Those In Peril Upon The Sea

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Slightly off-topic - but I hope it will be of interest to seagoers;




SOURCE

What is in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch?​

In 2015, Science journal published a study that sought to discover where exactly all the trash from the GPGP originated. The discarded resources and other garbage were discovered to be flowing eastward out of Asia, the six primary sources being: Indonesia, China, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Thailand.

In addition to this, the Ocean Conservancy group reported that Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, China, and the Philippines dump more discarded plastic into the sea than all of the globe’s countries combined. China alone is responsible for 30% of worldwide plastic ocean pollution. In 2019, it was revealed that much of this ocean plastic came from Chinese cargo ships.

In 2018, it was found that at least 46% of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch is composed of discarded fishing nets and trawling gear.
 
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Slightly off-topic - but I hope it will be of interest to seagoers;



Hats Off.
A million times more useful that the spouting of one GT.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Sadly, I doubt it - China did indeed sign up to the Paris Agreement on climate change, and appears to be taking the issue fairly seriously ......but I'm unsure whether any of the provisions cover the dumping of domestic waste at sea.


China

In its nationally determined contribution, China detailed four goals to achieve by 2030 (or earlier): (1) to reach peak CO2 emissions; (2) to reduce CO2 emissions per unit of GDP by 60 to 65 percent from the 2005 level; (3) to increase consumption of non-fossil fuels; and (4) to increase forest stock volume by 4.5 billion cubic meters over 2005 levels.[6]

Pledging to reach “peak” CO2 emissions by 2030 means that carbon dioxide emissions will not continue to rise, on net, after 2030. Chinese officials claim that the country has already lowered CO2 emissions per unit of GDP by 33.8 percent of 2005 levels; increased use of non-fossil fuels; increased forested areas compared to 2005 levels; and increased renewable energy capacity.[6]


Fact check/China, India, and the Paris Climate Agreement

Unforts, it appears China's commitment is more Coal-fired power station 'Smoke and Mirrors' than substance.


Los banditos Yanqis have little to crow about - Trump reneged on the deal signed by his predecessor.
 
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Not sure how, if at all, this will impact safety at sea but an interesting development for those of us who grew up using folios of paper charts and endlessly correcting them from notices to mariners:


The UK Hydrographic Office (UKHO) has announced its intention to develop options for the withdrawal from global paper chart production by late 2026 to increase focus on its digital navigation products and services.

Plans to withdraw the UKHO’s portfolio of Admiralty Standard Nautical Charts (SNCs) and Thematic Charts are in response to more marine, naval and leisure users primarily using digital products and services for navigation. The Admiralty Maritime Data Solutions digital navigation portfolio can be updated in near real-time, greatly enhancing safety of life at sea.

The phased withdrawal of paper charts from production will take place over a number of years and is anticipated to conclude in late 2026. In parallel, viable, official digital alternatives for sectors still using paper chart products will be developed. This will be a carefully managed process, conducted in close liaison with all customers and stakeholders, including the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) as well as other regulatory bodies, hydrographic offices, industry partners and distributors.

Peter Sparkes, chief executive of the UKHO, said: “The decision to commence the process of withdrawing from paper chart production will allow us to increase our focus on advanced digital services that meet the needs of today’s seafarers. As we look to the future, our core purpose remains the safety of shipping operations and delivering the best possible navigation solutions to achieve that. Whether for the Royal Navy, commercial vessels or other ocean users, our focus is on developing and delivering Admiralty digital services that promote safe, secure and thriving oceans.

“We understand the significance of this announcement, given the distinguished history of the UKHO’s paper chart production and the trust that mariners have placed in Admiralty charts over the generations. We will support users of SNCs during the withdrawal of our paper chart portfolio and work with our distributors to help users switch to digital alternatives between now and our planned date of 2026.”

The move to digital navigation solutions has been accompanied by a rapid decline in demand for paper charts, driven by the SOLAS-mandated transition to ECDIS and the wider benefits of digital solutions, including the next generation of navigation services, Peter Sparkes explained.

“Shipping is moving quickly towards a future underpinned by digital innovations, enhanced satellite connectivity at sea and optimised data solutions, supporting the next generation of navigation. The UKHO aims to be at the vanguard of this digital transition, continuing to provide the assured and globally trusted Admiralty navigation services that seafarers the world over depend on.”
 
Not sure how, if at all, this will impact safety at sea but an interesting development for those of us who grew up using folios of paper charts and endlessly correcting them from notices to mariners:


The UK Hydrographic Office (UKHO) has announced its intention to develop options for the withdrawal from global paper chart production by late 2026 to increase focus on its digital navigation products and services.

