Tinman Walt

I've just had a thought that mayhap the MDT are playing a delaying game such that I'll run out of time. See what I mean about lack of trust?
Presumably you will brief your next of kin (or other person entrusted to deal with your affairs) to pursue any malpractice / medical negligence claim you may make or may wish to make against your medical practitioners etc in the unlikely event that they are doing as you suspect.

Go get 'em matey.
 
Presumably you will brief your next of kin (or other person entrusted to deal with your affairs) to pursue any malpractice / medical negligence claim you may make or may wish to make against your medical practitioners etc in the unlikely event that they are doing as you suspect.

Go get 'em matey.
Should I not be ent ded before the issue's resolved, that's exactly what I'll be doing.
 
Go the legal route, as already suggested. Put it this way, you've got nothing to lose and everything to gain for your family.
 
I've made a decision. I'm going to contact a local Slater & Gordon firm tomorrow, with a view to sue.

I'm also going to tell my consultant/deputy on Wednesday that I plan to sue, based on what I've written above and tell them to inform the whole MDT that it's time to decide whose best interests they're going to serve, mine or the hospital, and that they may want to revisit all scans, reports etc.

I've just found out that if a surgeon is going to put anything inside a patient, that is to remain, it should be put in the notes and the patient informed.

I'll keep the Arrserati informed.

Thanks again folks.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
I've made a decision. I'm going to contact a local Slater & Gordon firm tomorrow, with a view to sue.

I'm also going to tell my consultant/deputy on Wednesday that I plan to sue, based on what I've written above and tell them to inform the whole MDT that it's time to decide whose best interests they're going to serve, mine or the hospital, and that they may want to revisit all scans, reports etc.

I've just found out that if a surgeon is going to put anything inside a patient, that is to remain, it should be put in the notes and the patient informed.

I'll keep the Arrserati informed.

Thanks again folks.
Tell them nothing at all until you've sought legal advice I'd suggest.
 
As just posted get legal advice.

If you contact the Law Society they will give you a list of solicitors/barristers who specialise in medical negligence cases remembering that you can only get a barrister via solicitor.
Nope. The law has changed. There are now Barristers (or Chambers) who can punt directly for public contact, and Solicitors who can present in Court (Solicitor Advocates?).
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
What I've done is print out my post to provide the solicitors the relevant info without me burblin' and go from there. Will wait to see what mercurydancer has to say. Not in any unions.
Just worry you'd show everyone your hand and there's no reason why you can't advise your consultant that you aren't happy without giving everything away. NHS duty of candour says we should apologise straight away, it cuts down on claims.
 
Just worry you'd show everyone your hand and there's no reason why you can't advise your consultant that you aren't happy without giving everything away. NHS duty of candour says we should apologise straight away, it cuts down on claims.
There's also the point that my MDT and everybody else in my cancer care and bowel doings has been wonderful, except for one nursing assistant who was offended by my stoma and having to empty it. None of them are responsible for the RSI and I'll need ongoing care from them all. My perception of a cover-up may be false, so I think I'm going to dismiss the thought for the present.

And I'd be suing the hospital, the surgeon is either retired or dead. I liked him as well. Basically, it was a mistake, though one that shouldn't have been made, if indeed I'm right. But if I am right, I want coin.

For over 20 years I've been unemployable, due to the time I've had to spend on the shitter, apart from a brief spell taxi driving until I collapsed at the wheel.
 
Just worry you'd show everyone your hand and there's no reason why you can't advise your consultant that you aren't happy without giving everything away. NHS duty of candour says we should apologise straight away, it cuts down on claims.
True. It's an unfortunate fact that otherwise professional people who react defensively to any issue, rather than admitting "This is going / has gone, wrong" are more likely to create the instigation of a claim.

From personal experience (no medical negligence claimed); After being discharged from hospital (secondary glamour moment - The hospital, and even the surgeon who operated on me have been on TV!), I exhibited a non MR SA infection. Cue another 10 days in hospital, and 6 weeks of "visit every day via nurse", followed by 6 weeks large quantity of antibiotics pills.

They admitted "We didn't get this quite right in your case". They said "We'll sort it", and they did.

They admitted, rather than denied the problem. They owned (as in accepted) the problem. Then they solved the problem. Cudos!
 
