Things that irritate me

Hang on. Did @CaptainRidiculous just assume it's species?

The vile alphabetti-spaghetti bigot.
 
The Top Cop, defending her ridiculous hairstyle, said it was important that the police service welcomed the diversity that she represented.
Why is it important?
Give me three reasons that don't include anything other than "upholding the law" stuff.
So, to be clear, any alphabetti-spaghetti or multi-culti stuff are not valid reasons.
 

Offa

Old-Salt
It may already have been mentioned, but the term 'power outage' annoys. Is there a difference between ' outage' and 'cut'? Can't be for brevity, 6 v 3.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
Listening to a famous comedian on Radio 4 this afternoon ( I missed his name) He said he quit the stage when it became the rule, to be given a list of about 35 things that he should not mention during his jokes. The list is much longer for appearing on national Radio and TV shows. The politically correct prats have now sucked the guts out of our British humour! Irritating Bastards one and all!
 

Awol

LE
Why is it important?
Give me three reasons that don't include anything other than "upholding the law" stuff.
So, to be clear, any alphabetti-spaghetti or multi-culti stuff are not valid reasons.
Why are you asking me? I was just quoting what the top cop said. I think her hairstyle makes a mockery of the police and millions will think the same. Being 'above the collar' means it is within police guidelines, but if a young, heterosexual PC wanted to sport a six inch high, punk, fake blonde, mohican, would he/she be allowed? The answer is a resounding no, unless they were homosexual, in which case it would be a resounding yes.

That is why the police are losing more respect as each day passes, and why the gayxyz 'community' are facing increasing resentment from the other 98% of the public
 
Why are you asking me? I was just quoting what the top cop said. I think her hairstyle makes a mockery of the police and millions will think the same. Being 'above the collar' means it is within police guidelines, but if a young, heterosexual PC wanted to sport a six inch high punk, fake blonde, mohican, would he/be allowed? The answer is a resounding no, unless they were homosexual, in which case it would be a resounding yes.

That is why the police are losing more respect as each day passes, and why the gayxyz 'community' are facing increasing resentment from the other 98% of the public
I was being rhetorical. Durrrr. ;)
 
Listening to a famous comedian on Radio 4 this afternoon ( I missed his name) He said he quit the stage when it became the rule, to be given a list of about 35 things that he should not mention during his jokes. The list is much longer for appearing on national Radio and TV shows. The politically correct prats have now sucked the guts out of our British humour! Irritating Bastards one and all!
His routine should have consisted of reading out the list. So, "I'm not allowed to makes jokes about the following...". Then finish the routine by asking, "Now which (reads out list again) pillock thought that lot up?"
 
Why are you asking me? I was just quoting what the top cop said. I think her hairstyle makes a mockery of the police and millions will think the same. Being 'above the collar' means it is within police guidelines, but if a young, heterosexual PC wanted to sport a six inch high, punk, fake blonde, mohican, would he/she be allowed? The answer is a resounding no, unless they were homosexual, in which case it would be a resounding yes.

That is why the police are losing more respect as each day passes, and why the gayxyz 'community' are facing increasing resentment from the other 98% of the public
I truly, honestly don’t care which way an individual swings - it’s their business and as long as they don’t make homosexuality compulsory, I’m happy to leave them to it, males and females.
What does piss me off however, is the constant quest of the gay community to ‘achieve equality’ whatever the hell that means. They achieved it decades ago, but still feel the need to drone on about how oppressed they all are. Quite frankly, as a white heterosexual, I’m the one who feels in the minority nowadays.
Straight Pride Parade anyone?!
 

Awol

LE
I truly, honestly don’t care which way an individual swings - it’s their business and as long as they don’t make homosexuality compulsory, I’m happy to leave them to it, males and females.
What does piss me off however, is the constant quest of the gay community to ‘achieve equality’ whatever the hell that means. They achieved it decades ago, but still feel the need to drone on about how oppressed they all are. Quite frankly, as a white heterosexual, I’m the one who feels in the minority nowadays.
Straight Pride Parade anyone?!
Straight parades (Boston, for one) have existed for some time.

Somehow the MSM misses them.
 
