Things you don't get ....... but everyone else does

Nomad1382

War Hero
I'm 5'10"ish (in heels) and a girl at work being clever in front of everyone asked if I'd ever wanted to be a bit bigger.

"Yes" I replied, "And I wouldn't mind being a few inches taller as well".

Did she blush.
I wear a Medic-Alert bracelet for a penicillin alergy that also lists that I'm an organ donor. Had a waitress one night ask me if I donate my organ, every chance I get was my response. She turned a very nice shade of red.
 
I have been hearing people (mostly lazy 'educators' (and other spackoids who should know better) telling us that Latin (and for the same reasons Greek if you understand what I mean) is a dead language since I was at primary school.
This, I knew even then, was utter bollox as they were and are universal languages in so many professions such as law, medicine, taxonomy and other fields despite the efforts of barbarians.
My schools', primary and secondary, 'progressiveness' in not teaching us even the basics was a massive drawback for myself, barring me from much extra-curricular research and, amongst other factors, caused the school itself to drop out of the top hundred in the country to wayyyyy down the tables, never to resurface.
Another reason (amongst many) that I gave up the civvy career sh!te to join the infantry.

You miss my point. Latin is not spoken. By anyone. It may be a language used to describe various things in a written form, but it is not a language of conversation.

I can read and write microprocessor assembly language, but I don't speak it. While in law there are terms such as "mens rea" or "habeas corpus", they are used in abstract. The prosecutor does not establish the presence of mens rea by stating his case in Latin. He must establish the presence of intent, but does so by presenting evidence and situating that evidence in the case, in the language of the court, not in Latin.
 

clambuster

Old-Salt
Quod Erat Demonstratum? Loosely - "I have said it and shown it", a less literal version being "I said it and here's the reason/proof why I'm right". I can say all that despite quite definitely not speaking Latin.

Standby for someone who actually knows to correct me in 3, 2, 1...
That might actually be "Quod erat demonstrandum". What if anything do you teach?
 
You miss my point. Latin is not spoken. By anyone. It may be a language used to describe various things in a written form, but it is not a language of conversation.

I can read and write microprocessor assembly language, but I don't speak it. While in law there are terms such as "mens rea" or "habeas corpus", they are used in abstract. The prosecutor does not establish the presence of mens rea by stating his case in Latin. He must establish the presence of intent, but does so by presenting evidence and situating that evidence in the case, in the language of the court, not in Latin.
Yes it is. By scholars and Catholics. Until 2019, there was even a 5 minute news broadcast on Finnish radio.
 

clambuster

Old-Salt
You miss my point. Latin is not spoken. By anyone. It may be a language used to describe various things in a written form, but it is not a language of conversation.

I can read and write microprocessor assembly language, but I don't speak it. While in law there are terms such as "mens rea" or "habeas corpus", they are used in abstract. The prosecutor does not establish the presence of mens rea by stating his case in Latin. He must establish the presence of intent, but does so by presenting evidence and situating that evidence in the case, in the language of the court, not in Latin.
As in "Certa cito", "Fixed quickly" being the more literal. As you say it's not really a spoken language. It does however help us to understand the development of "English" and helps with an educated guess on those BIG words.
 
I would very much question the idea that learning Latin provides you with an ability to understand other languages, it certainly was no help to me in gaining O' levels in Spanish and Italian and an O' and A' level in French.

If anything my big breakthrough in learning French (which helped me with the other two) was precisely when I stopped trying to hammer the language into its Latin structure (I still have no idea what hic, haec, hoc, hunc, huis whatever the other one was, actually refers to, only that I got four of the best if I couldn't recite it) and simply started speaking and reading that beautiful language as often and as freely as possible.

And as someone who taught English a long time ago I found the greatest thing I could teach my students was to try and relax when it comes to all the rules about tenses and grammar and just bloody speak the language as well and as naturally as they could. There was nothing more frustrating than watching someone freeze up afraid to speak in English because they were unsure whether they should be using the past subjunctive or the ninth conditional or a dangling imperative when describing what they did at the weekend.