My o
My pelvic mass - this is to bring things up to date and to ask for ARRSERS' opinions as I may be slightly biased. First we need a bit of background.

In 1997, I had an abdominal rectopexy with Ivalon mesh to repair a full thickness rectal prolapse. The technique stitches a cut-to-size sheet of Ivalon sponge to the sacrum. Two 'arms' are then wrapped around and stitched to the rectum. The sponge encircles about two thirds of the rectum. The rectum can be stitched directly to the sacrum but the theory is, that the use of sponge increases scarring and fibrosis, making for a more permanent solution. Attaching the rectum to the sacrum by any method, stops it from prolapsing. Surgical sponges can be made of various stuff but it's important to note that gauze swabs are also known as surgical sponges. So that's the background.

Shortly after my cancer diagnosis, when I'd had various scans, I was informed that I had a mass in my pelvis. It's size is about 10 cms by 8 cms by 8 cms. While consulting with my bone doctor, she showed me my CT scan and as well as various bone lesions, she showed me the mass with, 'Nobody's seen anything like this before but we don't think it's anything to do with the myeloma'. The mass was pale with little dark squiggles lines in it and she seemed concerned about the squiggly lines. I said, 'Could it be something to do with the rectopexy'? - 'Oh, you've had a rectopexy, have you, we didn't know that'? 'I bet they've left something inside me', said I, 'somebody's gonna get sued'. My immediate thought.

When I got home I googled stuff left inside after operation and the first image result, that I now can't find, had a picture of an almost identical mass, with squiggly lines. This confirmed my suspicions.

Note - A mass created by a sponge is called a gossypiboma or a textiloma and anything left behind after surgery is known as an RSI, a retained surgical instrument. When diagnosed with cancer there's a mult-disciplinary team (MDT) put together, with various specialists who discuss your case and decide treatment options etc.

The radiologist's report of my CT scan, talking about the mass, suggested maybe some sort of pouch had been created and either the relevant surgeon should be spoken to or the operation report studied. No mention of RSI although supposedly a radiologist is trained to spot them.

I was told after defecography that the rectopexy was still properly in place, as they could see it. No mention of any mass but defecography might not have shown it.

A needle biopsy was done and the report stated that the mass contained necrotic tissue and had a linear element. My suggestion that this pointed to something man-made was rebutted with 'Not necessarily'.

When I asked about the operation report, I was told that records were only held for a certain number of years and might not be available but she'd look. This was the consultant assigned to monitor the mass. She also said it was inoperable, as it would damage nerves and make me worse off.

The latest visit to her last week and she told me that all the reports (she didn't specifically mention seeing the operation report) and stuff she'd read made her quite happy that some sort of sponge was placed deliberately to generate the response and this was to help hold the rectopexy. The first acknowledgement that there was something man-made inside me. At first hearing this seemed reasonable, given that that's why sponges are used. But does it stand up to scrutiny.

I can find nothing in any of the literature that suggests the placement of a random bit of sponge, in order to create a mass that could, and did in my case, lead to severe consequences. There's also nothing in the operation report, which took me less than a minute to find, to say any other sponge was placed in situ, other than the one previously described above as a usual technique.

As I see it there are three options -

1. The sponge inserted has degraded and a piece has come off and caused the mass. Sponges do deteriorate and can do all sorts of damage. Possible but the squiggly lines suggest the radiopaque thread in a gauze sponge, specifically put there so that RSIs can be seen.

2. The surgeon used a technique that is not in the literature and did not mention it to me or put it in the operation report. In other words, used me as an experiment. Doesn't seem feasible given there was no sort of follow-up to monitor this 'experiment'.

3. What I consider the most rational explanation, is that the mass is a textiloma, caused by an RSI, left in negligently.

It seems to me that the everybody has gone out of their way to suggest various things except for an RSI. An RSI is not even mentioned as a possibility and it is this omission that points to an RSI being the case. It's the elephant in the room.

This is all leading to a possible lack of trust in my medical team; do they have my best interests at heart or the best interests of the hospital and the team that did the rectopexy?

I see my haematologist on Wednesday or possibly her nurse, for my 3 monthly cancer check. I don't know whether to make my case or leave it until some future date. I'm going to speak to my GP tomorrow to see if she suggests getting a second opinion from a different hospital, initiate proceedings by making a complaint or seek legal advice. I'll be clear now, it's about the money.