Why are you asking me? I was just quoting what the top cop said. I think her hairstyle makes a mockery of the police and millions will think the same. Being 'above the collar' means it is within police guidelines, but if a young, heterosexual PC wanted to sport a six inch high, punk, fake blonde, mohican, would he/she be allowed? The answer is a resounding no, unless they were homosexual, in which case it would be a resounding yes.

That is why the police are losing more respect as each day passes, and why the gayxyz 'community' are facing increasing resentment from the other 98% of the public
What currently boils my piss is the BBC News website's unceasing pushing of LGBTQXRZWhateverthefuck stuff of late.
It's every bloody day & IT'S NOT NEWS.
 
Why are you asking me? I was just quoting what the top cop said. I think her hairstyle makes a mockery of the police and millions will think the same. Being 'above the collar' means it is within police guidelines, but if a young, heterosexual PC wanted to sport a six inch high, punk, fake blonde, mohican, would he/she be allowed? The answer is a resounding no, unless they were homosexual, in which case it would be a resounding yes.

That is why the police are losing more respect as each day passes, and why the gayxyz 'community' are facing increasing resentment from the other 98% of the public
Awol, it’s because times have changed. When I joined the police (1995) the regulations were about the same as the army. Hair and beards to be kept neat. For women that meant a bob cut, or up off the collar, anyway. In the force I joined, tattoos were permissible to a point. If you had them you had to show them to an ACC and they would decide. Hands, face, neck were a no-no.
Then “you can’t tell people what to do” came in, and standards slipped.
But went up, in a way. My intake of eight had no-one with a degree (I think), but former soldiers, sailors and people from quite diverse backgrounds. And not one silly haircut between us. You could have been a copper for one day, or thirty years, the public don’t know and don’t care. They want a job done, not funny hair cuts, amusing tattoos, medal ribbons on your stab vest.
 
Why are you asking me? I was just quoting what the top cop said. I think her hairstyle makes a mockery of the police and millions will think the same. Being 'above the collar' means it is within police guidelines, but if a young, heterosexual PC wanted to sport a six inch high, punk, fake blonde, mohican, would he/she be allowed? The answer is a resounding no, unless they were homosexual, in which case it would be a resounding yes.

That is why the police are losing more respect as each day passes, and why the gayxyz 'community' are facing increasing resentment from the other 98% of the public
Can you still call Greta a mong faced downie?
 
Try 'load shedding'...
Saffer word for rolling blackouts.
"
Why the lights keep going out in South Africa
E.C.S. | JOHANNESBURG FEBRUARY 21, 2019


FORGET THE weather forecast. South Africans these days are more interested in the outlook for rolling blackouts. The country’s most-downloaded app provides schedules, alerts and forecasts for power outages. Eskom, the state power monopoly, is struggling to generate enough electricity to meet needs, and has re-introduced a byzantine system of rotating outages known as “load-shedding.” On February 11th a whopping 4,000 megawatts of power, enough to power some 3m households, was cut from the national grid to prevent it from collapsing. Some businesses have bought generators and battery systems; others close during outages. In big cities, there is chaos at rush hour as traffic lights go dark. The blackouts suit copper-cable thieves, who can steal without fear of electrocution. And when the electricity is switched backed on, substations sometimes explode, resulting in secondary outages.

South Africa has been here before. A spell of load-shedding in 2007-08 was caused by a shortage of the coal that is used to generate most of the country’s electricity. In 2014 more blackouts followed delays in building new plants and maintenance backlogs at old ones. The latest power cuts have been linked to poor maintenance, and to a shortage of a different fuel: diesel. This is used in expensive open-cycle gas turbines that are meant to provide electricity in emergencies, but are now being used rather more often. Two massive new coal-fired stations, Kusile and Medupi, are years behind schedule, hugely over budget and plagued by technical problems. Eskom is beset by allegations of corruption and mismanagement.

The company’s troubles have their roots in the dysfunction of apartheid. South Africa’s power grid was designed to serve the white minority. After the first democratic elections in 1994, the new government, led by the African National Congress (ANC), connected poor black areas to the grid. Massive expansion was needed to meet surging demand. But stations have been dogged by accusations of contract irregularities. Eskom’s problems have been aggravated by the fact that many South Africans do not pay for their electricity. Municipalities often have outstanding payments, some individuals steal electricity through illegal connections, and others view electricity as something that the ANC should provide free of charge. The cost of electricity has duly risen, demand has now shrunk and some people have gone off grid altogether. On top of this, Eskom’s workforce is almost 50% larger than a decade ago, even though many skilled staff have responded to the drop in morale and the company’s increasing politicisation by leaving.

