Those In Peril Upon The Sea

The French Frigate D646 Latouche-Tréville, looking good there.
I used to know an RNR two-and-a-half ringer and his wife (a Wren 2O) who got married to that.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer

Mrsheeny

Old-Salt
Chanel ferry, Christmas Eve 1999 coming back from Austria.

Sat down as it was impossible to walk, spewed up on the floor and then watched as it moved from one side of the corridor to the other and back again the sea was that rough.
 

philc

LE
Chanel ferry, Christmas Eve 1999 coming back from Austria.

Sat down as it was impossible to walk, spewed up on the floor and then watched as it moved from one side of the corridor to the other and back again the sea was that rough.
Who knew the Chanel ferry docked in Austria, good to know.
 
Took a cargo ship to the Shetlands in February. On our return a Storm kicked in and through the windows was the sky, then the ocean... way deeper than we had wished to see. The chains on the Heavy excavators we had were groaning and cracking and even the crew looked extremely nervous.. I found out the lip on those tables is to keep all the puke from spilling onto the floor. A bit was self inflicted as we were half drunk/hungover and loaded up with greasy deep fried Shetland food before departure.
 

endure

GCM
Took a cargo ship to the Shetlands in February. On our return a Storm kicked in and through the windows was the sky, then the ocean... way deeper than we had wished to see. The chains on the Heavy excavators we had were groaning and cracking and even the crew looked extremely nervous.. I found out the lip on those tables is to keep all the puke from spilling onto the floor. A bit was self inflicted as we were half drunk/hungover and loaded up with greasy deep fried Shetland food before departure.

The 'windows' were portholes and the 'lips' were fiddles... ;-)
 
The old ones are the best.



This video is great, you see some brit battleships (KGV?) and a carrier being thrown about in a storm in WW2.


The carrier being thrown around like a cork at the 2 minute mark is spectacular.
 
 
Was OC of the Marine Security Detachment in the ship's company of the USS Providence, a guided missile light cruiser built in 1944. She was 660' long and when we were in some typhoons in the middle of the Pacific, the waves would be way above my General Quarters station which was in the Mk37 Gunfire Director (a small turret-like affair just forward of the stacks and the highest manned point--about 80'--above the water). When heading straight into the waves they would crash over the bow for 2/3s of the length of the ship and would fully engulf the Director. Fun times.
PhotoPictureResizer_191010_200858217_crop_698x543.jpg
 

Guns

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
hms-edinburgh.jpg

Hang on.......
 
Image result for uss cruiser bows off 1944

On 4 June, Pittsburgh began to fight a typhoon which by early next day had increased to 70-knot (130 km/h) winds and 100-foot (30 m) waves. Shortly after her starboard scout plane had been lifted off its catapult and dashed onto the deck by the wind, Pittsburgh's second deck buckled, her bow structure thrust upward, and then the front fell off. However, not a man was lost. Still fighting the storm, and manoeuvring to avoid being rammed by the drifting bow-structure, Pittsburgh was held quarter-on to the seas by engine manipulations while the forward bulkhead was shored. After a seven-hour battle, the storm subsided, and Pittsburgh proceeded at 6 knots (11 km/h) to Guam, arriving on 10 June. Her bow, nicknamed "McKeesport" (a suburb of Pittsburgh), was later salvaged by the tugboat Munsee and brought into Guam. The 104-foot section of bow broke off owing to poor plate welds at the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Co. at the Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, Massachusetts, in April 1943.

With a false bow, Pittsburgh left Guam on 24 June bound for Puget Sound Navy Yard, arriving 16 July. Still under repair at war's end, she was placed in commission in reserve on 12 March 1946 and decommissioned on 7 March 1947. The typhoon damage also earned her the nickname "Longest Ship in the World" as thousands of miles separated the bow and stern.
 
Image result for uss cruiser bows off 1944

On 4 June, Pittsburgh began to fight a typhoon which by early next day had increased to 70-knot (130 km/h) winds and 100-foot (30 m) waves. Shortly after her starboard scout plane had been lifted off its catapult and dashed onto the deck by the wind, Pittsburgh's second deck buckled, her bow structure thrust upward, and then the front fell off. However, not a man was lost. Still fighting the storm, and manoeuvring to avoid being rammed by the drifting bow-structure, Pittsburgh was held quarter-on to the seas by engine manipulations while the forward bulkhead was shored. After a seven-hour battle, the storm subsided, and Pittsburgh proceeded at 6 knots (11 km/h) to Guam, arriving on 10 June. Her bow, nicknamed "McKeesport" (a suburb of Pittsburgh), was later salvaged by the tugboat Munsee and brought into Guam. The 104-foot section of bow broke off owing to poor plate welds at the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Co. at the Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, Massachusetts, in April 1943.

With a false bow, Pittsburgh left Guam on 24 June bound for Puget Sound Navy Yard, arriving 16 July. Still under repair at war's end, she was placed in commission in reserve on 12 March 1946 and decommissioned on 7 March 1947. The typhoon damage also earned her the nickname "Longest Ship in the World" as thousands of miles separated the bow and stern.
I can certainly attest that Pacific typhoons should be respected!
 

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