So as you can see, I'm biased. Given what I've stated above, I'd be interested in the opinions of ARRSERS
My old man had a hernia done, left a sponge in and the resulting infection caused his to have to get a temp colostomy and almost killed him. He looked into suing the NHS and after a lot of time- the medical system seemed to close ranks and shut him out. A few months after finally getting his stomach/ass in order and he got a huge stroke shortly after his medical check said he was in great condition. I hope you are more successful ;)
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
There's also the point that my MDT and everybody else in my cancer care and bowel doings has been wonderful, except for one nursing assistant who was offended by my stoma and having to empty it. None of them are responsible for the RSI and I'll need ongoing care from them all. My perception of a cover-up may be false, so I think I'm going to dismiss the thought for the present.

And I'd be suing the hospital, the surgeon is either retired or dead. I liked him as well. Basically, it was a mistake, though one that shouldn't have been made, if indeed I'm right. But if I am right, I want coin.

For over 20 years I've been unemployable, due to the time I've had to spend on the shitter, apart from a brief spell taxi driving until I collapsed at the wheel.
My partners dad had a hernia repair, went to visit him he was jaundiced and it got worse.
Seems after a week they told us his spleen was removed and he’d have to take antibiotics forever.
I thought sloppy surgeon he’s caught spleen with the knife, told him to claim.
He said he wouldn’t claim as the surgeon was a lovely bloke, always smiling, shook his hand every time he saw him etc.
Then he was on telly Ingoldsby I think was his name, botched up others at Pinderfields. Nice chap though.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
True. It's an unfortunate fact that otherwise professional people who react defensively to any issue, rather than admitting "This is going / has gone, wrong" are more likely to create the instigation of a claim.

From personal experience (no medical negligence claimed); After being discharged from hospital (secondary glamour moment - The hospital, and even the surgeon who operated on me have been on TV!), I exhibited a non MR SA infection. Cue another 10 days in hospital, and 6 weeks of "visit every day via nurse", followed by 6 weeks large quantity of antibiotics pills.

They admitted "We didn't get this quite right in your case". They said "We'll sort it", and they did.

They admitted, rather than denied the problem. They owned (as in accepted) the problem. Then they solved the problem. Cudos!
We are supposed to cough up straight away and apologise which is right and fair when we’ve made mistakes.
I do see about medics admitting mistakes and getting disciplined still, this shouldn’t happen but does. We can’t expect people to be honest if they risk sanctions, well if they’re negligent that’s different, mistakes, then no.
Doctor recently struck off for her admission of fault.
 
Good to hear that you still ent dead.
Don't trust any of them and do take early legal advice. Your posts certainly suggest that you have a strong case for them to answer. Best of British luck!
:thumleft:
 
True. It's an unfortunate fact that otherwise professional people who react defensively to any issue, rather than admitting "This is going / has gone, wrong" are more likely to create the instigation of a claim.

From personal experience (no medical negligence claimed); After being discharged from hospital (secondary glamour moment - The hospital, and even the surgeon who operated on me have been on TV!), I exhibited a non MR SA infection. Cue another 10 days in hospital, and 6 weeks of "visit every day via nurse", followed by 6 weeks large quantity of antibiotics pills.

They admitted "We didn't get this quite right in your case". They said "We'll sort it", and they did.

They admitted, rather than denied the problem. They owned (as in accepted) the problem. Then they solved the problem. Cudos!
I've been telling medicos for over 20 years that I had a physical blockage. Had somebody accepted this and done a scan, my mass would have been discovered. Maybe it would have been operable if found sooner.

My own GP admitted that I'd been right all along, the only one to do so, so far.

I might have reacted differently had anybody found the problem and owned it but now it's about the coin. Fuck 'em.
 
My o

My old man had a hernia done, left a sponge in and the resulting infection caused his to have to get a temp colostomy and almost killed him. He looked into suing the NHS and after a lot of time- the medical system seemed to close ranks and shut him out. A few months after finally getting his stomach/ass in order and he got a huge stroke shortly after his medical check said he was in great condition. I hope you are more successful ;)
Sorry to hear that. I read earlier today that there's two incidences of RTI a week in England, despite the measures in place to prevent these 'never events'. 'Never' as in should never happen.
 
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