As for the law, there is not a single legal concept expressed in Latin that can't be expressed in English, I suspect the continued use of Latin by m'learned friends is part of the subtle conspiracy to keep as many jobs for the old school tie boys as possible.
 
On a similar note, what is the big deal about stockings and suspenders? How exactly do they make female legs look more attractive? Why not a sensual and smooth bare leg?

They are inconvenient for the wearer, and no good for disguising one's face. When did they become associated with sexiness?

Because you start at the bottom, kissing your way up, and see where you go when reach the top.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Shirley you’re stymied by the fact that the mouth can only hold so many teef.

Yes, but there is then the matter of what the teeth are made of.
 
As in "Certa cito", "Fixed quickly" being the more literal. As you say it's not really a spoken language. It does however help us to understand the development of "English" and helps with an educated guess on those BIG words.
Can you explain this then?

Pro is good and con is bad. So progress is moving forward and to be welcomed, whereas congress is...? What about flammable and inflammable? Confluence, effluence, influence and affluence?

Etymology is a hit and miss game half the time.
 
Viewers of Yes, Minister may recall an episode in which a constituency MP wants to speak to the Minister about a chemical company that wants to build a plant in her constituency. It will produce compounds for industry, but she does not know what a compound is. Sir Humphrey does not know either - and does not know what to tell the Minister.

Can you say that has not happened in real life?
I am currently doing very important things in the civil service - well sort of, but definitely not at the Sir Humphrey level.

Earlier today I was asked a legal question - I sent an email to our legal section. I occasionally talk to our science advisor too.

“The next best thing to knowing something is knowing where to find it...”. Samuel Johnson
(and I only know that quote as it was on the cover of the dictionary that my parents bought me when I was about 13 - and is on the shelf above my computer desk where I can see it now)

ETA: I occasionally sit on an inbox where all sorts of questions relating to our area come in from across our ministry - I usually first do a search through the inbox to see if anyone has asked this before, then tend to fire it off to someone who know more than me about this. On very rare occasions I might be able to answer something because I know about it. VERY rare occasions.
 
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Yokel

LE

Well done - you spotted the deliberate mistake.

I do not get how some people have such a total disregard for attention to detail. More than that, I fail to grasp why paying attention to detail often gets labelled as 'autistic', as if it is an undesirable character trait. Graveyards are full of people who died young because they or someone else ignored details.
 
Well done - you spotted the deliberate mistake.

I do not get how some people have such a total disregard for attention to detail. More than that, I fail to grasp why paying attention to detail often gets labelled as 'autistic', as if it is an undesirable character trait. Graveyards are full of people who died young because they or someone else ignored details.
No they're not. There are lots of others in graveyards that don't fall into that category: Probably the majority. You should pay more attention to detail.
 

Yokel

LE
No they're not. There are lots of others in graveyards that don't fall into that category: Probably the majority. You should pay more attention to detail.

Very true - but many go there at a young age because they forgot to pay attention to detail. Why bother reading the information that comes with your prescription telling you not to drink alcohol? Why bother with road signs - what could possibly go wrong? Why not mix cleaner a with cleaner b - it probably will not produce toxic fumes.
 
Very true - but many go there at a young age because they forgot to pay attention to detail. Why bother reading the information that comes with your prescription telling you not to drink alcohol? Why bother with road signs - what could possibly go wrong? Why not mix cleaner a with cleaner b - it probably will not produce toxic fumes.
I was pulling your leg.

The point you make is correct. It has always been that way and always will be. Darwinism in action.
 
Graveyards are full of people who died young because they or someone else ignored details.
No they're not, there's always room for few more.

Attention to detail, hrmphhhh.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
As little as possible :)
I should rephrase my question.

What is the job description for a "sales engineer," and is it necessary to have a degree in engineering to carry out these duties ?
 
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