To all the kids who survived the 1930s -1970s

Discussion in 'The NAAFI Bar' started by Ex-Grenadier, Apr 21, 2007.

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  1. First, we survived being born to mothers who smoked and/or drank while they carried us.

    They took aspirin, ate blue cheese dressing, tuna from a can, and didn’t get tested for diabetes.

    Then after that trauma, our baby cribs were covered with bright coloured lead-based paints.

    We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets and when we rode our bikes, we had no helmets, not to mention, the risks we took hitchhiking.

    As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags.

    We drank water from a garden hose and NOT from a bottle.

    We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle and NO ONE actually died from this.

    We ate cakes, white bread and real butter and drank pop with sugar in it, but we weren’t overweight because…………………

    WE WERE ALWAYS OUT PLAYING!!

    We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back when the streetlights came on.

    No one was able to reach us all day. And we were O.K.

    We would spend hours building our go-carts out of scraps and then ride down the hill, only to find out we forgot the brakes. After running into the bushes a few times, we learned to solve the problem.

    We did not have Playstations, Nintendo’s, X-boxes, no video games at all, no 99 channels on cable, no videotape movies, no surround sound, no cell phones, no personal computers, no Internet or Internet chat rooms……….. WE HAD FRIENDS and we went outside and found them!

    We fell out of trees, got cut, broke bones and teeth and there were no lawsuits from these accidents.

    We ate worms and mud pies made from dirt, and the worms did not live in us forever and we made up games with sticks and tennis balls and although we were told it would happen, we did not put out very many eyes.
    We rode bikes or walked to a friend’s house and knocked on the door or rang the bell, or just yelled for them!

    Football teams had trials and not everyone made the team. Those who didn’t had to learn to deal with disappointment. Imagine that!!

    The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke the law was unheard of; they actually sided with the law!

    Those born during these years have produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers and inventors ever.

    The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas.

    We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned

    HOW TO DEAL WITH IT ALL

    And YOU are one of them! CONGRATULATIONS!

    You might want to share this with others who have been fortunate enough to grow up as kids, before the EU, the lawyers and the government regulated our lives for our own good. :D
     
  2. Excellent Post!
     
  3. oldie but a goldie
     
  4. "Bliss was it that Dawn to be alive!
    And to be Young was very Heaven"


    And I was lucky enough to be one of 'em! :lol: :D

    Yippeeeee! :lol: :D 8) :roll: :wink: :) :) :D
     
  5. spike7451

    spike7451 RIP

    ow true....AND the local copper could give you a clout around the ear & then see your father later on.AND then you got the hiding of your lie from dad.
    Plus you called the copper Sir...
     
  6. Too right you did!

    I was brought up to (metaphorically) salute anyone who was older/bigger than me - and then made a career of doing it.

    In my youth we went in awe of RUC men and Gardai.
     
  7. not like it was in my day..etc,etc

    as said, an oldie but a goodie!
     
  8. Any adult could give you a clip round the ear and tell your dad about what you'd done to deserve it in the certainty that he'd back them up. And he'd belt you for doing it and again for disgracing the family in front of others.

    But then we (mostly) all had dads in them days and they knew all the other adults in the neighbourhood...
     
  9. Was this taken out of the Best of British magazine?

    Where all the ills of the world are a direct result of the UK's conversion to decimal currency.

    Still, polio and rickets were fun.
     
  10. . . . an' the Dublin gurriers goin' to school with their heads painted with Gentian Violet.

    An' the shawlies begging on O'Connell Bridge.

    And the Dublin Workhouse, that didn't close until about 1970.

    Spacious days . . .
     
  11. First, we survived being born to mothers who had tuberculosis while they carried us.

    They took leeches, ate mutton pie and didn’t get tested for diabetes.

    Then after that trauma, our baby cribs were non existent.

    We had no childproof lids on potion bottles, doors or cabinets and when we went fencing, we had no helmets, not to mention, the risks we took jousting.

    As children, we would ride on horses with no seat belts or air bags.

    We drank water from the well and NOT from a bottle.

    We shared one roast pig with four friends, from one fire and NO ONE actually died from this.

    We ate gruel, bread and rancid butter and drank water with dead rats in it, but we weren’t overweight because…………………

    WE WERE ALWAYS OUT WORKING!!

    We would leave home in the morning and work all day, as long as we were back before the Pied Piper came out.

    No one was able to reach us all day. And we were O.K.

    We would spend hours picking our scabs, only to find out we had the plague.........

    The past 750 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas.

    We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned

    HOW TO DEAL WITH IT ALL

    And YOU are one of them! CONGRATULATIONS!

    You might want to share this with others who have been fortunate enough to grow up as kids, before the EU, the lawyers and the government regulated our lives for our own good. :D
     
  12. spike7451

    spike7451 RIP

    Yup,And my dad used use the threat of Borstal as well if I did'nt behave!
     
  13. Anyone remember when a night in with the family was a punishment?
    Went through so many pairs of trainers as a kid my Dad would check them everytime I got in.
     
  14. Gentlemen

    It would appear that we have all turned into '4 Yorkshiremen'.

    Altogether now...

    'There were 150 of us living int' shoebox int' middle o't road....'
     
  15. Yep - lead based paints and leaded petrol... the reason they reckon the nation's collective intelligence is below where it should be.

    Some of those have a good point; the rest are just proving that as not so many people die from infectious disease most of the kids born between 1930 and 1970 died or are dying from illnesses like cancer; which they dramatically increased their chances of getting normally through no fault of their own.