Three Brigadiers in three months - sacked or suspended…

Seems he fitted in as a RNLI lifeboat helmsman on the Thames for over six years, both full time and volunteer. He must have fitted in. I would imagine if he was a pompous official type his crews would have soon f*cked him off.
As a follow-up to this, I came across this post of his;
<<
The best thing I did working for @hrp_Palaces was to join Tower RNLI . After 11 years of vol & full time service and 613 service calls today I start last 3 days on the boat. Will miss crew and river. Proud to be RNLI &
Proud Sappers
>>

Not a bad record
 
Ditto, but tangentially.

In the knowledge that leavers of any hue had email sifted through by HR, I had an Outlook directory named"get out of jail free", which was on auto-copy to my private address.
I wonder how your compliance dept dealt with this GDPR fail and lack of confidentiality?

Must have had some epic skeletons...
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
If I haven't told at least five people to fu{k off, called 10 people cu^ts and thrown several hammers around in a day then I'm probably on leave. I do enjoy when I get several woooperts a week popping into the workshop for a brew, some top level sweary-rants and some constructive deconstruction.

We aren't a huggy happy-clapper community. If people haven't got the onions to put up with some fruity language or respond in turn with a quality 5 star kunty comebacks then maybe this ain't the right job for them.

The Roman view, which has much to commend it, was that no-one was fit to command others until they could command themselves.
 

Truxx

LE
I’ve heard that. The latest Defence Support Strategy makes the creation of a ‘Support Corps’ much more likely in the future.
There was much talk at the time of a "Quartermaster Corps". But that was too much for the market to bear. In any event such an entity would have (as I recall) been about 40% of the Army.
 

Truxx

LE
Now here is something odd.

As a Major I had a very hard time in one particular appointment. These days I am sure it would be classed as bullying. There were times when, after a particular savage period, I would find myself throwing up in the bogs. It was relentless.

Yet paradoxically the job, and getting through it relatively unscathed was one of the best things that happened to me and I survived, and indeed thrived, as a result.

I would not wish it on anyone though.
 
3 sacked Brigadiers equals 3 delighted Colonels
No, twenty anticipatory Colonels, three delighted ones and a rash of early retirements (once two years seniority have accrued).
 
[DRIFT]

It is remotely possible that I am wrong, but from memory that is where it began. Which has always struck me as odd because if there had to be some amalgamation (to resolve the actual issue at hand) then a RAOC/REME mash up was the more obvious way to go . . . .
I’ve heard that. The latest Defence Support Strategy makes the creation of a ‘Support Corps’ much more likely in the future.
There was much talk at the time of a "Quartermaster Corps". But that was too much for the market to bear. In any event such an entity would have (as I recall) been about 40% of the Army.

Today, I have been having a rant on another thread, about the absurdity of expecting efficiencies (and economies), from the inappropriate merger, across different functions and disciplines.

I’ll copy it across here . . . although I may - subsequently - finesse the arguments ;) .

@TamH70 , has identified the main problem . . . that "We don't have enough warm bodies" !!

But, to then organise those that we do have, into an amorphous, anonymous, indistinguishable mass . . . or MESS . . . is NOT the solution !!

If the abortion of an aberration that is the RLC teaches us anything . . . it is that such cross-function mergers, result in the reduction of trade specific expertise; loss of control and management of individual functions; abandonment of core principles; all of which may be represented within - and, maintained by - the SNCOs of the "Forming Corps", but will be lost within a generation of SNCO being appointed from within the (now) merged "Super Corps".

It is unfortunate that @oscar1whisky has such a life experience, that it has led to a misunderstanding of the role and function of officers :( !!

To better illustrate my arguement, it may be possible to use as an extreme example . . . a multi-discipline, civilian manufacturing operation. Applying what has been suggested in this thread today, all the "managers" would be removed from the different functions . . . the canteen/catering . . . the stores/purchasing/supply . . . all the different individual manufacturing/assembly operations . . . the multitude of office support, wages, HR, patents/legal . . . security . . . etc..

And, it is suggested - today in this thread - that "supervisors" from each specific, individual, function could be moved from one area to another . . . that they would all continue to operate seamlessly and efficiently.

I think NOT !! Now transfer that scenario, from the local industrial estate, into a combat zone and add in fatigue, stress, uncertainty, and that the unit is trying to kill the enemy that is - in turn - trying to kill them, and it is suggested that today's "New Military Doctrine of Misplaced Jointery" as espoused on ARRSE, is at best misplaced and at worse counterproductive and dangerous !!

