Things Canadian.

Much of rural Ontario doesn’t have that option, no fibre optic cables running by my place, there’s not even a gas line.

We’re not really that far from the nearest town, it’s only about a 10 minute drive. The fibre installation was interesting though. There were two different companies trying to sign up customers and the second one assured us that they were the only ones who had the contract with the township to install the cables; that was a load of crap. We went with the first, a local farmer who was tired of the slow internet access and decided to start his own company to provide service for himself and his neighbours. He was honest from the start and has provided great service with prices a lot lower than the opposition, a huge national company. Sometimes it just takes one person to get things moving.
 
Which might lead some to think that a type of radio communication system might temporarily fill the gap.
That’s what l have now, my receiver picks up a signal broadcast from a tower but there are 2 large pitfalls. The first is the more customers using it a the same time, the poorer the speed. The second is the signal itself being blocked by trees, had my provider out checking the signal strength and it was only one bar out of 5, nobody wants their trees chopped or trimmed and you can’t force them. At this point my internet quality is about the same as it was with dial up.
 
That’s what l have now, my receiver picks up a signal broadcast from a tower but there are 2 large pitfalls. The first is the more customers using it a the same time, the poorer the speed. The second is the signal itself being blocked by trees, had my provider out checking the signal strength and it was only one bar out of 5, nobody wants their trees chopped or trimmed and you can’t force them. At this point my internet quality is about the same as it was with dial up.

How much are you paying for what you have now?
 
How much are you paying for what you have now?
I pay 64.00 Cdn for unlimited usage which is pretty pointless, to upload photos on here for example l use my mobile data then switch back to wifi to write.

To backtrack to about not having fibre optic, l have inquired many times over the years about why it’s not available and it’s always the same response, not worth the capital investment. The province has a program to enhance rural internet that is just beginning and l am hoping my concession will be on the list, but at this point whether or not that comes to fruition only time will tell.
 
I pay 64.00 Cdn for unlimited usage which is pretty pointless, to upload photos on here for example l use my mobile data then switch back to wifi to write.

To backtrack to about not having fibre optic, l have inquired many times over the years about why it’s not available and it’s always the same response, not worth the capital investment. The province has a program to enhance rural internet that is just beginning and l am hoping my concession will be on the list, but at this point whether or not that comes to fruition only time will tell.

There is money to be made in the rural areas and no mistake. The big cable companies around here such as Comcast wanted nothing to do with rural internet, now they are finding that people in the small towns who aren't so rural have switched to Fiber Optic because it's cheaper than the large cable companies.

The cable companies tried to throttle fiber optic in the idea stage when the local utility company put out feelers as to who would be interested in having it. The positive feedback they got scared the cable companies and so they took it to court citing some obscure rules.

The courts told them to do one and the rest as is said is history.
 
We’re not really that far from the nearest town, it’s only about a 10 minute drive. The fibre installation was interesting though. There were two different companies trying to sign up customers and the second one assured us that they were the only ones who had the contract with the township to install the cables; that was a load of crap. We went with the first, a local farmer who was tired of the slow internet access and decided to start his own company to provide service for himself and his neighbours. He was honest from the start and has provided great service with prices a lot lower than the opposition, a huge national company. Sometimes it just takes one person to get things moving.
There’s a couple of service providers in the towns local to me but neither wants to invest the money to run cable outside the towns limits, they say it’s not worth it. One thing l used to be able to do was go to the library and sign out one of the Bell Hubs for a week at a time, once covid started they stopped lending them out because their employees started using them for remote work. Looked into getting one and it was over 200.00 a month as the fee’s vary depending where you live it seems.
 
That’s what l have now, my receiver picks up a signal broadcast from a tower but there are 2 large pitfalls. The first is the more customers using it a the same time, the poorer the speed. The second is the signal itself being blocked by trees, had my provider out checking the signal strength and it was only one bar out of 5, nobody wants their trees chopped or trimmed and you can’t force them. At this point my internet quality is about the same as it was with dial up.

We had exactly the same issues with signal strength and trees, plus the towers were having problems in bad weather. We’re paying $100 for 100 megabytes. It’s a bit more than we were paying, but the speed is miraculous in comparison.
 
