Those In Peril Upon The Sea

Sentiment has a very big place in all of this, both professionally and for those of us who plonk about on the calmer and sunnier seas with a glass in hand. But safety first: I have my Navionics (updated by the nanosecond or whatever) on about three techno-telephone-things when we take a small trip, and also a set of the finest (£75, I think) local Charts under a glass cover on the big table for when all of that fails somehow (never has). I've never learned to use any sort of sextant or even astronomical chart, but fully understand the use of them in a situation where current - and quick'n'easy - technology fails. That's the sort of situation that Cap'n Bligh found himself in (he had a quadrant and a compass, but no charts or accurate timekeeper), and 4 and a bit thousand miles of traditional navigation later, he made a decent landfall. I bought a pair of nice brass compasses a couple of years ago, but they look too good to use.
 

skimmer

War Hero
Sentiment has a very big place in all of this, both professionally and for those of us who plonk about on the calmer and sunnier seas with a glass in hand. But safety first: I have my Navionics (updated by the nanosecond or whatever) on about three techno-telephone-things when we take a small trip, and also a set of the finest (£75, I think) local Charts under a glass cover on the big table for when all of that fails somehow (never has). I've never learned to use any sort of sextant or even astronomical chart, but fully understand the use of them in a situation where current - and quick'n'easy - technology fails. That's the sort of situation that Cap'n Bligh found himself in (he had a quadrant and a compass, but no charts or accurate timekeeper), and 4 and a bit thousand miles of traditional navigation later, he made a decent landfall. I bought a pair of nice brass compasses a couple of years ago, but they look too good to use.
Chart, compass, brass compass as above, Breton plotter, sharp pencil, chronometer good to go. Radio for Met if longer passage.
 
Chart, compass, brass compass as above, Breton plotter, sharp pencil, chronometer good to go. Radio for Met if longer passage.
Yep. And Navtex - obsolete too? (I liked having it, but never really took any notice of it.)
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
It appears then that once paper charts have been phased out about 120 of the current staff will be going with them.
Sod those okes, what'll happen to the hundreds of thousands of very wide but shallow drawers worldwide ?

It not as if they can be refilled with gentlemen's niche artistic magazines any more.
 
I once went to a talk given by the salvors, Smit, about the salvage operation. They said that during the operation the Russians were all over them, sticking their noses in and closely watching everything they did. Until they started lifting the boat when suddenly the Ruskies all found somewhere else they needed to be urgently and disappeared over the horizon.
 
Slightly off-topic - but I hope it will be of interest to seagoers;




SOURCE

What is in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch?​

In 2015, Science journal published a study that sought to discover where exactly all the trash from the GPGP originated. The discarded resources and other garbage were discovered to be flowing eastward out of Asia, the six primary sources being: Indonesia, China, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Thailand.

In addition to this, the Ocean Conservancy group reported that Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, China, and the Philippines dump more discarded plastic into the sea than all of the globe’s countries combined. China alone is responsible for 30% of worldwide plastic ocean pollution. In 2019, it was revealed that much of this ocean plastic came from Chinese cargo ships.

In 2018, it was found that at least 46% of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch is composed of discarded fishing nets and trawling gear.

More ammunition for my ire. No matter how Dolmio jars we recycle, no matter how many Teslas we drive, no matter how much we reduce CO² emissions, and no matter how many green bins we fill, the ****ing Chinks totally and utterly render everyone else's efforts totally and utterly pointless.
 

Diogenes' limp

War Hero
I once went to a talk given by the salvors, Smit, about the salvage operation. They said that during the operation the Russians were all over them, sticking their noses in and closely watching everything they did. Until they started lifting the boat when suddenly the Ruskies all found somewhere else they needed to be urgently and disappeared over the horizon.
Esoteric factoid, the chap who wore the 1st WW cap badge featured alongside managed all the Smit tugs operational finances when they were moved to the UK during WW2.

Not a lot of people know that.
 
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