Things Canadian.

All the legal cannabis operations that I have heard about are growing in greenhouses or other indoor operations. Some are thinking about growing outdoors, but that's as far as they've gone. Whether indoor or outdoor, the regulations require security which make things not so simple as just bunging some plants into a field which used to grow tobacco.

While we are on this topic, the community colleges are now offering programs in cannabis cultivation. You too can become a qualified pot grower. Here's some examples from Loyalist, Niagara, and Durham.
LOYALIST COLLEGE INTRODUCES CANADA’S FIRST CANNABIS APPLIED SCIENCE PROGRAM : Loyalist College


Commercial Cannabis Production Program | Niagara College


NEW! Cannabis Industry Specialization Program | Durham College
Not reading all the posts but we do know that the country , growing more high quality pot , blow, maragiwana is in , the world...




The UK.



Speaking today to a Canadian couple, just moved to Europe last month, son still in Canada. They are quite scared as it’s now legal, yes there have been adverts, like drink and drive you die, smoke weed and drive you die . But at the end of the day it is a different kind of high I guess, never had weed in my life.
 
An excellent Remembrance Day parade then service I attended in Oshawa that was put on by the Ontario Regiment (RCAC). I didn’t take photos because it didn’t feel right, but found this video. If you enjoy armour and military vehicles of different eras, skip to 4:10 unless you like shïte pipe bands.
 
An excellent Remembrance Day parade then service I attended in Oshawa that was put on by the Ontario Regiment (RCAC). I didn’t take photos because it didn’t feel right, but found this video. If you enjoy armour and military vehicles of different eras, skip to 4:10 unless you like shïte pipe bands.
Agreed that that's a pretty poor pipe band, but to be honest, most Legion pipe bands are not known for their talent and ability.
 
Agreed that that's a pretty poor pipe band, but to be honest, most Legion pipe bands are not known for their talent and ability.
I was just surprised with the significance of the event with all that hardware, they didn’t get a better band, after all, even the QYRANG have P&D’s now....
 
I was just surprised with the significance of the event with all that hardware, they didn’t get a better band, after all, even the QYRANG have P&D’s now....
Yeah, you'd think that Durham Police PB would've been in Oshawa, but there you go.
 
Unless they're in your face SJW type screamers I can't see any normal person just there to do their job wanting to be labeled.

No doubt some dim pollie got an attaboy from the demonstrative ones and some serious curtailment of future votes from the rest.
It's all part and parcel of our government seemingly issuing an "apology" about once every six hours for the past 3 years.
 
Unless they're in your face SJW type screamers I can't see any normal person just there to do their job wanting to be labeled.

No doubt some dim pollie got an attaboy from the demonstrative ones and some serious curtailment of future votes from the rest.
From the announcement it seems to be connected to a settlement of a lawsuit over some sort of past "systemic discrimination" against alphabet soup types in the civil service, armed forces and RCMP. The latter two in particular have a reputation of not being very broad minded in regards to things like this in their ranks.

It seems to be a case of "here's your settlement cheque, and to show that we really care and have changed, here's a nice shiny pin to go with it, now fück off". Note that the legal settlement included "broad based reconciliation and memorialization measures in an amount not less than $15 million". I'm not sure how much the pins cost, but I suppose they are a small start on spending the $15 million as required.
 
And in the victimhood Olympics, Canada is striving for the gold, aka the Canada Pride Citation.

Government of Canada unveils the Canada Pride Citation – The Maple Leaf
Are there any grown-ups in charge in Canada these days, Gun Brickie? :? What a pointless exercise and a pointless decoration. Give the LBTQ + etc. crowd their Gay Pride Day and parade; march in it too if you want to appear clownish and down with the luvvies and all the "modern" right thinking on social media. Don't add to the circus atmosphere by giving them a decoration to wear on their string vests because they may have been subject to anti-gay discrimination in the past.
 
Are there any grown-ups in charge in Canada these days, Gun Brickie? :? What a pointless exercise and a pointless decoration. Give the LBTQ + etc. crowd their Gay Pride Day and parade; march in it too if you want to appear clownish and down with the luvvies and all the "modern" right thinking on social media. Don't add to the circus atmosphere by giving them a decoration to wear on their string vests because they may have been subject to anti-gay discrimination in the past.
The thing you are missing, is most Canadians really don’t give a shît if an apology and pin is given or not. If it makes certain segments of society happy to show acknowledgement of past discrimination, who cares? Btw, kinda ironic an American asking if there are any grown-ups in charge of Canada, might want look at your own country and ask the same question....
 
The thing you are missing, is most Canadians really don’t give a shît if an apology and pin is given or not. If it makes certain segments of society happy to show acknowledgement of past discrimination, who cares? Btw, kinda ironic an American asking if there are any grown-ups in charge of Canada, might want look at your own country and ask the same question....
Note in my previous post it is stated that the pin appears to be part of the legal settlement. The apology was also part of the court ordered terms. Neither of these were apparently done just because someone in the PMO thought they might be a good idea.

I did a bit of googling and found the legal documents. http://www.classaction.deloitte.ca/en-ca/Documents/Settlement Agreement.pdf
Here's the settlement terms as laid down by the court:
The Plaintiffs and the Defendant (together, the “Parties”) recognize and acknowledge that the historical policies and practices described below had harmful effects on the class members and that they are not consistent with the values and principles that are now embodied in the Canadian and Quebec Charters of Rights and Freedoms and the Canadian Human Rights Act. The Parties wish to enter into a settlement to:
  1. provide recognition of the harm suffered by, and a meaningful personal apology to, Class Members who faced threat of sanction or were more directly affected by the Defendant’s policies while serving in the CAF, RCMP or while employed in the FPS;
  2. provide compensation to those who suffered direct negative effects of the application of the officially sanctioned policies; and to
  3. provide funding for individual and collective Reconciliation and Memorialization Measures that will record and memorialize these historic events in order to educate and prevent future discrimination, which it is hoped will lead to reconciliation with the LGBTQ2 community;
Note the apology required under point #1, and the "Memorialization Measures" (which the pins form part of) under point #3.