There is money to be made in the rural areas and no mistake. The big cable companies around here such as Comcast wanted nothing to do with rural internet, now they are finding that people in the small towns who aren't so rural have switched to Fiber Optic because it's cheaper than the large cable companies.

The cable companies tried to throttle fiber optic in the idea stage when the local utility company put out feelers as to who would be interested in having it. The positive feedback they got scared the cable companies and so they took it to court citing some obscure rules.

The courts told them to do one and the rest as is said is history.
The US market is something Canadian’s envy though, all our telecommunications and such are pathetic when it comes to pricing, it’s almost a monopoly. If l want television l have only 2 choices, Bell or Shaw satellite, both are over a 100.00 per month for a semi basic package.
 
The only reason I see for that is that the companies don't want to invest in bringing fiber optic to your part of the world. We had Hughes net satellite internet for years and while it did what I needed it to do it was no good for streaming video and such and was very prone to outages if the weather was crap.

Our local utility company teamed up with an internet company from somewhere else in the country and brought fiber optic to the rural community. Hell I wasn't even a customer and we had no phone poles up our way but that didn't stop them.

The installed poles right up to our property, installed a small box outside the house and we have now had fiber optic for three or four weeks now and man what a huge difference. Satellite internet would take forever to download a large file, fiber optic took about just over a minute or so to download a 4.5gb file.

Cost to us for the internet and for home phone is $99 US a month.
Top tip. When youve been with the co. awhile, tell them you’re getting offers from other companies. I got our internet, cells etc and TV down to C$80 a month that way.
 
Top tip. When youve been with the co. awhile, tell them you’re getting offers from other companies. I got our internet, cells etc and TV down to C$80 a month that way.

Oh yeah I understand that. However when it came to choosing between satellite internet and fiber optic it was a no brainer speed wise.
 
Top tip. When youve been with the co. awhile, tell them you’re getting offers from other companies. I got our internet, cells etc and TV down to C$80 a month that way.
That’s only relative to where you live and if there are options, l tried that with Shaw and was told ok, was nice having you as a customer, bye.
 
That’s only relative to where you live and if there are options, l tried that with Shaw and was told ok, was nice having you as a customer, bye.

True. We’re 20 minutes out of town but its a 200-lot estate with Shaw, Bell and Telus all vying for our business. We’ve got Telus fiber optic and its pretty good.
 
Is Bell private or state owned and does it have a monopoly on providing telecom services?
Bell is one of multiple private companies, and the biggest. They tend to be regionally based because of the nature of infrastructure. The company was founded by Alexander Graham Bell, but had a separate corporate ownership than the Bell company in the US (foreign ownership of critical industries such as telecoms is not allowed in Canada).

The "world's first long distance phone call" by the way was made in southwestern Ontario near the town of Paris (which is near Brantford). Bell went home to his parent's farm to visit for Christmas and showed them what he was working on by stringing up some wire (I assume fence wire) from their farm house to a hardware store in Paris and made a phone call. This tit bit isn't all that relevant to the topic, but I thought some people would find it interesting.

To get back to the main topic, there are multiple different Internet Service Providers (ISPs) in Canada. They are allowed to use the infrastructure of the phone and cable companies at regulated rates (regulation is a complex subject which I will leave aside here). You might get your phone service from Bell, your television cable service from Rogers, and your ISP service from someone else operating over either Bell or Rogers cables. The big providers however tend to offer package deals for land line phone, Internet, cable TV (over fiber or satellite if they don't have coax cables), and mobile phone all for one rate which can be cheaper than buying them all separately.

Some of the larger independent ISPs (that is, ones who aren't part of a traditional telecom company) are putting in their own fibre optic infrastructure. If you live in a large city you may have dozens of ISPs to choose from.

The problem in rural areas, and I'm talking about farms or isolated houses, not small towns, is that the installed infrastructure may not support high speed Internet. They may have just phone lines and no coax cable, and the distance to wherever the phone lines hook into may be too far to support high speed DSL.

