Those In Peril Upon The Sea

I am not sure where you are coming from, I didn't suggest they should drop anything other than boulders, I am merely questioning the suggestion that such boulders on the seabed poses any hazard to shipping.
Don't they ever think of the poor fish they kill when a bloody great rock drops onto their bonce?
Heartless bastards.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Looking at the videos it seems the boulders being dropped are about one metre in height, what possible threat, among all the other detritus both natural and man made that litters the sea bed, could such boulders pose to shipping?

I know all our hearts swell with pride when we see our Great British fishing fleet and we all hate the Greenies, because well they're Greenies basically, but I happen to think the boulder droppers are on the right side of this argument. If the only way you can make a quick buck is by turning the sea bed into a lifeless, watery Sahara then get a different job.


If unscrupulous thieves decide they can get away with raping sea life nurseries, well they get what they deserve.

I' ve dived no- fish sanctuaries like L'estartit and St Abbs, and it's wonderful to see what the sea bed should look like without trawling.
 
From Lloyd's List

Drill ship UMW Naga 7: According to reports, earlier the drill ship was punched through and tilted around 10 degrees to portside, on a water depth of 92 meters off Sarawak in the Salam 3 block, and subsequently sunk, at around 1445 hrs, May 3. The 101 workers on board abandoned the drill ship and deployed three lifeboats. All personnel who were accounted for are safe. Ninety-three castaways were accommodated aboard Perdana Marathon and eight aboard Armada Tuah 305. The majority have since been transferred to Miri, Sarawak. The vessel was standing by at the incident location awaiting further instruction from the charterer CONOCO.
Drill ship UMW Naga 7 (10201 gt, built 2015), reportedly sunk off Bintulu, in position lat 04 41 47N, long 111 41 16E, on May 3. The crew members, most of them Sarawakians, were transported to the Offshore Transit Centre for a mandatory quarantine per standard operating procedures upon their arrival at Miri Port. The costs will be borne by the Conoco company. -- Correspondent.

Drill ship UMW Naga 7 (10201 gt, built 2015), reportedly sunk off Bintulu, in position lat 04 41 47N, long 111 41 16E, on May 3. The crew members, most of them Sarawakians, were transported to the Offshore Transit Centre for a mandatory quarantine per standard operating procedures upon their arrival at Miri Port. The costs will be borne by the Conoco company. -- Correspondent.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Two airliners, a u-boat and an oil rig gone tits up.

You'd want to avoid anything Malaysian owned.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Those in peril on the sea may be in a little more peril in the future. It seems the Council of Lloyd's are thinking of scrapping the Lloyd's Salvage Arbitration Branch (LSAB). The LSAB does all the admin for Lloyd's Open Form Salvage Agreement. The Council have now decided that this no longer forms part of their core business.

LOF is the internationally accepted salvage contract which has been in use since the turn of the 20th century. There are other salvage forms available, Japan, Turkish and one or two others but LOF is the one used most. It allows for salvage terms to be agreed without the need to discuss costs and/ or remuneration. The salvors can simply get on with the job quickly in what is often an emergency situation and the remuneration can be discussed afterwards or arbitrated in London if an amicable agreement cannot be reached. If the LSAB is lost there would be no one to administer the system and it could very easily fall into disuse.

The article in Lloyd's List is behind a paywall, copied below.

