Things hotting up with Turkey

Yes I understand that in relation to the Falklands. However it is unlikely (very) that we will get involved in any action against Syria against Assad, especially in support of Turkeys adventures. Values on the international stage or not.

The bottom line has been 'is this in our interests'. And if Uncle Sam decides its not in his interest, I doubt if we will play. We have cut Defence too much.

Who was it who allegedly said "there are no votes in defence". Clue: it wasn't a Labour Chancellor.
You need to go back to the quote that sparked this.
The quote being " geography doesn;t change "It doesn't relate exclusively to the FI, rather the quote relates to the point of individuals in power being transient but their territories being permanent.
 
Suggestions for Greece:

1. Ask the Russians for help in preventing the refugees from entering Greece.

2. Order the military conscription of all refugees, who are sent back to Syria to fight.
 
I had to go looking for - and google this - what with coronovirus keeping everything else from our MSM :( !!

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Published by: Matina Stevis-Gridneff and Patrick Kingsley, The NEW YORK TIMES, on Friday 13 March 2020.


Confrontation at Greek Border

The country is winding down an aggressive two-week operation to move tens of thousands of migrants to its frontiers. But relations with Greece and Europe have suffered.


BRUSSELS — Turkey has signaled that it is winding down its two-week operation to aid the movement of tens of thousands of people toward Europe, following a tough on-the-ground response from Greek border guards and a tepid diplomatic reaction from European politicians.

Migrants at the Greek-Turkish land border began to be transported back to Istanbul by bus this week, witnesses at the border said, de-escalating a standoff that initially set off fears of another European migration crisis. Greek officials said the number of attempted border crossings had dwindled from thousands a day to a few hundred, and none were successful on Friday, even as sporadic exchanges of tear-gas with Turkish security forces continued.

Also Friday, Turkish officials announced that three human smugglers had each been sentenced to 125 years in prison for their roles in the death of a Syrian toddler, Alan Kurdi, whose drowning came to epitomize an earlier migration crisis, in 2015.

That announcement and the week’s other developments were interpreted by experts and European politicians as signals to Europe that the Turkish authorities were once again willing to police their borders and quell a second wave of migration.

It follows a tense period in which President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey attempted to engineer the reverse: a new migration crisis on Europe’s borders . . . .

. . . . On Feb. 28, the Turkish government announced it would no longer stop migrants trying to reach Europe, and it then drove hundreds to the threshold of Greece, live-streaming the process to encourage more to follow.

The move was perceived as an attempt to rally European support for Turkey’s military campaign in northern Syria, and more European aid for the four million refugees inside Turkey.

On at least one occasion, Turkish officials even forced migrants to leave. In a video clip filmed onboard a bus ferrying people to the border, reluctant migrants were shown being forced off the vehicle at gunpoint by officers in plain clothes, and beaten when they resisted.

Marc Pierini, a former European Union envoy to Turkey, called it “the first-ever refugee exodus, albeit a limited one, fully organized by one government against another.”

The border clash not only stirred fears of a new migration crisis, but it also saw both countries react with anger and tough tactics. The Greeks have been condemned for suspending asylum applications and detaining and returning some migrants to Turkey.

To foment a sense of crisis, Turkish security forces fired tear gas over the border at their Greek counterparts and provided journalists with footage of aggressive Greek responses to migrants. Mr. Erdogan accused Greek officials of behaving like officials in Nazi Germany.

But the Turks used aggressive tactics of their own.

Footage captured by The New York Times showed Turkish security forces standing aside to allow migrants to tear down part of a fence dividing Turkey and Greece. And other footage emerged of a Turkish vessel pursuing a Greek coast guard vessel in the Aegean, and of a Turkish armored vehicle ramming a border fence between the two countries.

The Turkish Interior Ministry then sent more guards to the border — not to prevent people from leaving without documents, but to stop Greece from returning them by force, according to the Turkish interior minister, Suleyman Soylu . . .
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I had to go looking for - and google this - what with coronovirus keeping everything else from our MSM :( !!

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Published by: Matina Stevis-Gridneff and Patrick Kingsley, The NEW YORK TIMES, on Friday 13 March 2020.