The background is that apparently the RCMP, armed forces, and federal civil service went on a hunt for homosexuals (or whatever they want to be called these days) to purge them from their ranks between the mid 1950s and early 1990s. Note that this continued even after the legalization of homosexuality in 1969.

Here's an example of what that process included:
An extraordinary class action | Canadian Lawyer Mag
Diane Pitre suffered not only ongoing surveillance and questioning by the SIU while at CFB Chatham in New Brunswick and CFB Borden in Ontario but was subjected to months of psychiatric evaluations. Pitre describes being 18 and undergoing her first SIU interrogation at a mysterious Halifax location in 1977: “This was like 10 o’clock at night and it lasted way into the morning and then they drove me to the base, dropped me off in a psych ward, then they picked me up in the morning. And they did that for two, three days: investigation, lie detector tests, psych ward, then back to my base.” The two SIU operatives continuously asked her highly personal questions: Who is the man in the relationship? Do you like to masturbate in front of a mirror? Who takes the garbage out? Do you use a dildo? Do you hate men?

As word got out on the base about the investigation, the obscene phone calls and name-calling started. Pitre was sexually assaulted by a drunken male corporal, who was never brought to bear for the crime. It became too much, and on Sept. 24, 1980, she was forced to quit. The harassment was so severe she and her partner left town.
 
Note in my previous post it is stated that the pin appears to be part of the legal settlement. The apology was also part of the court ordered terms. Neither of these were apparently done just because someone in the PMO thought they might be a good idea.

I did a bit of googling and found the legal documents. http://www.classaction.deloitte.ca/en-ca/Documents/Settlement Agreement.pdf
Here's the settlement terms as laid down by the court:


Note the apology required under point #1, and the "Memorialization Measures" (which the pins form part of) under point #3.

The background is that apparently the RCMP, armed forces, and federal civil service went on a hunt for homosexuals (or whatever they want to be called these days) to purge them from their ranks between the mid 1950s and early 1990s. Note that this continued even after the legalization of homosexuality in 1969.

Here's an example of what that process included:
An extraordinary class action | Canadian Lawyer Mag
I fully understand what you wrote, my point is that most Canadians don’t care unless something directly involves them ie; the lawsuits. I think in general that the discrimination issues that the CF had involving purges was at the discretion of middle leadership. I know personally of an RCN matelot who was found to enjoy the company of other men was given a choice of discharge or remuster into the army. He ended his career as an army MWO after 30 years in. A lot of it came down to luck it seems.
 
Note in my previous post it is stated that the pin appears to be part of the legal settlement. The apology was also part of the court ordered terms. Neither of these were apparently done just because someone in the PMO thought they might be a good idea.

I did a bit of googling and found the legal documents. http://www.classaction.deloitte.ca/en-ca/Documents/Settlement Agreement.pdf
Here's the settlement terms as laid down by the court:


Note the apology required under point #1, and the "Memorialization Measures" (which the pins form part of) under point #3.

The background is that apparently the RCMP, armed forces, and federal civil service went on a hunt for homosexuals (or whatever they want to be called these days) to purge them from their ranks between the mid 1950s and early 1990s. Note that this continued even after the legalization of homosexuality in 1969.

Here's an example of what that process included:
An extraordinary class action | Canadian Lawyer Mag
Thanks for that.
 
I fully understand what you wrote, my point is that most Canadians don’t care unless something directly involves them ie; the lawsuits. I think in general that the discrimination issues that the CF had involving purges was at the discretion of middle leadership. I know personally of an RCN matelot who was found to enjoy the company of other men was given a choice of discharge or remuster into the army. He ended his career as an army MWO after 30 years in. A lot of it came down to luck it seems.
Basically yes I agree, nobody cares. It's a non-story and just represents a small part of a court settlement of a case that the government had no hope of winning. It's not a "sign of the times" in terms of the government waking up one day and deciding they need to issue medals for being gay.

I hadn't even heard of this until it was posted here I doubt that most Canadians will ever hear of it or remember it if they did.
 
Basically yes I agree, nobody cares. It's a non-story and just represents a small part of a court settlement of a case that the government had no hope of winning. It's not a "sign of the times" in terms of the government waking up one day and deciding they need to issue medals for being gay.

I hadn't even heard of this until it was posted here I doubt that most Canadians will ever hear of it or remember it if they did.
That is at the core of what appeals to me about Canada, people generally don’t get up in arms about things that doesn’t involve them or effect them. The people actually make an effort to be reasonable with each other and are usually willing to compromise for the common good. The one exception is the french, they are an anomaly....
 
That is at the core of what appeals to me about Canada, people generally don’t get up in arms about things that doesn’t involve them or effect them. The people actually make an effort to be reasonable with each other and are usually willing to compromise for the common good. The one exception is the french, they are an anomaly....

And I blame the English for the mess that is Quebec. If they had just stamped out French language and culture after the Plains of Abraham a world of trouble would have been avoided. I mean they had no problem destroying the Scottish Clan system after Culloden.
 
That is at the core of what appeals to me about Canada, people generally don’t get up in arms about things that doesn’t involve them or effect them. The people actually make an effort to be reasonable with each other and are usually willing to compromise for the common good. The one exception is the french, they are an anomaly....

Even the French hate French Canadians, that is all anybody needs to know.

This canuck comic talks about them.

 

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