forces, which responds to requests from the country's armed forces, customs, or police.
The closest equivalent in Finland to the FRA in the Finnish Defence Forces is Viestikoelaitos, which is rarely mentioned in public.
It is easy to surmise that its antennas and radar are pointed especially to the east, from where it picks out radio transmissions.
The transmissions can reveal, for instance, movements of military units in that country, command hierarchies, and flight routes of military aircraft. It is part of preparation for military crises, which is part of the role of the Defence Forces, rather than fighting crime.
It is known as signal surveillance. It is not determined by any Finnish law, and no annual reports are made on it to the Parliamentary Ombudsman, as police are required to do for their own eavesdropping.
At the same time, on the other side of the border, antennas and radars are pointed in our direction. They catch the same data. It is in this way that states monitor each other across borders.
However, the thought that Viestikoelaitos would be given the same authority as Sweden's FRA is utopian, to say the least.

However, now Swedish military surveillance is being granted the right to monitor all cross-border electronic interaction between people. The most noteworthy part is that the activity will not require permission from any court.
It is a big change, and requires a considerable range of linguistic skills from those doing the listening.
What is noteworthy in the preparations for the proposed legislation is that even Swedish police are opposed to increasing the authority of FRA, because they feel that such a move would involve an encroachment on their territory. Traditionally, fighting crime and criminal surveillance are tasks for the police, which are under the authority of the Ministry of the Interior.
According to Finnish law, only police and customs authorities are entitled to listen in on conversations, when they are investigating an especially serious crime, and they need a court's permission for the surveillance.
A military organisation - the Technical Research Centre of the Finnish Defence Staff, cannot do so, as its authority is much more restricted.
Whereas the National Bureau of investigation can even use undercover officers to infiltrate criminal organisations, the military is restricted mainly to pointing a parabolic microphone at a person suspected of espionage, and to try to find out what the person is saying. It has even done so.
This one and only time caused the Parliamentary Ombudsman to make note that legislation on police tasks in the Defence Forces is not quite in order today.
The reason for this is that while the police have received plenty of new powers in recent years, their impact on the law on carrying out police tasks in the Defence Forces has not been examined. It was seen even in the Defence Forces that this law requires updating, so that nobody's fundamental rights are put in jeopardy.
 

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