Plans to withdraw the UKHO’s portfolio of Admiralty Standard Nautical Charts (SNCs) and Thematic Charts are in response to more marine, naval and leisure users primarily using digital products and services for navigation. The Admiralty Maritime Data Solutions digital navigation portfolio can be updated in near real-time, greatly enhancing safety of life at sea.

The phased withdrawal of paper charts from production will take place over a number of years and is anticipated to conclude in late 2026. In parallel, viable, official digital alternatives for sectors still using paper chart products will be developed. This will be a carefully managed process, conducted in close liaison with all customers and stakeholders, including the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) as well as other regulatory bodies, hydrographic offices, industry partners and distributors.

Peter Sparkes, chief executive of the UKHO, said: “The decision to commence the process of withdrawing from paper chart production will allow us to increase our focus on advanced digital services that meet the needs of today’s seafarers. As we look to the future, our core purpose remains the safety of shipping operations and delivering the best possible navigation solutions to achieve that. Whether for the Royal Navy, commercial vessels or other ocean users, our focus is on developing and delivering Admiralty digital services that promote safe, secure and thriving oceans.

“We understand the significance of this announcement, given the distinguished history of the UKHO’s paper chart production and the trust that mariners have placed in Admiralty charts over the generations. We will support users of SNCs during the withdrawal of our paper chart portfolio and work with our distributors to help users switch to digital alternatives between now and our planned date of 2026.”

The move to digital navigation solutions has been accompanied by a rapid decline in demand for paper charts, driven by the SOLAS-mandated transition to ECDIS and the wider benefits of digital solutions, including the next generation of navigation services, Peter Sparkes explained.

“Shipping is moving quickly towards a future underpinned by digital innovations, enhanced satellite connectivity at sea and optimised data solutions, supporting the next generation of navigation. The UKHO aims to be at the vanguard of this digital transition, continuing to provide the assured and globally trusted Admiralty navigation services that seafarers the world over depend on.”
Not a good move in my humble opinion.
 
“Shipping is moving quickly towards a future underpinned by digital innovations, enhanced satellite connectivity at sea and optimised data solutions, supporting the next generation of navigation.
So what if, some one hacks into the systems and changes things. I know that charts can be expensive, but dammit so too could the loss of a ship.
 
I tend to agree, but if no one is using them and the service is running at a loss, why should we continue to subsidise it?
Well the railways run at a loss, we still attempt to run them. The NHS runs at a loss, we still have it. Isn't the point more that should there be power loss and the systems can't work.
 

philc

LE
Well the railways run at a loss, we still attempt to run them. The NHS runs at a loss, we still have it. Isn't the point more that should there be power loss and the systems can't work.

The railways and NHS are services for the UK, the provision of nautical charts is a service to the international shipping community, as such, if the international shipping community wants to continue using paper charts then perhaps a system needs to be put in place whereby the shipping community pays for it rather than the UK taxpayer, if indeed that is what is happening at present.
 
The railways and NHS are services for the UK, the provision of nautical charts is a service to the international shipping community, as such, if the international shipping community wants to continue using paper charts then perhaps a system needs to be put in place whereby the shipping community pays for it rather than the UK taxpayer, if indeed that is what is happening at present.
I was under the impression that they did, via HMSO. It's also the reason they have to pay for safety exams on ships cos I had to examine certs when taking lights. Are some charts not also supplied with then vessel when transferred to the owner.
 
I was under the impression that they did, via HMSO. It's also the reason they have to pay for safety exams on ships cos I had to examine certs when taking lights. Are some charts not also supplied with then vessel when transferred to the owner.

I am sure you are correct, charts are expensive, £25-£30 each last time I bought one which will be about 5 years ago now. If a ship needs to purchase a hundred or more it soon mounts up. Also they need regularly updating and replacing with new editions, which is a pain in the arrse and time consuming. As regards charts being supplied when a vessel is transferred to the owner; if you mean when a new ship is handed over by the builders yard it is unlikely, in my experience, that the yard will supply chart folios, they will need to be purchased by the owners for the forthcoming voyage. All expensive for the owner and if they can save a few bob by shifting to electronic charts they will almost certainly do so. If that means producing paper charts becomes uneconomical then UKHO will either need to find other sources of funding or drop the service.

According to the MoD:

UKHO is an executive agency and trading fund of the MOD. UKHO’s activities are funded entirely from sales of hydrographic products and services to defence and commercial customers through an international network of distributors. It currently employs approximately 900 staff at its offices in Taunton1 . It has more than 225 years of experience in producing marine navigational and other hydrographic products in paper and now predominantly digital formats for customers.