LLOYD’S HAS PLUNGED the survival of Lloyd’s Open Form into fresh
doubt after floating a proposal to shut down the Lloyd’s Salvage
Arbitration Branch.
The branch provides the support framework for LOF, using a panel of
London maritime arbitrators and carrying out a range of other tasks
including collection of security for salvage operations undertaken by it.
The move comes against a background of reduced usage of the world’s
oldest and most trusted emergency salvage contract, fuelled by
continuing aversion to it from various quarters of the insurance
industry that deem it to be too costly.
A recent Lloyd’s internal review has identified the branch, which is part
of Lloyd’s Agency department, as “no longer considered core” to its
business.
In an April 23 message to the members of the Lloyd’s Salvage Group
representing various stakeholders, Lloyd’s said it was considering
whether to stop the service and put it in run-off later this year.
However, recipients — including members of the Scopic Committee
— have been given the chance to submit feedback on the proposed
closure.
Some recipients were said to be “in shock” after learning of the
proposal.
Martin Hall, head of marine casualty for law firm Clyde & Co. and
secretary of the Admiralty Solicitors’ Group (ASG), which is
represented on the Lloyd’s Salvage Group, said that
there would be a strong reaction, although Lloyd’s
“did not leave very much time for comment”.
The ASG is expected to be among several bodies
making presentations to Lloyd’s next week before
the May 7 deadline for feedback.
“It raises many questions,” he said when contacted
for comment. “There is the administration side that
the SAB does and conceivably you might be able to
find someone else to take on some of those tasks.
“But then it is also a brand and it is questionable that
Lloyd’s would want the reputational risk of allowing
another party to administer LOF.
“So, it does bring into question whether LOF can
continue if the branch is closed. It could be a final
nail in the coffin of LOF,” Mr Hall said.
“The LOF system has developed over more than a
century and so it is not only the administration of
the system that will provide difficulties but you have
the expertise of the arbitrators and the trust in the
system that will be very difficult, if not impossible,
to replace.”
The International Salvage Union verified it was
among those approached for feedback on the future
of the branch.
“ISU promotes the use of the Lloyd’s Open Form and
values the benefits it offers to shipowners, insurers
and salvors. We are currently considering our
response to the consultation,” said the ISU’s
secretary-general, Roger Evans.
Salvage sources left little doubt that the sector had
been rocked by the development.
“This move has come as a shock to everyone in the
marine sector,” said one who was approached by
Lloyd’s List for comment.
LOF usage has been crumbling in recent years, with
ISU members handling just 34 cases last year, down
one from 2019 and down from 55 in 2018. The
aggregate number of services rendered under all
types of contract has also been reducing annually,
though.
Meanwhile, according to the Lloyd’s website, total
salvage awards paid out under the system hit a
historic low of just $3.5m in 2018, the last year for
which data was included.
Lloyd’s List has been told that some feedback being
readied for next week will warn of widespread harm
if Lloyd’s dumps LOF.
“We are talking about a contract that has been
instrumental in maritime safety,” said one group
member.
“It may lead to more casualties and then there will
be a knock-on effect on the reputation of the Lloyd’s
market, not to mention London’s credentials as a
maritime and legal centre,” he said.
 

Cane Mala

Swinger
Whoops wouldn’t want to be the person who signed off on the site survey.....
@NSP hmmmm seems to have been that well known bunch of Dutch cowboys FUGRO.
I worked with a firm called FUGRO on an airport project some years ago (runway assessment and design). I wonder if they are the same crowd. Are they known as a bit slap-dash in your world because in mine they were an expensive ornament who managed to appear busy, make no decisions and pass all the risk down the supply chain
 

Rab_C

LE
I worked with a firm called FUGRO on an airport project some years ago (runway assessment and design). I wonder if they are the same crowd. Are they known as a bit slap-dash in your world because in mine they were an expensive ornament who managed to appear busy, make no decisions and pass all the risk down the supply chain
They are one of the larger players in the offshore survey industry. Their quality does seem to depend on which office is running the job. As a client for their services I find them frustrating to deal with as they seem to think that they know best.
 
Those in peril on the sea may be in a little more peril in the future. It seems the Council of Lloyd's are thinking of scrapping the Lloyd's Salvage Arbitration Branch (LSAB). The LSAB does all the admin for Lloyd's Open Form Salvage Agreement. The Council have now decided that this no longer forms part of their core business.....

....fuelled by continuing aversion to it from various quarters of the insurance
industry that deem it to be too costly.

That stood out as one of those comments that can bite you on the arse - after you've tried the alternatives
 
Those in peril on the sea may be in a little more peril in the future. It seems the Council of Lloyd's are thinking of scrapping the Lloyd's Salvage Arbitration Branch (LSAB). The LSAB does all the admin for Lloyd's Open Form Salvage Agreement. The Council have now decided that this no longer forms part of their core business.

LOF is the internationally accepted salvage contract which has been in use since the turn of the 20th century. There are other salvage forms available, Japan, Turkish and one or two others but LOF is the one used most. It allows for salvage terms to be agreed without the need to discuss costs and/ or remuneration. The salvors can simply get on with the job quickly in what is often an emergency situation and the remuneration can be discussed afterwards or arbitrated in London if an amicable agreement cannot be reached. If the LSAB is lost there would be no one to administer the system and it could very easily fall into disuse.

The article in Lloyd's List is behind a paywall, copied below.

CUT

It seems Lloyd's have seen sense and backed down. They will continue to operate the Lloyd’s Salvage Arbitration Branch (LSAB) and Lloyd’s Open Form (LOF) but at an amended charging structure for use of Lloyd’s Open Form.

Nice of them.
 

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