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Those In Peril Upon The Sea

Yokel

LE
An underwater look (UW) is both incredibly interesting and incredibly bum clenching!

Assuming a twin screw ship, the boat has to approach from the stern (rear - stop sniggering at the bank) slightly faster than the ship. The boat is at periscope depth (PD) so the top of the fin is only a few feet below the surface. As the boat gets closer, the twin vortexes from the ship's screws cause interesting effects, which the skipper has to control. When the boat is very close to the stern of the ship the periscope is lowered then, as the boat passes the swirling vortex, it goes 'quiet'.

At this point 'knowing/guesstimating' the draft of the ship, the periscope is slowly raised - looking upward. It is now that we know if the team have done a good drill, as the twin screws, or at least one of them, can be seen. The number of blades can be counted, type of propeller etc, and, as the boat moves forward underneath the ship, any 'interesting' holes or protuberances can be viewed. During this evolution, which takes as long as it takes, the ship and the boat are literally only feet from each other - and only one knows what is going on!

All of this is filmed for future analysis. At the time, if you are on watch in the Control Room, you can watch the action on several live TV monitors....... and hear/feel the prop wash!

When the job is done, the boat just gently goes deeper, then tea and muffins all round!

Practice makes perfect!

This is the story of a real Cold War one - HMS Swiftsure taking a peek at the Soviet carrier (and cruise missile platform) Kiev.


Is practising underwater look operations against ferries really so risky for the target vessel?

I once suggested (on here) that some sort of robotic vehicle could be used for underwater look jobs - but that would be a challenging specification.
 
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NSP

LE
The way container ships are run these days it is difficult for the captain and crew to keep up with loading and discharge operations. They arrive in port and someone from the terminal will come aboard with a loading plan for the ship and the crew will have very little say in what goes where. The cargo lashing is also likely to be done by shore gangs but the ship's officers should check the lashings before the ship sails.

The latest info is:

A press report, dated Jan 20, states: Heavy weather in the North Pacific is being blamed for the loss of containers aboard fully cellular containership Maersk Essenon Jan 16. “We view this as a very serious situation which will be investigated promptly and thoroughly,” Maersk said in its statement. They reported that all the crew was safe and that a detailed cargo assessment is ongoing. In addition, the US Coast Guard, flag state and relevant authorities have been notified.

There will no doubt be questions asked but that's why you have insurance
Do they tie them down on these big purpose-built container ships? I get the impression that they just stack them up like bricks and don't even engage the ISO locks (how could they at the top of a stack, well beyond reach?). They seem to rely on the mass of the stack and the bolts on the locks sitting in the recess of the box below to stop them going overboard.
 

NSP

LE
I once suggested (on here) that some sort of robotic vehicle could be used for underwater look jobs - but that would be a challenging specification.
Indeed. At best one of our big workclass 150HP ROVs can manage 3-4kts. Then there's the umbilical - not a good thing to pass near the target vessel's props.

Perhaps the biggest kicker, though, is remote underwater vehicles (the big ones; the eyeball ones have - obviously - much smaller, faster fans on them) are driven by very rapidly spinning 30cm diameter thrusters. Probably not the cleverest idea to chase a naval vessel with something propelled by a high-speed screw that makes a very loud, distinctive whine at full chat...
 
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The way container ships are run these days it is difficult for the captain and crew to keep up with loading and discharge operations. They arrive in port and someone from the terminal will come aboard with a loading plan for the ship and the crew will have very little say in what goes where. The cargo lashing is also likely to be done by shore gangs but the ship's officers should check the lashings before the ship sails.

The latest info is:

A press report, dated Jan 20, states: Heavy weather in the North Pacific is being blamed for the loss of containers aboard fully cellular containership Maersk Essenon Jan 16. “We view this as a very serious situation which will be investigated promptly and thoroughly,” Maersk said in its statement. They reported that all the crew was safe and that a detailed cargo assessment is ongoing. In addition, the US Coast Guard, flag state and relevant authorities have been notified.

There will no doubt be questions asked but that's why you have insurance
That doesn’t surprise me. Going back to the early nineties posted at Grain, I had occasion to visit Evergreen and watched the plotting of the loading plan. The whole thing was sequenced even then. Since weights were on the export declarations c88 or SADS they basically took over the load distribution. After all these years It’s not clear if SAD is still used.
 

endure

GCM
Do they tie them down on these big purpose-built container ships? I get the impression that they just stack them up like bricks and don't even engage the ISO locks (how could they at the top of a stack, well beyond reach?). They seem to rely on the mass of the stack and the bolts on the locks sitting in the recess of the box below to stop them going overboard.

They're lashed down.
container-ship-operations.jpg
 

NSP

LE
'Kin 'ell - the paperwork and PPE we'd need before we started scrambling about on that lot in my line! Interesting that they don't lash the stacks together - I'd have thought that would help keep the outer columns inboard if there was a bit of a roll on. Or is the thinking that if the outer stacks go then they don't take the inboard ones with them...?
 

NSP

LE
Whilst we're talking about containers and safety...

Balikpapan03.jpg


Only two strops, too.