The result of all this chaos is a debt crisis. Eskom owes R419bn ($29.5bn), a debt it is unable to service. Government officials say it is technically insolvent. On February 20th the finance minister announced a partial bailout worth R69bn over the next three years, but said the government would not be taking on Eskom’s debt. Reform efforts have been stymied by the ANC’s left-wing partners. When Mr Ramaphosa announced plans to split Eskom into three parts—generation, transmission and distribution—to make it more transparent and efficient, trade unions led protests against the potential job losses. Ahead of elections on May 8th, the president will be wary of angering unions further. Perhaps the only upside of Eskom’s troubles is that South Africans are increasingly looking to renewable energy sources for cheaper, more reliable electricity."

Eskom also employed McKinsey for "advice" who ripped them off big time...guess I don't have to tell any Saffers here..
 
"
Why the lights keep going out in South Africa
E.C.S. | JOHANNESBURG FEBRUARY 21, 2019


FORGET THE weather forecast. South Africans these days are more interested in the outlook for rolling blackouts. The country’s most-downloaded app provides schedules, alerts and forecasts for power outages. Eskom, the state power monopoly, is struggling to generate enough electricity to meet needs, and has re-introduced a byzantine system of rotating outages known as “load-shedding.” On February 11th a whopping 4,000 megawatts of power, enough to power some 3m households, was cut from the national grid to prevent it from collapsing. Some businesses have bought generators and battery systems; others close during outages. In big cities, there is chaos at rush hour as traffic lights go dark. The blackouts suit copper-cable thieves, who can steal without fear of electrocution. And when the electricity is switched backed on, substations sometimes explode, resulting in secondary outages.

South Africa has been here before. A spell of load-shedding in 2007-08 was caused by a shortage of the coal that is used to generate most of the country’s electricity. In 2014 more blackouts followed delays in building new plants and maintenance backlogs at old ones. The latest power cuts have been linked to poor maintenance, and to a shortage of a different fuel: diesel. This is used in expensive open-cycle gas turbines that are meant to provide electricity in emergencies, but are now being used rather more often. Two massive new coal-fired stations, Kusile and Medupi, are years behind schedule, hugely over budget and plagued by technical problems. Eskom is beset by allegations of corruption and mismanagement.

The company’s troubles have their roots in the dysfunction of apartheid. South Africa’s power grid was designed to serve the white minority. After the first democratic elections in 1994, the new government, led by the African National Congress (ANC), connected poor black areas to the grid. Massive expansion was needed to meet surging demand. But stations have been dogged by accusations of contract irregularities. Eskom’s problems have been aggravated by the fact that many South Africans do not pay for their electricity. Municipalities often have outstanding payments, some individuals steal electricity through illegal connections, and others view electricity as something that the ANC should provide free of charge. The cost of electricity has duly risen, demand has now shrunk and some people have gone off grid altogether. On top of this, Eskom’s workforce is almost 50% larger than a decade ago, even though many skilled staff have responded to the drop in morale and the company’s increasing politicisation by leaving.

The result of all this chaos is a debt crisis. Eskom owes R419bn ($29.5bn), a debt it is unable to service. Government officials say it is technically insolvent. On February 20th the finance minister announced a partial bailout worth R69bn over the next three years, but said the government would not be taking on Eskom’s debt. Reform efforts have been stymied by the ANC’s left-wing partners. When Mr Ramaphosa announced plans to split Eskom into three parts—generation, transmission and distribution—to make it more transparent and efficient, trade unions led protests against the potential job losses. Ahead of elections on May 8th, the president will be wary of angering unions further. Perhaps the only upside of Eskom’s troubles is that South Africans are increasingly looking to renewable energy sources for cheaper, more reliable electricity."

Eskom also employed McKinsey for "advice" who ripped them off big time...guess I don't have to tell any Saffers here..
Couldn’t you have just said that someone forgot to put a shilling in the meter?
 
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