[/DRIFT]
 

Truxx

LE
[DRIFT]





Today, I have been having a rant on another thread, about the absurdity of expecting efficiencies (and economies), from the inappropriate merger, across different functions and disciplines.

I’ll copy it across here . . . although I may - subsequently - finesse the arguments ;) .



[/DRIFT]
Silly boy.

Nothing to do with efficiency.

Teeth arms
The rest (ripe for contractorisation)
 
The Death Stare
When he was GOC UKLF, he was the inspecting officer at the end-of-year parade for our school (yes, QVS is strange that way). I'd read his book (it was in the school library), so I knew his background.

I just remember a very, very piercing gaze during a brief few words. Because of course I stared back, I was sixteen...
 
In the late Jurassic I was 2ic of a unit. I was, by default, the ham in the sandwich: on one hand a despotic, career obsessed CO, On the other a hapless bunch of - largely - good blokes wanting to do the best that they could (in their one command appointment). Shortly after deploying on yet another “look how good we are” exercise I was hit by blinding headaches, so severe that I was blinded for increasingly long periods and pain, I dare to suggest, that would make a fair comparison with labour (no, not Labour, labour). In the end I pulled the plug on the exercise, with a tirade about not being hard enough nor dedicated to the cause of getting the CO at least an OBE and promoted, and bailed to the MRS. We had a female CMO. When I crawled in and “confessed” that I’d got on the Jack bus, she simply said that she was amazed that I’d been that long: all the other command element had already been to see her.
Her verdict; if I kept on going, the constriction of my blood to the brain would leave me blind. Her prescription; two weeks bed rest with more drugs than a Harlem dealer would see in a lifetime. The CO’s reaction? True to form, a sarcastic dressing down and a very adverse comment on my OJAR.
Fast forward a few years and I was visited by our man in Glasgow who told me that the then CO had, yes, got a deployment, got the OBE and the automatic elevation to the peerage and was, as soon as humanly possible, sent as far away from the U.K. Army into a DA appointment.

Moral? None. The shits often float to the top of the sewer. We, the sludge below, can only bemoan the acceptance of the status quo
 
Last edited:

Boxy

GCM
I note that RC Cadets Branch have recently been torn to bits by an Army Inspectorate Report into their safeguarding.

I note that, entirely co-incidentally, the 1* in charge of the Branch is taking unscheduled early retirement to become Deputy CE of an RFCA instead.

I am shocked at these obviously entirely unrelated incidents.
Interesting, any links?
 
Yes.

Women are usually more subtle, but more tenacious (obsessive) in their bullying methods - at least in my experience. They are also very quick to turn the tables and play the victim card when they are challenged.

Most of the bullying incidents I've encountered in the civilian workplace were female on female and some were really nasty. Male bullies can also be exceptionally devious and are good at covering their tracks, but usually tend to be more physical and confrontational. Often it's about male pecking orders and the offer of a square go where there are no cameras and no witnesses will sometimes resolve a situation.
That used to happen when I was attached to the Irish Guards, strangely enough not to me though as I had a bit of a reputation of putting people on their arrse and was known for standing up for myself. Bullying for me personally tended to be by people in my own Corps, the Regiments I was attached to generally treated me very well (stand fast The Coldstream Guards).
 
Or "why can't I get my tanks fixed?"

The 1* cry that caused the Logistic Support Review and the formation of the RLC.
It is remotely possible that I am wrong, but from memory that is where it began. Which has always struck me as odd because if there had to be some amalgamation (to resolve the actual issue at hand) then a RAOC/REME mash up was the more obvious way to go . . .
I’ve heard that. The latest Defence Support Strategy makes the creation of a ‘Support Corps’ much more likely in the future.

It may come as no surprise that during my thirty plus years in uniform, I have been offered violence by other officers . . . what may be more of a surprise, is that it was ONLY on two occasions . . . but, on both of those occasions, it was from RAOC officers, on different occasions, years apart . . . when I strenuously, purposefully, explained to them, that their obstinacy, inflexibility, and overly conscientious adherence to archaic doctrinaire practises, were (theoretically - it was on Ex !!), jeopardising lives !!

I don’t think it is a misunderstanding, or inappropriate, to describe the RCT as having a “go-getting” attitude to fulfilling their tasks and responsibilities . . . certainly not within all the many units with which I have been associated. Even when we had a philosophy of holding supplies “on wheels”, I was uncomfortable, wanting to get them delivered, and again re-load . . .

