Those In Peril Upon The Sea

I am not a chemist but my first thought was Bromine, not Chlorine. I seem to recall from school that it was brown but that was in a stable state rather than rapid decompression.

A quick google shows Bromine gas and some gas incidents with very similar colours.

I've only seen small amounts of Chlorine, ISTR that was more yellow/green.
 
Chlorine gas in liquified form. Very nasty

Don't think it is Bromine, fumes but it's not that volatile with a boiling point around 59C whilst liquid Chlorine boils around -37C


That was an excellent demonstration of sudden release of liquid Chlorine. Anyway I'll add this just for interest.

 
Regardless - pretty fûcking minging to be caught up in
 
gCaptain says at least 10 dead:

Useful info, thanks.

1656361884034.png
 
Any professional opinions on this evening's incident?


Not a professional opinion but..

1) Probably chlorine for water treatment. (Would liquid Bromine even be moved in that quantity?)
2) Something gives way catastrophically in the lifting gear.
3) Deaths are likely biased to those on deck and low down on the ship.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Mask in 9 was the old mantra.
Not a chance.
 
There are a number of ways of lifting a container. The usual way in a dedicated container terminal would be to have a container gantry crane with a container lifting spreader operated hydraulically, or perhaps electrically, from the crane cab.
gantry.jpg


This is not a dedicated container terminal and the crane is not a specialist gantry crane but a fairly standard dockside crane. With this type of crane the load needs to be spread across the top of the container and into the hook. There are various ways of doing this, the best is to use a frame spreader, attached to the container with twistlocks, with 4 wires running from each corner of the container to a steel ring over the crane hook.

CLF1250_Container_Lifting_Frame.jpg



Alternatively, 4 wires / chains attached to the container with hooks leading to a central ring over the crane hook.


1656403543379.png


It is not clear from the video which method was used here but if the hooks were connected to the top of the container it would require men to climb up onto the top of the unit to connect them, I do not see that in the video but that's not to say it didn't happen. The film is not that clear. Either way it looks, again with the caveat that the video is not clear, that the failure was at the hook, there does not appear to be any wires left hanging or container spreader left hanging from the hook once the container is dropped. This may then mean that the ring was not placed over the hook correctly or all 4 wires failed at the same time, which seems unlikely. All speculation based on a poor quality video and therefore probably all wrong.
 
From memory most of the shipping tankers I came across were contained within container frames for stacking within stacks. On Ro Ro they were on flats to be driven on board but were segregated into certain areas, so it definitely looks like mishandling by the PA.
 
From memory most of the shipping tankers I came across were contained within container frames for stacking within stacks. On Ro Ro they were on flats to be driven on board but were segregated into certain areas, so it definitely looks like mishandling by the PA.

Tank containers are generally made up of a frame the same dimensions as a standard 20 or 40 foot shipping container open at the top, bottom and sides with a cylindrical tank fitted inside the framework to carry a liquid or gas cargo. When loaded onto a standard container ship they would fit within the cell guides as would a normal container. Forest 6 is not a standard container ship, it is described as a "deck cargo ship", a term I am not particularly familiar with but which seems to be of a design developed from an offshore supply vessel and used for carrying specialist deck or heavy cargoes, I assume the deck is reenforced and able to take a high point loading. Either way given the tank container never actually made it onto the vessel the type of vessel it was being loaded onto seems immaterial. I agree though, from the footage, it does appear the port authority and/or the stevedore company have questions to answer.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Tank containers are generally made up of a frame the same dimensions as a standard 20 or 40 foot shipping container open at the top, bottom and sides with a cylindrical tank fitted inside the framework to carry a liquid or gas cargo. When loaded onto a standard container ship they would fit within the cell guides as would a normal container. Forest 6 is not a standard container ship, it is described as a "deck cargo ship", a term I am not particularly familiar with but which seems to be of a design developed from an offshore supply vessel and used for carrying specialist deck or heavy cargoes, I assume the deck is reenforced and able to take a high point loading. Either way given the tank container never actually made it onto the vessel the type of vessel it was being loaded onto seems immaterial. I agree though, from the footage, it does appear the port authority and/or the stevedore company have questions to answer.
The stevedore won't be able to say much now! :(
 
Tank containers are generally made up of a frame the same dimensions as a standard 20 or 40 foot shipping container open at the top, bottom and sides with a cylindrical tank fitted inside the framework to carry a liquid or gas cargo. When loaded onto a standard container ship they would fit within the cell guides as would a normal container. Forest 6 is not a standard container ship, it is described as a "deck cargo ship", a term I am not particularly familiar with but which seems to be of a design developed from an offshore supply vessel and used for carrying specialist deck or heavy cargoes, I assume the deck is reenforced and able to take a high point loading. Either way given the tank container never actually made it onto the vessel the type of vessel it was being loaded onto seems immaterial. I agree though, from the footage, it does appear the port authority and/or the stevedore company have questions to answer.
Completely agree, one of the fundamentals I learned,, in my own area of customs clearance, was that the cargo is kept ideally as stable as possible in all stages of handling, which was why the Dock authority presented goods for examination. Or supplied access. If you look at the vessel, it appears to be fitted with trestles fitting to be able to accept the standard container fittings, so I would have expected standard gantries fitted for containers. Aquaba is an old port, but it doesn’t preclude modern freight handling systems. I have to say some of the trailers don’t inspire confidence.
 

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
I worked for a major chlorine & bromine manufacturer for 10 years.

Chlorine is very nasty in all forms.
  • It boils at -34°C, which means that it can literally freeze the balls off anything it touches.
  • At 20°C it has a pressure of ~6 bar.
  • It's a very strong oxidizing agent - things will burn in it rapidly. Really, really bad in contact with aluminium, magnesium etc.
  • It's heavier than air and so collects in pits and trenches
  • >5 ppm will cause irritation to windpipe and lungs
  • 30-50ppm will cause severe pulmonary oedema (lungs will fill with mucous)
  • 400ppm will kill you in 30 minutes
  • >1000ppm will kill in 2-3 minutes
My very late grandfather was gassed with Chlorine at Ypres. His lungs were badly damaged and he died at age 38 from lung issues.

It's not a good way to go.
 

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