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Things that irritate me

Further to my last, after struggling to get the telly down 't shop yesterday, it's now back home, with three new backlights and all seems to be working fine.

I got a deal on the repair cost though the two guys who run the shop will be having a fight over it on Monday - one of the owners quoted 120 quid and the other 70. And the first one said that there'd be no way it would be ready today, and quoted a Tuesday possibility.

Being a nice guy, and also Scottish, I phoned the shop like I'd been asked to on the shop's actual landline number, instead of the mobile one that's on the webpage, got the second owner this time, and he said the telly was fine, the bill would be seventy quid, and he'd deliver it to my door on the way back home for free.

As the shop owners are also both Scottish, expect an argument between the two owners on Monday morning over the outstanding fifty quid.
They’re from Paisley, and therefore always willing to help a hardship case.
 
I bought something very similar to this at the local Morrisons.

View attachment 496715

Half a carrot, half an onion, a chunk out of a white or red cabbage, and a dollop of mayonnaise and 5 mins later I've got coleslaw for two. No faff

I bought one of those on impulse many years ago at an Ideal Home Exhibition (I'm every demonstrator's wet dream). Since when it has languished unmolested in the further recesses of a cupboard.

Encouraged by this thread, I made some of my own coleslaw the other day (using chopping board, knife and grater. It's a bit on the chunky side but perfectly fine if eaten immediately. But I have since been reminded of another homemade coleslaw issue. Liquid accumulating at the bottom of the container of any stored coleslaw.

Perhaps the cut veg needs first to be salted (to draw out the water), rinsed and drained - but that just introduces another level or two of faff. No doubt producers add some kind of an emulsifier.
 
Perhaps the cut veg needs first to be salted (to draw out the water), rinsed and drained - but that just introduces another level or two of faff. No doubt producers add some kind of an emulsifier.

I have made coleslaw a few times and indeed I have salted the veg and left it overnight before squeezing it in a tea-towel to get the excess liquid out. Keeps well in the fridge for a couple of days.
 
Just when I thought that the pandemic had spared us from the BBC's customary annual corporate move to the Edinburgh Bloody Festival, the BBC have conspired to deprive me of this welcome break.

Seemingly unable to function normally during the month of August without setting off as a caravan in the direction of Dunedin, they have contrived to bring us a virtual fringe.

Here the usual 'comedians' talk, interrupt and overreact to one another on the phone from the sterile privacy of their own bedrooms, in the customary pandemic style. But now they pretend to be at a virtual Edinburgh Festival.

I imagine that the submitted expenses chits will be treated in the same virtual manner

Has it really come to this? So far, the phenomenon has been confined to the BBC 'comedy' output, Surely 'Arts' won't want to be left behind in 'real' London suburbia.

Anyone got any ideas for a virtual Military Tattoo? I'm sure that there will be many who will say that the Royal Military Tattoo has been only virtually military for many years.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Whingeing teenagers and teachers whining that IT'S SO UNFAIR!

Stupid journalists encouraging them.
 
Whingeing teenagers and teachers whining that IT'S SO UNFAIR!

It was always going to happen.

There was whingeing about grades even when there are proper exams, particularly during the period when grades were escalating annually. "I only go two A+++ and one A++ when I got three A++++ in my mocks".

Unfortunately the dogs dinner of the results moderation system has lent some credibility to their moaning.
 
Internet phone calls. My consultant rang me on friday , the call was over the internet and for the main unintelligible, none of us listening could understand it , all made worse I suspect by using a speaker phone ,and the time lag made interrupting impossible ,all this over a distance of 35 miles, whats wrong with a proper telephone.

Still not sure what he wanted.
 
Internet phone calls. My consultant rang me on friday , the call was over the internet and for the main unintelligible, none of us listening could understand it , all made worse I suspect by using a speaker phone ,and the time lag made interrupting impossible ,all this over a distance of 35 miles, whats wrong with a proper telephone.

Still not sure what he wanted.
Was this from Ninewells? My consultant in Ninewells called me last Friday, just to see how I was getting on. Long story, but the short version is that I haven’t had a consultation since December, and several things have happened in the meantime. I was actually quite encouraged speaking to him.
 
Was this from Ninewells? My consultant in Ninewells called me last Friday, just to see how I was getting on. Long story, but the short version is that I haven’t had a consultation since December, and several things have happened in the meantime. I was actually quite encouraged speaking to him.
Nope Aberdeen,undergoing treatment,may have been important or maybe could I pick up a copy of the radio times for him,I dunno
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Internet phone calls. My consultant rang me on friday , the call was over the internet and for the main unintelligible, none of us listening could understand it , all made worse I suspect by using a speaker phone ,and the time lag made interrupting impossible ,all this over a distance of 35 miles, whats wrong with a proper telephone.

Still not sure what he wanted.
To feel important...
 
