Thinking of getting into the field - what should I study?

I was chatting to my neighbour the other day and he does something to do with the Cloud. It seems quite a cushy job as he gets to work from home.

I'm looking at a career change and computers are undoubtedly the future. If you really know how to use them then it also provides you with plenty of employment options.

Does anyone here work in IT? What is the market like? Is there any particular course I should look at doing, or should I read around the subject and see what's interesting?

I didn't realise at first what a vast enterprise IT was and how many different specialisations there were. What do you think would be a good one to get into?

As the Chinese are hacking everyone, I guess cyber security would be a goer, but it's likely to be post grad, expensive and complicated. Ideally, I'd like to weasel in without too much investment. Perhaps coding may be a better bet, or just a general all round knowledge of computers and networks?

My vague plan is to get into something like the NHS and learn their stuff then go private. In reality I have no idea what I'm doing, so I bow to the superior knowledge and advice of arrse.
 
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Cant imagine anything more boring... well maybe factory work


What jobs don't suck donkey phallus?

Construction you got early morning starts and if you do labour your body takes it.

99% of other jobs are staring at a computer screen anyway, either trying to sell shyt to someone, making websites, typing rubbish into Excel spreadsheets or emails in Outlook/Word. Alternatively, you could work in a shop and have the horror of customer service.

If you do ICT you learn how to take stuff apart and fix it, and that would also help with fixing my own equipment or upgrading it. There's also a higher chance of working from home, that means no bs commute or having to sit in a god-awful office. It also probably pays well if you know your stuff (I imagine, still looking into it). There's also more security as the world runs on computers.

It's not ideal, but what job is?
 

endure

GCM
If you do ICT you learn how to take stuff apart and fix it, and that would also help with fixing my own equipment or upgrading it. There's also a higher chance of working from home, that means no bs commute or having to sit in a god-awful office. It also probably pays well if you know your stuff (I imagine, still looking into it). There's also more security as the world runs on computers.
If you learn how to to take stuff apart and then fix it you have to be on a customer site to do so...
 
If you learn how to to take stuff apart and then fix it you have to be on a customer site to do so...
This is true, but you don't have to be there 99% of the time. I've had a look at some of the job specs. Many are working from home with a bit of travel to fix company PDAs etc.
 

endure

GCM
This is true, but you don't have to be there 99% of the time. I've had a look at some of the job specs. Many are working from home with a bit of travel to fix company PDAs etc.
I spent all of my working life ashore fixing stuff and it meant spending every day out on the road.

The great benefit is that you meet walk onto a site that has a problem and you walk off having fixed it. Apart from the gratitude of the punters you get an enormous amount of self satisfaction out of it.

If you just want a job where you sit on your arse at home you'll be bored to tears in 10 minutes.
 
What jobs don't suck donkey phallus?

Construction you got early morning starts and if you do labour your body takes it.

99% of other jobs are staring at a computer screen anyway, either trying to sell shyt to someone, making websites, typing rubbish into Excel spreadsheets or emails in Outlook/Word. Alternatively, you could work in a shop and have the horror of customer service.

If you do ICT you learn how to take stuff apart and fix it, and that would also help with fixing my own equipment or upgrading it. There's also a higher chance of working from home, that means no bs commute or having to sit in a god-awful office. It also probably pays well if you know your stuff (I imagine, still looking into it). There's also more security as the world runs on computers.

It's not ideal, but what job is?

You'll be competing for a school-leaver's wage with actual school-leavers who'll have better qualifications and more experience than you.
 
I'm fairly certain if you ever get a job in IT, you'll hate it.

This. Chucked the IT dodge to go play loadmaster on an ageing airframe in one of the shittier bits of Africa. Had more fun living in an old ruin and working my arse off every day than dealing with user wuckfittery and trying to emulsify my liver with beer every night to blank out the stupid.
 

TamH70

MIA
I was chatting to my neighbour the other day and he does something to do with the Cloud. It seems quite a cushy job as he gets to work from home.

I'm looking at a career change and computers are undoubtedly the future. If you really know how to use them then it also provides you with plenty of employment options.

Does anyone here work in IT? What is the market like? Is there any particular course I should look at doing, or should I read around the subject and see what's interesting?

I didn't realise at first what a vast enterprise IT was and how many different specialisations there were. What do you think would be a good one to get into?

As the Chinese are hacking everyone, I guess cyber security would be a goer, but it's likely to be post grad, expensive and complicated. Ideally, I'd like to weasel in without too much investment. Perhaps coding may be a better bet, or just a general all round knowledge of computers and networks?

My vague plan is to get into something like the NHS and learn their stuff then go private. In reality I have no idea what I'm doing, so I bow to the superior knowledge and advice of arrse.

If you want the Billy Bones Basics of IT stuff, the absolute basement level of that would be the European Computer Driving License, or ECDL.

Your local council's further education spods should be able to get you started.

ECDL Online Training | Home page for a bit more detail.

They can also offer fairly cheap follow-up courses if they're anything like mine, I did Developing Further In I.T. and things like that through West College Scotland and Renfrewshire Council.

Taking things further on you have courses like Comp TIA - more details here:

CompTIA - Wikipedia

Be careful with your choice of provider. If approached by a door-stepper, slam the door in their face faster than you would for a Jehovah's Witness Flatnose.

As for coding, well, what do you want to learn to code for? Games developers do a lot of hours for crap wages and get treated worse, but the work they do can last for a long time.

