Those In Peril Upon The Sea

@merchantman, on that ship, City of Dundee, are the masts crane mounts or part of a radio aerial set up? How many holds? Did it have a refrigerated hold? Were the crew housed in the centre section under the bridge?
 
To be fair Modern "None flag of convenience" Merchant ships seem to have pretty good amenities on board these days.

Good amenities yes but with the minimum crew and dry ships there is very little social life on board. I sailed on a modern ro ro a few years ago, just a short trip from Liverpool to Antwerp. They had a fantastic large lounge but no body in it. They all had tv's in their cabins and all sat in their own rooms watching separate televisions. It was a bit strange
 
Good amenities yes but with the minimum crew and dry ships there is very little social life on board. I sailed on a modern ro ro a few years ago, just a short trip from Liverpool to Antwerp. They had a fantastic large lounge but no body in it. They all had tv's in their cabins and all sat in their own rooms watching separate televisions. It was a bit strange
To be fair its getting this way with us. I believe its slowly heading that way with the RN as well! I think its just how modern society is going.
 
@merchantman, on that ship, City of Dundee, are the masts crane mounts or part of a radio aerial set up? How many holds? Did it have a refrigerated hold? Were the crew housed in the centre section under the bridge?
The Dundee had 4 cargo holds, all general, no reefer. Holds 1, 3 and 4 had steel MacGregor covers but for some reason No 2 had wood and canvas. She carried British officers and Indian crew. The British offers lived midships and the Indian crew aft. There were no cranes on board the masts supported derricks which were used in union purchase when required to work cargo. The big structure sticking up at the foremast with a canvas cover over it is a heavy lift derrick which was a pain in the arrse to rig and took 6 men to operate; it wasn't used often! The line between the masts is the triatic stay with the radio aerials held up from it. I'm sure @endure will be able to explain that better than me.
 
To be fair its getting this way with us. I believe its slowly heading that way with the RN as well! I think its just how modern society is going.
Thank God I don't have to do it any more. In my day there was a bar and lots of beer on most ships, or cabin drinking if no bar. There was always someone around to have a beer with at most times of the day or night. Then in port and charging up the road with your dick in one hand and a quid in the other.
 

endure

GCM
The Dundee had 4 cargo holds, all general, no reefer. Holds 1, 3 and 4 had steel MacGregor covers but for some reason No 2 had wood and canvas. She carried British officers and Indian crew. The British offers lived midships and the Indian crew aft. There were no cranes on board the masts supported derricks which were used in union purchase when required to work cargo. The big structure sticking up at the foremast with a canvas cover over it is a heavy lift derrick which was a pain in the arrse to rig and took 6 men to operate; it wasn't used often! The line between the masts is the triatic stay with the radio aerials held up from it. I'm sure @endure will be able to explain that better than me.
I never sailed with aerials that ran forward of the bridge. They were all either verticals or inverted Ls that ran aft but I never sailed on dry cargo ships anyway.

SHP_SAN_778_Opal Bounty 05-09-82 resize.jpg
 

philc

LE
To be fair its getting this way with us. I believe its slowly heading that way with the RN as well! I think its just how modern society is going.

Chatting to a Submariner over Xmas and I asked him about the recent death of JR up there in Faslane. He reckoned suicide, seems the JRs off patrol have single cabins, 4 bars to choose and can get carry outs to their rooms. So they sit in the room, bored, pissed and stuck in the middle of no where. Not healthy.

He said all shore bases have single rooms for JRs now, whilst in my shoretime some of room mates were not ideal, least it was someone to chat with when stuck in Nelson or Drake.
 
Long gone are the days of being in mess decks and checking on those who you live with. It used to be that you would drag your mate out rather than leaving him alone to fester alone but now that doesn't happen. People are then left alone and not seen or missed until they don't turn up for work and by then it can be too late.

There were good and bad points with the old system but you always had someone looking out for you.
 
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