The note regarding the number of employees at UKHO says:

1 Increasing to c950 in the short term under Corporate Plan 2021-26, before reducing to c780 post transformation in 2026.

It appears then that once paper charts have been phased out about 120 of the current staff will be going with them.
 
I am sure you are correct, charts are expensive, £25-£30 each last time I bought one which will be about 5 years ago now. If a ship needs to purchase a hundred or more it soon mounts up. Also they need regularly updating and replacing with new editions, which is a pain in the arrse and time consuming. As regards charts being supplied when a vessel is transferred to the owner; if you mean when a new ship is handed over by the builders yard it is unlikely, in my experience, that the yard will supply chart folios, they will need to be purchased by the owners for the forthcoming voyage. All expensive for the owner and if they can save a few bob by shifting to electronic charts they will almost certainly do so. If that means producing paper charts becomes uneconomical then UKHO will either need to find other sources of funding or drop the service.

According to the MoD:

UKHO is an executive agency and trading fund of the MOD. UKHO’s activities are funded entirely from sales of hydrographic products and services to defence and commercial customers through an international network of distributors. It currently employs approximately 900 staff at its offices in Taunton1 . It has more than 225 years of experience in producing marine navigational and other hydrographic products in paper and now predominantly digital formats for customers.


The note regarding the number of employees at UKHO says:

1 Increasing to c950 in the short term under Corporate Plan 2021-26, before reducing to c780 post transformation in 2026.

It appears then that once paper charts have been phased out about 120 of the current staff will be going with them.

And there’s your real reason. Part of the 90,000 CS that Boris said have to go (for the tax cuts in time for the next GE).
 

endure

GCM
I am sure you are correct, charts are expensive, £25-£30 each last time I bought one which will be about 5 years ago now. If a ship needs to purchase a hundred or more it soon mounts up. Also they need regularly updating and replacing with new editions, which is a pain in the arrse and time consuming. As regards charts being supplied when a vessel is transferred to the owner; if you mean when a new ship is handed over by the builders yard it is unlikely, in my experience, that the yard will supply chart folios, they will need to be purchased by the owners for the forthcoming voyage. All expensive for the owner and if they can save a few bob by shifting to electronic charts they will almost certainly do so. If that means producing paper charts becomes uneconomical then UKHO will either need to find other sources of funding or drop the service.

According to the MoD:

UKHO is an executive agency and trading fund of the MOD. UKHO’s activities are funded entirely from sales of hydrographic products and services to defence and commercial customers through an international network of distributors. It currently employs approximately 900 staff at its offices in Taunton1 . It has more than 225 years of experience in producing marine navigational and other hydrographic products in paper and now predominantly digital formats for customers.


The note regarding the number of employees at UKHO says:

1 Increasing to c950 in the short term under Corporate Plan 2021-26, before reducing to c780 post transformation in 2026.

It appears then that once paper charts have been phased out about 120 of the current staff will be going with them.
One thing that always puzzled me was why UKHO used to produce Volume 1 of the Admiralty List of Radio Signals.

Two chunky books that must have cost a lot to produce and keep updated that consisted solely of the details of commercial coast radio stations round the world.

Presumably they made a profit out of producing them.
 
Having gone around the world, and then around the North Atlantic and Arctic, solely on electronic charts, all I’ll say is, finally.

Paper charts are brilliant for some things (wrapping paper?) but electronic charts are far superior.
 
Having gone around the world, and then around the North Atlantic and Arctic, solely on electronic charts, all I’ll say is, finally.

Paper charts are brilliant for some things (wrapping paper?) but electronic charts are far superior.

I agree that electronic charts are very good but with the caveat, if used properly. I have seen occasions where all the electronic equipment is provided; ECDIS, AIS, GPS etc. and all the data is input onto the ECDIS so the OOW can look at his chart display and see where he is and the positions of all the ships around him. He then treats the whole thing much like a computer game and doesn't do the basics and look out of the window. All this kit should be seen a an aid to navigation not the standard.

Or maybe I'm just an old fart!
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
electronics fail usually at a critical moment
There is no earthly reason for electronic failure to be any worse or more insurmountable than, e.g. losing, burning, soaking or otherwise destroying paper charts. Backups, reversionary modes, alternate power, are all measures to prevent it. Ditto "hacking the database and changing things". Nobody got hysterical about a burglar getting in and resetting the print presses or burning down the paper stores, but for some reason "hacking" is presumed to be uniquely powerful and dangerous (it's not).

Moreover electronic forms of information usually come with huge advantages, such as (most of the time) real-time updates, automation, and so on. Of course they can be misused, but so can any other form of aid.

So, yes, some of these are objections are just the smell of old farts.
 

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