The RAOC sources things/commodities, stores them, counts them, and then counts them againagainst the documentation that they have produced, to record what they have received and issued – and, in my experience totally oblivious to the situation/pressures of the rest of the Army with which they are operating . . . inevitably the RCT, eager to get-on-with-the-job !!

I baulked, and railed-against, the merger of the two different, incompatible philosophies, the practices and principles, that distinguish the two major “forming Corps” of the RLC.


The examples of tanks not (yet) been repaired, of REME been short of parts/spares, cannot, will not, be resolved by merging REME with the very organisation that is responsible for not having, for withholding, for not releasing, the required stores. It is the shortage, the obstinacy, and the inflexibility, within the supply function that needs to be resolved !!
 

Yokel

LE
The Roman view, which has much to commend it, was that no-one was fit to command others until they could command themselves.

I thought that this was the basis of all Officer training - and leadership training for other ranks/ratings? I was not impressed when I saw a bunch of newbie Reservists being screamed at for minor dress snags by a fat ****** who may have achieved a commission but was unable to tuck his shirt in, and tucked his tie into his breast pocket.

In the late Jurassic I was 2ic of a unit. I was, by default, the ham in the sandwich: on one hand a despotic, career obsessed CO, On the other a hapless bunch of - largely - good blokes wanting to do the best that they could (in their one command appointment). Shortly after deploying on yet another “look how good we are” exercise I was hit by blinding headaches, so severe that I was blinded for increasingly long periods and pain, I dare to suggest, that would make a fair comparison with labour (no, not Labour, labour). In the end I pulled the plug on the exercise, with a tirade about not being hard enough nor dedicated to the cause of getting the CO at least an OBE and promoted, and bailed to the MRS. We had a female CMO. When I crawled in and “confessed” that I’d got on the Jack bus, she simply said that she was amazed that I’d been that long: all the other command element had already been to see her.
Her verdict; if I kept on going, the constriction of my blood to the brain would leave me blind. Her prescription; two weeks bed rest with more drugs than a Harlem dealer would see in a lifetime. The CO’s reaction? True to form, a sarcastic dressing down and a very adverse comment on my OJAR.
Fast forward a few years and I was visited by our man in Glasgow who told me that the then CO had, yes, got a deployment, got the OBE and the automatic elevation to the presage and was, as soon as humanly possible, sent as far away from the U.K. Army into a DA appointment.

Moral? None. The shits often float to the top of the sewer. We, the sludge below, can only bemoan the acceptance of the status quo

What exactly empowers COs and the like to disregard medical advice?
 
. . . What exactly empowers COs and the like to disregard medical advice?
From what @rickshaw described, it was he - and others - who sought treatment/advice, from the MRS . . NOT the ARRSE of a CO.
 
How do I access this, WITHOUT spending £35 ?! ;) .
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
It may come as no surprise that during my thirty plus years in uniform, I have been offered violence by other officers . . . what may be more of a surprise, is that it was ONLY on two occasions . . . but, on both of those occasions, it was from RAOC officers, on different occasions, years apart . . . when I strenuously, purposefully, explained to them, that their obstinacy, inflexibility, and overly conscientious adherence to archaic doctrinaire practises, were (theoretically - it was on Ex !!), jeopardising lives !!

I don’t think it is a misunderstanding, or inappropriate, to describe the RCT as having a “go-getting” attitude to fulfilling their tasks and responsibilities . . . certainly not within all the many units with which I have been associated. Even when we had a philosophy of holding supplies “on wheels”, I was uncomfortable, wanting to get them delivered, and again re-load . . .

The RAOC sources things/commodities, stores them, counts them, and then counts them againagainst the documentation that they have produced, to record what they have received and issued – and, in my experience totally oblivious to the situation/pressures of the rest of the Army with which they are operating . . . inevitably the RCT, eager to get-on-with-the-job !!

I baulked, and railed-against, the merger of the two different, incompatible philosophies, the practices and principles, that distinguish the two major “forming Corps” of the RLC.


The examples of tanks not (yet) been repaired, of REME been short of parts/spares, cannot, will not, be resolved by merging REME with the very organisation that is responsible for not having, for withholding, for not releasing, the required stores. It is the shortage, the obstinacy, and the inflexibility, within the supply function that needs to be resolved !!
The 1970s called - they want you back.
 

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