Confrontation at Greek Border

The country is winding down an aggressive two-week operation to move tens of thousands of migrants to its frontiers. But relations with Greece and Europe have suffered.


BRUSSELS — Turkey has signaled that it is winding down its two-week operation to aid the movement of tens of thousands of people toward Europe, following a tough on-the-ground response from Greek border guards and a tepid diplomatic reaction from European politicians.

Migrants at the Greek-Turkish land border began to be transported back to Istanbul by bus this week, witnesses at the border said, de-escalating a standoff that initially set off fears of another European migration crisis. Greek officials said the number of attempted border crossings had dwindled from thousands a day to a few hundred, and none were successful on Friday, even as sporadic exchanges of tear-gas with Turkish security forces continued.

Also Friday, Turkish officials announced that three human smugglers had each been sentenced to 125 years in prison for their roles in the death of a Syrian toddler, Alan Kurdi, whose drowning came to epitomize an earlier migration crisis, in 2015.

That announcement and the week’s other developments were interpreted by experts and European politicians as signals to Europe that the Turkish authorities were once again willing to police their borders and quell a second wave of migration.

It follows a tense period in which President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey attempted to engineer the reverse: a new migration crisis on Europe’s borders . . . .



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Wrong photos. Where are all the ones with women and little kids? A jackpot if you can find a toddler with blue eyes and fair hair.
 
With luck for the rest of us, either the Turkish military and the Anatolian peasantry will get sick of Erdogan soon and politics will return to what used to pass for 'normal', guided democracy in Asia Minor, or he'll go the full 'Recip the Magnificent' and the rest of the world will start treating him as the central asiatic despot that he wants to be, with punishing sanctions and diplomatic isolation.

'Turkey hosts more than 4 million refugees, not all of them Syrian. Its economy is not in good shape, not least because of Erdogan’s populist moves and a propensity to fuel deficits and inflation through massive projects of questionable economic value. Europeans would be more willing to listen to Erdogan, as would NATO, if he did not resort to intemperate language. An example is the claim made March 10 that “there is no difference between those images on the Greece border and what the Nazis did.”

'Erdogan constantly tries to play the United States, Russia, the European Union, the Syrian regime and the Gulf monarchies against one another. His decision to feed Syrian Turkmen, Chechens and European jihadists of North African origin into the Libyan conflict has not gone down well with NATO or the commission. The United States is furious at his buying of Russian anti-missile defence systems, which are incompatible with NATO systems. Many Western officials wonder whether Turkey is still a member of NATO.

'Nor has the Turkish leader's adventurist policy in northern Syrian gone down well in Paris, Washington or Berlin. Erdogan claims he is protecting more than 1 million Syrians caught in a trap in Idlib province between Syrian regime troops, strongly backed by the Russian Air Force, which can outgun its Turkish counterpart and Turkish troops, which occupy an increasingly narrow buffer in Syria.

'Turkish troops have spent most of their time hunting Kurdish forces, the key element in the fight against remnants of the Islamic State, than protecting Syrian civilians. Erdogan does not make any secret of his support for hard-line Islamic groups, be it in Syria or elsewhere. This puts him at odds with the United States, NATO, the EU Commission, Syria and Tunisia. Backed by its western neighbour, Tunisian President Kais Saied reportedly turned down Erdogan’s request two months ago for access to a base in southern Tunisia that would help him deploy military forces in Libya.

Turkey is playing so many geopolitical games across so many boards that it is tripping up in cross wires of contradictions that it cannot solve. Erdogan faces mounting opposition to his policies at home, including from former founding members of his Justice and Development Party. Major Turkish cities voted in favour of the opposition in last year’s municipal elections, despite the president forcing a second vote in Istanbul.

'Erdogan’s policies in Syria have left the Turkish head of state very isolated. He cannot snarl at Putin, US President Donald Trump, French President Emmanuel Macron and von der Leyen all at once. Hubris has its limits and Erdogan is beginning to look slightly ridiculous on the international stage. The Turks, who are a proud people, hardly relish the sight of their president making a fool of himself on the international stage and Erdogan's bark is increasingly worse than his bite.'


 

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