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Titanic and Other Ships

#1
I've not seen this posted before so I thought I would considering how much I enjoyed it.

It is available free and you can (if you wish) start reading right away!

This is an autobiography by Charles Lightoller whose claim to fame was that he was the highest ranking member of the Titanic crew to survive. He led a remarkable life, the Titanic being just another dramatic episode to add to all the others.

You can read the book here: Titanic and Other Ships

Unfortunately this book was written before his adventures (in retirement) as a skipper of one of the Dunkirk 'little boats'.

An incredible man, an incredible life and an incredible book highly recommended.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#4
Played by Kenneth More in "A Night to Remember", a film notable for its extensive use of expensive footage shot on behalf of Josef Goebbels for a propaganda 'blockbuster' which was never shown and which was acquired by the British at the end of the war.
 
#6
Played by Kenneth More in "A Night to Remember", a film notable for its extensive use of expensive footage shot on behalf of Josef Goebbels for a propaganda 'blockbuster' which was never shown and which was acquired by the British at the end of the war.


I've seen the movie "A Night To Remember" a number of times (loved that Kenneth Moore) but this is the first time that I've heard that some of the footage used in that production was captured Nazi film that was meant to be used in a Dr. Goebbels propaganda blockbuster. Anybody know what the plot of that film was meant to be?
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#9


I've seen the movie "A Night To Remember" a number of times (loved that Kenneth Moore) but this is the first time that I've heard that some of the footage used in that production was captured Nazi film that was meant to be used in a Dr. Goebbels propaganda blockbuster. Anybody know what the plot of that film was meant to be?
I shall rise above your sceptical tone and blame it on your upbringing. Strangely, the Nazis plot was very similar to James Cameron's plot of choice - decadent English etc etc.
 
#12
#14
The strange sinking of the Nazi Titanic - Telegraph

Much the same though apparently they sank it twice. Bloody two sheds.
Can't remember the book, I'll have to hav a really good thunk later, but there was a 'theory' that the Titanic was actually the Olympic... purposely sunk as a sort of insurance job. Olympic was the elder sister to the Titanic, and the nameship of the Class, but had had naught but bad luck since launch... IIRC the Champagne bottle didn't break on her launch... but I may be wrong, that could have been the Titanic.

The myth was debunked as there were several cosmetic mods made to the Titanic after the Olympic's experience.

Also one of the boats (I think the Titanic) had the Harland and Wolff yard Hull number that read (with a bit of licence) No Pope. Can't remember how it worked, 409093? 360604? Something like that anyway, the predominatly Catholic workforce in Belfast thought it a bad oman.
 
#16
"The Wreck of the Titan" is a bit strange if you are looking for omens and the like

Futility, or the Wreck of the Titan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Oh, I forgot about that... to be honest though given the time of the book it is more the RMS Titanic (and Olympic) met the book rather than anything spooky.

From the wiki, My Red.
Beyond the name, the similarities between the Titanic and the fictional Titan include:[SUP][4][/SUP]


  • Both were triple screw (propeller) At the time seen as 'gold plated' for such steamers.
  • Described as "unsinkable" Some discussion on this, but the drive on this at the time was considerable. Even so, the ships were actually becoming 'more sinkable'. The Great Eastern was actually more robust than Titanic and her peers. The passengers (esp the rich) wanted nice big dining rooms and areas... and certainly not watertight bulkheads. I think one of hte man complains about the Great Eastern was that one had to climb several flights of stairs in order to move through the ship at certain levels... she also had full height and capped bulkheads... Diemensions too, merely reflect the technical aspirations of the time.

    • The Titanic was the world's largest luxury liner (882 feet, displacing 63,000 long tons), and was once described by newspapers as being "practically unsinkable". [SUP][5][/SUP]
    • The Titan was the largest craft afloat and the greatest of the works of men (800 feet, displacing 75,000 tons, up from 45,000 in the 1898 edition), and was considered "unsinkable".
  • Shortage of lifeboats We can't really comprehend this now. But Titanic actually had MORE than the required number of lifeboats. At the time it was perfectly normal for ships to carry 'as few as the law allowed'. Lifeboats cluttered up the first class promenade deck, and obscured the view. Ships were to sink in as long a time as possible, allowing rescue to come.
    • The Titanic carried only 16 lifeboats, plus 4 Engelhardt folding lifeboats,[SUP][6][/SUP] less than half the number required for her passenger and crew capacity of 3000.
    • The Titan carried "as few as the law allowed", 24 lifeboats, less than half needed for her 3000 capacity.
  • Struck an iceberg In April, in the North Atlantic... The story is based on real threats, the real threats are demonstrated in the actual sinking.
    • Moving at 22½ knots, [SUP][7][/SUP] the Titanic struck an iceberg on the starboard side on the night of April 14, 1912 in the North Atlantic 400 miles away from Newfoundland.
    • Also on an April night, in the North Atlantic 400 miles from Newfoundland (Terranova), the Titan hit an iceberg while traveling at 25 knots, also on the starboard side.
  • Sinking loss of life attributed to how many life boats there were, see above.
    • The unsinkable Titanic sank, and more than half of her 2200 passengers and crew died.
    • The indestructible Titan also sank, more than half of her 2500 passengers drowning.
    • Went down bow first, the Titan actually capsizing before it sank.
The name Titan was now doubt picked by a reader of Classical Greek Mythology fitting the 'futility' of the ship in the story, the name Titanic was selected because ALL White Star boats ended with 'ic' (Cunard ended 'ia' ie Carpathia).

And for simlar Classical reasons the Olympic class were to be called Olympic, Titanic and Gigantic after Mount Olympus and those who dwelled there. Olympians (zeus et al), the older Titans and the Gigans.

A German liner (als huge) was named Leviathon.
 
#17
Can't remember the book, I'll have to hav a really good thunk later, but there was a 'theory' that the Titanic was actually the Olympic... purposely sunk as a sort of insurance job. Olympic was the elder sister to the Titanic, and the nameship of the Class, but had had naught but bad luck since launch... IIRC the Champagne bottle didn't break on her launch... but I may be wrong, that could have been the Titanic.

The myth was debunked as there were several cosmetic mods made to the Titanic after the Olympic's experience.

Also one of the boats (I think the Titanic) had the Harland and Wolff yard Hull number that read (with a bit of licence) No Pope. Can't remember how it worked, 409093? 360604? Something like that anyway, the predominately Catholic workforce in Belfast thought it a bad oman.
The bit about the number is just a myth, Titanic's number was 401 (401st ship built by H & W ) and a Board of Trade registration number of 131,428.

Read more: ... So finally the deep gives up its secrets about the titanic - Features, Life & Style - Belfasttelegraph.co.uk

Plus H & W employees were predominately Protestant.
 

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