Seen in Balikpapan, Indonesian Borneo, 2007.
 

endure

GCM
'Kin 'ell - the paperwork and PPE we'd need before we started scrambling about on that lot in my line! Interesting that they don't lash the stacks together - I'd have thought that would help keep the outer columns inboard if there was a bit of a roll on. Or is the thinking that if the outer stacks go then they don't take the inboard ones with them...?
Paperwork? :rofl:
 

NSP

LE
Paperwork? :rofl:
Yep - we still have to go to the bridge and fill out a carbonless triplicate pad for a permit. White (top) copy on bridge PTW board, yellow copy on deck PTW board, pink copy in job doer/deck supervisors overalls chest pocket, to be returned to bridge at completion of job/expiry of permit [end of shift] as per whichever comes first.
 

endure

GCM
"Containerships can be subject to pitching and rolling violently, as well as a phenomenon known as parametric rolling, which can see the ship roll 30-40 degrees, or more. Such powerful forces can easily snap lashings and locks of a 10-high container stack, resulting in losses into the sea and damage to remaining boxes."

 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Containers should be fixed to the ones above and below within a stack with twist-locks, the top tier can also be fixed to adjacent containers with bridging bars (when possible). The lower tiers can be lashed to the deck with lashing rods as in the photo posted above by @endure, the problem with the lashing rods is that they can only be used on the lower 3 tiers, a modern large ship may stack them 5 or 6 high on deck therefore they should all be fixed together in a single block as much as is practicable.

When the ship is at sea and the weather gets a bit bumpy significant dynamic stresses come onto the lashings. The ship will not only roll and pitch but there can be a large vertical movement (heave) which puts a lot of stress on the lower tiers and can cause the boxes collapse loosening and damaging the lashings leading to a loss of containers. This is not helped in that container weights are sometimes under-declared which can mean that a container is placed on the top of a stack when, had the true weight been known it would have been stowed elsewhere, this will impact on the ships stability.

A containers contents can also be misdeclared and a dangerous cargo not included on the IMDG (dangerous cargo) list leading it to be stowed in an inappropriate position. This tended to happen with Calcium Hyperchlorite which in itself is quite benign but if it overheats it can catch fire and explode. It should therefore be stowed on deck. However an IMDG cargo will probably attract a premium on the freight and so is often included in the manifest as something else. This has lead to a number of incidents over the years .
 
Sixpence Half Crown moment on the Palau flagged ship Arvin from my Linkedin feed


A Palau-flagged dry cargo ship sank off Turkey's Black Sea on Jan. 17, according to a Turkish governor.

The ship, named Arvin, sank off the Inkumu Coast of the northern Bartın province, said Sinan Güner.

According to the Turkish Transport and Infrastructure Ministry, rescue teams have so far managed to rescue six of 12 crew members – all Ukrainian nationals – and recover the lifeless bodies of two others.

The ship, which was anchored within the administrative boundaries of the Bartın Port Authority on Friday due to bad weather conditions, broke and sank on Jan. 17, the ministry said.

The ministry added that rescue efforts are underway to rescue the remainder of the crew.

In a statement, the Turkish National Defense Ministry announced that the country’s navy deployed a frigate to support the rescue effort.

 
Sixpence Half Crown moment on the Palau flagged ship Arvin from my Linkedin feed


A Palau-flagged dry cargo ship sank off Turkey's Black Sea on Jan. 17, according to a Turkish governor.

The ship, named Arvin, sank off the Inkumu Coast of the northern Bartın province, said Sinan Güner.

According to the Turkish Transport and Infrastructure Ministry, rescue teams have so far managed to rescue six of 12 crew members – all Ukrainian nationals – and recover the lifeless bodies of two others.

The ship, which was anchored within the administrative boundaries of the Bartın Port Authority on Friday due to bad weather conditions, broke and sank on Jan. 17, the ministry said.

The ministry added that rescue efforts are underway to rescue the remainder of the crew.

In a statement, the Turkish National Defense Ministry announced that the country’s navy deployed a frigate to support the rescue effort.

A great deal of (understandable) panic there, but also a fair bit of undisciplined reporting - hard to understand the exchanges, and there are one or two relatively level voices speaking. Shame about those who didn't make it. Questions about the construction of a ship which can do that in those conditions (even fully loaded) should be asked, I'd say.
ARVIN.jpg
 

endure

GCM
Sixpence Half Crown moment on the Palau flagged ship Arvin from my Linkedin feed


A Palau-flagged dry cargo ship sank off Turkey's Black Sea on Jan. 17, according to a Turkish governor.

The ship, named Arvin, sank off the Inkumu Coast of the northern Bartın province, said Sinan Güner.

According to the Turkish Transport and Infrastructure Ministry, rescue teams have so far managed to rescue six of 12 crew members – all Ukrainian nationals – and recover the lifeless bodies of two others.

The ship, which was anchored within the administrative boundaries of the Bartın Port Authority on Friday due to bad weather conditions, broke and sank on Jan. 17, the ministry said.

The ministry added that rescue efforts are underway to rescue the remainder of the crew.

In a statement, the Turkish National Defense Ministry announced that the country’s navy deployed a frigate to support the rescue effort.

Crap radio drills
 
There are three fishermen missing off Conwy coast and have been for 36+ hours.
 
They didn't seem to raise the alarm in the ship. Unless the Master knew where everyone was those below decks should have been informed what was happening or the General Alarm used (or whatever it is called on civvy ships)
 

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