On the subject of cybersecurity, you can get in on the ground floor from this place for under a grand, and they claim to pay you back if you don't get a job pronto.


That's just one of many results for a cyber security courses keyword search on Bing, there are a lot of them out there and I don't recommend that you dive in on that one, it's just an example.
 
I was chatting to my neighbour the other day and he does something to do with the Cloud. It seems quite a cushy job as he gets to work from home.

This is a double-edged sword. "Getting to" work from home, as many people have discovered during the current mass panic, isn't all advantageous.

Anyway it's free to get started so you can kick the tyres and see if it's for you


Other clouds are available if you prefer... Tons of free material on Youtube as well.
 

endure

GCM
The problem with working from home in IT is that it can be done just as easily from Delhi as from Derby and at a quarter the price...
 

SpiderFox

Clanker
My experience:
I started in IT in 1995, I had years of experience with PC's at home before that. I joined a department of about 120 staff, and all the IT duties (desktop support, networking, programming, etc. etc.) were handled by just 3 of us.

Fast forward to 2019 when I retired; all the IT staff had been moved to the main office supporting over 4,000 staff, and all the IT jobs were specialised, i.e. I now just focussed on one small area which (to simplify it) was linking the legacy VME, unix systems, etc., with the Windows Servers.

My point is that you'll probably need to specialise in an area you like and are good at, and focus on that. Expect the job to evolve and change too, so general knowledge of other areas will definitely help too.

As for boredom, I never was. There were several changes in management in the last few years I was there and no one had a clue what I was doing and just left me alone!

HTH
 
I was chatting to my neighbour the other day and he does something to do with the Cloud. It seems quite a cushy job as he gets to work from home.

I'm looking at a career change and computers are undoubtedly the future. If you really know how to use them then it also provides you with plenty of employment options.

Does anyone here work in IT? What is the market like? Is there any particular course I should look at doing, or should I read around the subject and see what's interesting?

I didn't realise at first what a vast enterprise IT was and how many different specialisations there were. What do you think would be a good one to get into?

As the Chinese are hacking everyone, I guess cyber security would be a goer, but it's likely to be post grad, expensive and complicated. Ideally, I'd like to weasel in without too much investment. Perhaps coding may be a better bet, or just a general all round knowledge of computers and networks?

My vague plan is to get into something like the NHS and learn their stuff then go private. In reality I have no idea what I'm doing, so I bow to the superior knowledge and advice of arrse.

Learning IT isn't like learning to weld or lay bricks, you need an aptitude for it. (Granted, you need an aptitude/ desire to be good at anything.)
However, it is worth noting that I have worked in and around IT for a while, most people that I have met and worked with are incompetent to a significant extent, most are straight out blaggers.

Learning to code can begin at home with self study and free resources but you need an aptitude for maths.
But, lots of dev stuff is done abroad because it's cheaper and they are more inclined to get on with it than 20something Brits who are probably anti-capitalist/ entitled/ lazy and narcoticaly inclined. It's a dull job in which you will be dealing with the biggest bellends the nation has to offer!
Cyber security is going to be increasingly important, that is a fair bet. No need to learn coding, just learn the principles, understand the tools and policies and away you go- everyone's an expert!
 

JCC

LE
Unless you have a degree in some sort of IT related field you'll find it difficult to get a start. If you were interested in IT or programming you'd have been doing for years at home already.

Security is a biggie so look up the wages for that but you'll be competing with bright young Indians who live and breath the subject - luckily they're not great at IT but they are available and cheap.

This ticket would get you started and plenty work from home at it.

Cyber Security Certifications - GIAC Certifications will get you tickets

Penetration Testing with Kali Linux (PWK) | Offensive Security will make you a God IIIrd grade and is the one I'd recommend.
 
I was chatting to my neighbour the other day and he does something to do with the Cloud. It seems quite a cushy job as he gets to work from home.

I'm looking at a career change and computers are undoubtedly the future. If you really know how to use them then it also provides you with plenty of employment options.

Does anyone here work in IT? What is the market like? Is there any particular course I should look at doing, or should I read around the subject and see what's interesting?

I didn't realise at first what a vast enterprise IT was and how many different specialisations there were. What do you think would be a good one to get into?

As the Chinese are hacking everyone, I guess cyber security would be a goer, but it's likely to be post grad, expensive and complicated. Ideally, I'd like to weasel in without too much investment. Perhaps coding may be a better bet, or just a general all round knowledge of computers and networks?

My vague plan is to get into something like the NHS and learn their stuff then go private. In reality I have no idea what I'm doing, so I bow to the superior knowledge and advice of arrse.
IT Project Management may be more your thing. Friend left the forces 6 years ago (as a Captain); he's been getting 6 figures (just) for the last year or so (London rates).

General all-round knowledge won't get you far...as it's general. Loads of people have it. Coding is competitive, and takes a long time to learn, and is low-salary. Perhaps look at jobs for large organisations with involvement in cyber (Banks, Facebook, Amazon etc) and see what quals/experience they're looking for? Or look at civil service jobs.

What kind of salary are you looking for?
 
He may have meant TechVets, from google - UK based. Never heard of them before, but for those interested:


Some people might assume it's an organisation founded by VSOs for the purpose of hoovering up government training (and other) grants in exchange for a figleaf of outsourced and outdated training and five free goes on their "specialised" employment agency web page.

But I'm not going to do that because I'm not a cynic.
 
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