Time to cut Ulster loose?

Should NI be cut loose

  • Time for a province independence referendum

    Votes: 25 31.3%
  • Union with the south

    Votes: 21 26.3%
  • Commonwealth status

    Votes: 9 11.3%
  • Full rule from Westminster

    Votes: 19 23.8%
  • Home rule from Stormont

    Votes: 20 25.0%

  • Total voters
    80
I think the difference is that most parts of England accept they are part of a single entity.
Amended proof copy, and even then the Cornish and Yorkshire are probably exceptions. Cornwall used to be called West Wales so that would be an easy solution, Yorkshire, Eh lad that's reet different crock of Sh*te.

I have floated the break up of England before, Northumbria, Mercia, Wessex and Londinium Maxima, but I don't think there is the general feeling for it amongst the population. Apparently just under 1200 years is long enough for the Angle, Saxon and Dane to forget where they came from.
 
You could be in luck. She also said in the event of a UI she’d be leaving..
I wonder where she thinks she'd be going, Argentina might work, they just wiped the natives out so no problem, immigrants rule, but oops they're Catholic.
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
I wonder where she thinks she'd be going, Argentina might work, they just wiped the natives out so no problem, immigrants rule, but oops they're Catholic.
She’s putting a brave face on being nice to Catholics at the moment, visiting sporting orgs and everyone trying not to look embarrassed. Seriously I don’t think she’d take too well at being uprooted. A lot of the Border hillbillies don’t get any further than Queens and the big city.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
It just seems a very specific objection. You earn money, you pay taxes. Nowt we can do about it. Might as well object to the Sun rising in the morning...
I can object to it being spent where it isn't earned!
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Tongue in cheek, but if that’s the criteria for cutting elements of the UK loose, it’s gonna be a small kingdom. United Kingdom of central London and associated boroughs?
No, the criteria is clearly democracy, no effing point in all the treasure, blood and sweat otherwise!
 

ugly

LE
Moderator

ugly

LE
Moderator
NI quits UK and unites with ROI no UK funding,
within a fortnight welcome to the new Albania.
A mate has just returned from a month there, I quite fancy a visit!
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
That would almost make filling in a tax return fun.
Perhaps we could offer options like decide upon a % for NI would give you certain other benefits like having a go on Colleen!
 
Could RoI afford to police N.I?
No. We're pretty much tapped out since the Big Bust. While the economy is on the up, the national debt is huge, up around the €200 billion mark. Theoretically it's 78% of GDP but that GDP figure is skewed by some dodgy book keeping by the likes of Google and various airlines IIRC. The phrase Leprechaun Economics was mentioned in 2016. Bottom line we owe a sh1tload of money to a lot of people. It's a frightenng thought that we are closer to the next bust than we are to the last one.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
No. We're pretty much tapped out since the Big Bust. While the economy is on the up, the national debt is huge, up around the €200 billion mark. Theoretically it's 78% of GDP but that GDP figure is skewed by some dodgy book keeping by the likes of Google and various airlines IIRC. The phrase Leprechaun Economics was mentioned in 2016. Bottom line we owe a sh1tload of money to a lot of people. It's a frightenng thought that we are closer to the next bust than we are to the last one.
It's OK we can lend you the money at least its not spaffed at the lazy feckers in the North. In theory we will have something over you
 
No. We're pretty much tapped out since the Big Bust. While the economy is on the up, the national debt is huge, up around the €200 billion mark. Theoretically it's 78% of GDP but that GDP figure is skewed by some dodgy book keeping by the likes of Google and various airlines IIRC. The phrase Leprechaun Economics was mentioned in 2016. Bottom line we owe a sh1tload of money to a lot of people. It's a frightenng thought that we are closer to the next bust than we are to the last one.
Thank you for that information.
Re. being closer to the next bust (I agree), a no deal Brexit would have a hugely negative impact on Ireland. Given that, I wonder why Varadker (sic) seems to be being so unhelpful to the UK?
 
... I wonder why Varadker (sic) seems to be being so unhelpful to the UK?
Because we'll need the EU and the ECB again. We're tied to the EU and so have to sing from the same hymn sheet. But also there's a hope or belief that Brexit brings Irish unification a bit closer. And all sides in Irish politics are committed to that goal to one extent or another. Fianna Fail and Fine Gael have the same DNA as Sinn Féin. FG was formed (many years on) from the Shinners that supported the Anglo-Irish Treaty in 1922. FF was formed in 1926 from the Shinners that lost the Civil War but who wanted to abandon SF's abstention from Dáil Éireann. They all take slightly different paths and do less wittering about unification in the South because very few people give a Fiddler's on a day to day basis. But essentially all Parties support the long term goal of unification. As long as the Tories don't invent a hard border, Leo Varadker doesn't care one way or the other what the British do.
 
Me neither. I ...., have no issues with the Will of the Majority, which is, after all, what it's been all about for the past hundred years or so.
I would agree with most of what you say, but I can't but help recall the democratic result of the first post-WWI general election (a British General Election) in which Sinn Fein won 73 of the 105 Irish Seats. Possibly the first, and probably the last time a single party won something around 70 per cent of the seats.

In 1914 the Irish were promised Home Rule by virtue of the 'Government of Ireland Act (4 & 5 Geo.5 C 90) , 1914' - the first parliamentary Act passed into law to provide for devolved government in the UK. But....due to the onset of WWI, a simultaneous 'Suspension' Act was also introduced to suspend implementation for the duration of the War (thought by many to take only around six months).

Despite the overwhelming electoral win for Sinn Fein at the end of the War, the now fabled difference between what Michael Collins brought back from London and what the radical Republicans actually wanted, the result was the Irish War of Independence and thus, no implementation.

When the matter was finally resolved through the 'Government of Ireland Act, 1920' whereby the intent was to enable Home Rule to both the South and separately to the North. The terms defining the North and its structures were written into the Act in such a way as to geographically define an area in which the Unionists could retain political control and the Special Powers granted thereof, remained in situ until repealed by the UK government in 1972.

There is a lot more in terms of detail, but my point is that irrespective of the attempts to claim 'democratic' solutions to the issue of Ireland, the causes of the 'fine mess' we face today (let alone 68-2007) are firmly rooted in the fact that democratic processes were never followed to fruition. And it is extraordinary that within the myriad of processes that brought us to where we are today, there are two particular points that appear to be hiding under the radar that illustrate the degree of skullduggary that co-joins the Conservative & Unionist Party (properly so called):

The first is that when the British Army wanted to reduce the tension in NI in 1971 by having the (then) Sovereign Authority for Security (Stormont) ban all marches, Brian Faulkner (NI PM), having first agreed, then changed his mind and demanded 'Internment' as his price for a ban on marches.

Ted Heath was at the time attempting to take the UK in to the European Economic Community and it is often stated that because of this he was unwilling to prorogue an elected assembly during such negotiations. In reality, Heath needed the 8 Unionist votes to pass the Accession Act and when the vote was held in January 1973, it passed in the House of Commons......by 8 votes! There would be further votes, but the Accession was the critical one and Heath duly signed the UK up within days. No longer requiring the Unionists votes, within 8 weeks he prorogued Stormont and introduced Direct Rule. Now jump ahead to 2018......and guess whose votes are required to take the UK out of Europe?

Edited to add that the OP is possibly very timely indeed. If history repeats itself, then after 29 March 2019, the North of Ireland, be it Ulster or Northern Ireland, might just find itself facing a Brexit of its own - a Referendum in deed, but quite possibly one that doesn't ask the anticipated question, but asks the mainland population whether it wishes to retain links with the 'six counties'.
 
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