Internet phone calls. My consultant rang me on friday , the call was over the internet and for the main unintelligible, none of us listening could understand it , all made worse I suspect by using a speaker phone ,and the time lag made interrupting impossible ,all this over a distance of 35 miles, whats wrong with a proper telephone.

Still not sure what he wanted.

He wanted to tell you that you have 72 hours to live
 
Interviewees on the radio who, after being introduced by the interviewer say, "Hello. Thanks for having me.".

Jesus Christ, when I was a kid, that's what our mum's used to tell us to say to our mates' mums after we'd been invited over for tea.

On a BBC interview, they are very obligingly filling what would otherwise be dead air and assisting the broadcaster in having a programme to broadcast. Furthermore, the interviewer is probably just about to pull them apart in front of the nation in the same way a naughty child might pull the legs off an insect.

Something else, I suspect, that has reached us from the other side of the pond, along with the default and increasingly common, "That's a really great question" response to any question at all, no matter how lame or mundane it might be.

I do quite like it, though, when being introduced, the interviewee says to the interviewer, "Hi, how are you?"
It is always immediately obvious that interviewers do not really like this. They might respond with a tetchy 'fine' or even no response at all before launching into the first question. It seems to throw them.

I'm not completely sure why they don't like it. Are these call-and-response social niceties using up precious broadcasting seconds? Do they serve to remove control of the course of the interview from the interviewer?
Whatever it is, the irritation is obvious and quite funny to hear.

(@bigeye might have an idea. He's probably the nearest thing we have to a meeja type)
 
Interviewees on the radio who, after being introduced by the interviewer say, "Hello. Thanks for having me.".

Jesus Christ, when I was a kid, that's what our mum's used to tell us to say to our mates' mums after we'd been invited over for tea.

On a BBC interview, they are very obligingly filling what would otherwise be dead air and assisting the broadcaster in having a programme to broadcast. Furthermore, the interviewer is probably just about to pull them apart in front of the nation in the same way a naughty child might pull the legs off an insect.

Something else, I suspect, that has reached us from the other side of the pond, along with the default and increasingly common, "That's a really great question" response to any question at all, no matter how lame or mundane it might be.

I do quite like it, though, when being introduced, the interviewee says to the interviewer, "Hi, how are you?"
It is always immediately obvious that interviewers do not really like this. They might respond with a tetchy 'fine' or even no response at all before launching into the first question. It seems to throw them.

I'm not completely sure why they don't like it. Are these call-and-response social niceties using up precious broadcasting seconds? Do they serve to remove control of the course of the interview from the interviewer?
Whatever it is, the irritation is obvious and quite funny to hear.

(@bigeye might have an idea. He's probably the nearest thing we have to a meeja type)
Based on this and your previous post, have you considered removing the BBC from your life entirely?
 
Based on this and your previous post, have you considered removing the BBC from your life entirely?

I think it's becoming increasingly likely. I need to find an alternative to Radio 4, to which my radio is permanently tuned. It was once a reasonably safe haven from the mindless trendiness that afflicted other stations. No longer it seems.

Gairmany Calling! Gairmany Calling!
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
Something else that I don't like about the BBC - especially on the Breakfast programme - is the very sad piano music played to enhance the pity in a morbid subject. Fools!
 
I do quite like it, though, when being introduced, the interviewee says to the interviewer, "Hi, how are you?"
It is always immediately obvious that interviewers do not really like this. They might respond with a tetchy 'fine' or even no response at all before launching into the first question. It seems to throw them.

I'm not completely sure why they don't like it. Are these call-and-response social niceties using up precious broadcasting seconds? Do they serve to remove control of the course of the interview from the interviewer?
Whatever it is, the irritation is obvious and quite funny to hear.

(@bigeye might have an idea. He's probably the nearest thing we have to a meeja type)

Radio 4's Today Programme can get though about 20 interviews per show. They don't like responding to platitudes because if every time the interviewer answered with, for example: 'well I can't complain, thanks for asking..except my bloody piles are playing up Old Harry again...' it would take up a lot of time and be terribly repetitive.

'Meeja type' is a prerogative pejorative term amongst us grubby technicians BTW.
 
Radio 4's Today Programme can get though about 20 interviews per show. They don't like responding to platitudes because if every time the interviewer answered with, for example: 'well I can't complain, thanks for asking..except my bloody piles are playing up Old Harry again...' it would take up a lot of time and be terribly repetitive.

Ah yes, as I suspected.

'Meeja type' is a prerogative pejorative term amongst us grubby technicians BTW.

Fair enough. How about 'roadie'?

ETA: Talking of the Today Programme, I've always thought that the 40 mins or so after the 08:10 interview are a waste of space. All the main subjects have already been covered, weather forecasts delivered, sport droned on about. The rest is just filler and rushed and often prematurely truncated interviews..... and. of course, the traditional presenter crashing the pips.
 
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