Tim Collins supports mercenaries?

#2
OldRedCap said:
ORC this or something similar was published by the same mag in Dec 06 or Jan 07 with another 'Headline' I believe it was also debated on Arrse... somewhere. I cannot find the link at the moment...its not my fault, somebody left the brandy out. :thumright:
 
#4
Working for Aegis given the mention they get in the Acknowledgements section of his book:'I am grateful for the friendship of Lieutenant Colonel Tim Spicer OBE, Ronnie Patterson and all the staff at Aegis Defence Systems who gave me things to do when I was bored with writing...'

Things to do indeed...
 
#5
LankyPullThrough said:
Working for Aegis given the mention they get in the Acknowledgements section of his book:'I am grateful for the friendship of Lieutenant Colonel Tim Spicer OBE, Ronnie Patterson and all the staff at Aegis Defence Systems who gave me things to do when I was bored with writing...'

Things to do indeed...
I must say I'm shocked I had imagined a bit of photocopying.
 
#6
Mercenaries didn't always use to be a dirty word (like crevice). Medieval times had many mercs (like genoese crossbowmen) working fairly effectively for the french and italians. German Landsnecks and swiss pikmen were the renaissance mercs of note.

While it wasn't an honourable job, certainly nothing to be ashamed of ... and occasionally extremely well paid.
Tim Collins is a smart guy and knows his history ... Wither Aegis or any other merc company is up to providing a decent peacekeeping force is another matter entirely!
 
#7
Would it really be so bad? The main problems to nail down that I can see is who would be in charge and legal responsibilities - if any of the contractors did anything wrong who do they answer to. If you can sort those out, have the funding and try to hire only from the respectable - a subjective term I know - end of the market it could work in places like Africa. When all you have to do is stump up the cash rather than put national personnels lives on the line, I think countries would probably be more open to intervening in situations.
 
#8
rabid_hamster said:
Mercenaries didn't always use to be a dirty word (like crevice). Medieval times had many mercs (like genoese crossbowmen) working fairly effectively for the french and italians. German Landsnecks and swiss pikmen were the renaissance mercs of note.

While it wasn't an honourable job, certainly nothing to be ashamed of ... and occasionally extremely well paid.
Tim Collins is a smart guy and knows his history ... Wither Aegis or any other merc company is up to providing a decent peacekeeping force is another matter entirely!
To your examples I suppose you could add the armies of the East India Company before 1857: if not the private military companies of today then the military of a private company effectively subcontracted to work in defence of/pursuit of a national interest.

Peacekeeping the UN could be seen to do well: when two sides want to stop fighting they can help out. Stopping people who want to fight from fighting is another matter. Maybe there are cases where the the UN could contract PMCs to 'even out' conflicts to the point where no side is confident of militarily realising their aims and want to make peace, cue the UN....
 
#9
Mercenary..second oldest job in the world!!
 
#10
Cuddles said:
Mercenary..second oldest job in the world!!
What came first, the chicken or the egg?

I think that the other profession came second to service the needs of the mercenaries.

On a serious note, IMHO there are no merceneries without some sort of official sanction from one of the big boys in the G8 or Davos playground.

Thats DAVOS the place, not DAVROS the dalek.
 
#11
There is a continuing use of mercenries that has ocurred in Europe for centuries. The worst culprit is the Vactican for employing all of those damned Swiss guard. :thumright:
 
#12
TheHelpfulStacker said:
Hasn't Tim Collins got a bit of an ulterior motive over this, allegedly.
What motive is that then?

I can't see him needing to stir up emotions to gain media coverage.

He is also very charismatic and can throw a wonderful tantrum (not nice to be on the end of).

I personally don't like the man (because he told me off), but i do respect him (because he apologised).
 
#14
#15
MikeMcc said:
There is a continuing use of mercenries that has ocurred in Europe for centuries. The worst culprit is the Vactican for employing all of those damned Swiss guard. :thumright:
...... and 'our' use of Gurkas?
 
#16
Call them what you will: Mercenaries; contractors; PSD; advisers; or even, BATT. At the end of the day they are mercenaries, some do it for another country, some for a company and others for their own country.

We use Gurkha's.

Back in 1778 we used Germans to kick Yankee butt, specifically about 30,000 Hessian Mercenaries hired to GB by their respective Princes. On the other side of the coin the Yankees were using French Naval and Infantry to kick british butt.

June 18th, 1815, Waterloo. Wellington used Prussian mercenaries to give Napolean a good seeing to.

Africa has seen no end of 'mercenary actions', most during the cold war period supported by one side of the iron curtain or the other. Diamond and gold field employee protection being the mainstay of employment between small conflicts.

Not forgetting Rhodesia, I remember having a recruiting pamphlet thrust into my hand in Aldershot. A few chaps went and then came back again.

Southern and Central America have also had their share of mercenary activity, based mainly around the drug trade.

Lebanon was also an active area back in the 80's, I knew a chap who took 2 weeks leave, when he came back he had to explain to the Brigadier and a 'civilian' how he got stuck in Lebanon for 6 months. Two years later he was in Central America.........not coffee farming.

Afgahnistan back in the 80's was also an open ground for anyone wanting to make a buck, acquisition of Soviet kit to sell to intelligence agencies being the main activity.

Its been around forever, and it'll be around for a while yet.
 
#17
Afgahnistan back in the 80's was also an open ground for anyone wanting to make a buck, acquisition of Soviet kit to sell to intelligence agencies being the main activity.

Or even test firing surface to air Brit/American stuff against the Soviet 'H' series helios.
 
#18
bob_lawlaw said:
Afgahnistan back in the 80's was also an open ground for anyone wanting to make a buck, acquisition of Soviet kit to sell to intelligence agencies being the main activity.

Or even test firing surface to air Brit/American stuff against the Soviet 'H' series helios.
Hmm. I think a couple of training manulas were re-written after some input from 'freelancers' back then. Rumour is that men with suitcases full of money are trying to buy back 'old stock' of said items to prevent their use at the moment.
 

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