thougts on the new l114a1 cadet target rifle

#1
the new cadet forces L114A1 .22lr target rifle. has just entered service after a £6 million contract and I want to know what you guys think.

good investment or should we have stuck the NO.8?
 
#3
Never seen it but was talking to someone who has used it and they said it was a clunky bit of rubbish, nowhere near as good as the number 8.
 
#4
Won't know until I get the chance to put some rounds down.

And watched a wee 12yo try the WHT.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#5
Its a Canadian built Savage, the chambers will be rusty on delivery, don't worry, this will be how they will look after each use and any period of storage longer than 12 hours. You will need to get on top of stoppage drills as failure to extract will be a common event!
 

W21A

War Hero
Book Reviewer
#6
Still using the No8. Rumour control says the new rifle is having 'issues'. I always felt that they should have gone for the SAKO - mind you, I'm not a 'specialist'. However, something optimised for target shooting rather than cadet use is what you get when you give something to the specialists.

Edit - PS - I really really hope I'm wrong.
 

Bouillabaisse

LE
Book Reviewer
#7
Given the current state of MOD finances and army budgets you lot should be grateful that you got anything at all. 6 mill would do a reasonable accomodation refurb somewhere, for example. I glad to see someone took a long view on it
 
#8
Can I ask what the point of having a cadet target rifle is.

Do cadets (of any variety) need one rifle for target shooting and a standard rifle for exercises/ranges.

Seems a bit pointless.

Having said that I just realised that when I was an army cadet in the sixties we had .22 Martinis for the indoor range and .303s for exercises and ranges so maybe I have answered my own question.

Then in the late sixties the Army came and took away our .303s in case the woolyheads nicked them. And we got to use SLRs stored in the local TA drill hall. Frabjous day.
 

W21A

War Hero
Book Reviewer
#9
TS - L98A2, an L85A2 without the change lever, is the cadet full bore rifle also used for fieldcrraft blank firing exercises. The No8 and the L114A1 are .22 fifles for shooting on small bore ranges.

PS - you must have used the No8? A single shot Lee-enfield in .22.
 
Last edited:
#10
@Tedsson
My time 92 to 98(was on the books the exact allowed ages) the Cadet GP was for the cadet to be "soldier like" but not a soldier, child soldiers and all that law. At the time it was a single pull thing with a big f*ck off cocking handle. A2 update changed to semi auto only conversion.
Senior cadets played with the Bren until that was withdrawn(I had fun with one the last day before REME picked them up) then the cadets had full auto LSWs, exactly the same as the Regs/TAs. Due to the change senior cadets going straight to TA units just had to show they could use the SA80, I was such a cadet.
Thus a lot of training was gained, and avoided wastage later on for some TA units.

We also had access to the No8 rifle .22 for learning marksmanship principles. A bit ropey but could be used on indoor ranges to send lead down to the targets. A lot of huts built on mini ranges or as in one case an old Home Guard range! Cheap easy and safe way to teach weapons handling and target shooting.
There was also a conversion kit for the cadet GP to fire .22 on the indoor ranges. I think it converted the rifle to semi auto at the time.

Those that showed promise had access to the L81A1 to do "proper target shooting". I good carrot to dangle to get you shooting better. Within my county it was treated as target shooting, proper shooting jackets, the boxes for all our kit and no rank etc. It was in effect the ACF being a youth organisation as it based on. I attended Bisley several times, got to see Queens etc. It lifted my sights higher(pun intended) to what the Army could offer a snot kid from the Valleys. A more gentleman lifestyle should we say.

As an extra my cadet unit also had martni action .22 target rifles to practice on. Winter Friday nights in the Cadet centre/TAC then summer mini bus down to Seven tunnel ranges to fire the 7.62 target rifle. Great days .

I did not fire a shot after leaving the TA in 2002. Two years ago I had a shoot with a .22 target rifle, a few zeros and a banged out a 96 on the 5 bull target. I'm grateful to all the hard work the ACF put into my training via the range(pun again) of rifles. Made TA shooting a bit of p*ss.


Sorry waffled on but the ACF does have gains for youngsters wanting to go to the AR/REGS.
 
#11
@Tedsson
My time 92 to 98(was on the books the exact allowed ages) the Cadet GP was for the cadet to be "soldier like" but not a soldier, child soldiers and all that law. At the time it was a single pull thing with a big f*ck off cocking handle. A2 update changed to semi auto only conversion.
Senior cadets played with the Bren until that was withdrawn(I had fun with one the last day before REME picked them up) then the cadets had full auto LSWs, exactly the same as the Regs/TAs. Due to the change senior cadets going straight to TA units just had to show they could use the SA80, I was such a cadet.
Thus a lot of training was gained, and avoided wastage later on for some TA units.

We also had access to the No8 rifle .22 for learning marksmanship principles. A bit ropey but could be used on indoor ranges to send lead down to the targets. A lot of huts built on mini ranges or as in one case an old Home Guard range! Cheap easy and safe way to teach weapons handling and target shooting.
There was also a conversion kit for the cadet GP to fire .22 on the indoor ranges. I think it converted the rifle to semi auto at the time.

Those that showed promise had access to the L81A1 to do "proper target shooting". I good carrot to dangle to get you shooting better. Within my county it was treated as target shooting, proper shooting jackets, the boxes for all our kit and no rank etc. It was in effect the ACF being a youth organisation as it based on. I attended Bisley several times, got to see Queens etc. It lifted my sights higher(pun intended) to what the Army could offer a snot kid from the Valleys. A more gentleman lifestyle should we say.

As an extra my cadet unit also had martni action .22 target rifles to practice on. Winter Friday nights in the Cadet centre/TAC then summer mini bus down to Seven tunnel ranges to fire the 7.62 target rifle. Great days .

I did not fire a shot after leaving the TA in 2002. Two years ago I had a shoot with a .22 target rifle, a few zeros and a banged out a 96 on the 5 bull target. I'm grateful to all the hard work the ACF put into my training via the range(pun again) of rifles. Made TA shooting a bit of p*ss.


Sorry waffled on but the ACF does have gains for youngsters wanting to go to the AR/REGS.
Interesting point there.

I loved shooting as a cadet. As all the cadets in my battery had parents in the services, mostly Army, we got lots of opportunities.

Only ever fired .22. 303, SLR, 7.62 Bren and on two prized occasions a 25pdr. When I left in 1970 (having been vigorously advised that after failing half of my O Levels I ought to focus a bit more on my education- I did) I only ever fired a M-16, once, in Saudi Arabia and got a handful of shots in at invites to shooting clubs. Been shooting with shotguns quite a few times.

I can hear the shots at Longmoor Ranges most days and would love to have a bash on some modern weaponry.
 
#12
I remember using .22 version of THAT rifle.
 
#14
All they had to do was make some barrels and firing pins* for the No8s, and they'd have done another 50 years of flawless service.


*I doubt that most of the current surviving rifles even need a refurbishment. These things practically never wear out.
 
#15
All they had to do was make some barrels and firing pins* for the No8s, and they'd have done another 50 years of flawless service.


*I doubt that most of the current surviving rifles even need a refurbishment. These things practically never wear out.
No8 flip up volley sights. The proper target rifles had/have the proper target sights that you move click by sodding click.
No8 is good to practice marksman principles but no Cadet 100 winner.
 

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