Bell's plans for rural high speed Internet revolve around 5G wireless, and I believe the same is true for at least some other companies as well. This form of 5G is different from just tethering your phone to your PC. They have a technician come around and install an antenna on the roof of your house and then install some sort of box to receive the signal. Speeds are either 25 mbps or 50 mbps, accounts vary.

Bell bought spectrum specifically for this service and are already installing it. They are currently ahead of schedule due to accelerating plans in reaction to pandemic planning for working from home.

Rogers (cable) are supposedly doing something similar, but are a bit more vague in their press releases on the issue.

This use of 5G has been in the works for years, so companies have not wanted to put in wire infrastructure when plans all revolved around wireless. I imagine that US attempts to use diplomatic pressure to wrestle control of the 5G market from Chinese companies in favour of American ones may have slowed things down a bit, but I don't know to what extent.
 
Bell is one of multiple private companies, and the biggest. They tend to be regionally based because of the nature of infrastructure. The company was founded by Alexander Graham Bell, but had a separate corporate ownership than the Bell company in the US (foreign ownership of critical industries such as telecoms is not allowed in Canada).

The "world's first long distance phone call" by the way was made in southwestern Ontario near the town of Paris (which is near Brantford). Bell went home to his parent's farm to visit for Christmas and showed them what he was working on by stringing up some wire (I assume fence wire) from their farm house to a hardware store in Paris and made a phone call. This tit bit isn't all that relevant to the topic, but I thought some people would find it interesting.

To get back to the main topic, there are multiple different Internet Service Providers (ISPs) in Canada. They are allowed to use the infrastructure of the phone and cable companies at regulated rates (regulation is a complex subject which I will leave aside here). You might get your phone service from Bell, your television cable service from Rogers, and your ISP service from someone else operating over either Bell or Rogers cables. The big providers however tend to offer package deals for land line phone, Internet, cable TV (over fiber or satellite if they don't have coax cables), and mobile phone all for one rate which can be cheaper than buying them all separately.

Some of the larger independent ISPs (that is, ones who aren't part of a traditional telecom company) are putting in their own fibre optic infrastructure. If you live in a large city you may have dozens of ISPs to choose from.

The problem in rural areas, and I'm talking about farms or isolated houses, not small towns, is that the installed infrastructure may not support high speed Internet. They may have just phone lines and no coax cable, and the distance to wherever the phone lines hook into may be too far to support high speed DSL.

Bell's plans for rural high speed Internet revolve around 5G wireless, and I believe the same is true for at least some other companies as well. This form of 5G is different from just tethering your phone to your PC. They have a technician come around and install an antenna on the roof of your house and then install some sort of box to receive the signal. Speeds are either 25 mbps or 50 mbps, accounts vary.

Bell bought spectrum specifically for this service and are already installing it. They are currently ahead of schedule due to accelerating plans in reaction to pandemic planning for working from home.

Rogers (cable) are supposedly doing something similar, but are a bit more vague in their press releases on the issue.

This use of 5G has been in the works for years, so companies have not wanted to put in wire infrastructure when plans all revolved around wireless. I imagine that US attempts to use diplomatic pressure to wrestle control of the 5G market from Chinese companies in favour of American ones may have slowed things down a bit, but I don't know to what extent.
Thanks for the clarification:) I can see how the problems occur we too have multiple ISPs providing services over common networks as well as others installing their own. They talk about 5G coverage here as well to fill in the gaps when it’s not economic to install fixed lines, sounds good but we can barely get a single bar of 4G in our village and have to stand in the garden to make calls.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
FAJuI27WUAEC75d.jpg
 
Green Leader has crashed. No not that Green Leader, I'm talking about the head of the Green Party in Canada.
Annamie Paul is stepping down as Green Party leader

Annamie Paul has resigned as head of the party. This isn't a huge surprise as the party went into self-destruct mode during the summer and so was in poor shape to contest the election.

Paul herself didn't win a seat, coming in well behind in the riding she contested in Toronto. The party's vote overall dropped by roughly two thirds, from 6.5 per cent to 2.9 per cent, coming in behind the People's Party.

The party itself was nearly bankrupt before the election started and the board refused to provide funds for their leader to campaign.

I won't go into all the wretched details, but the underlying problem was that the party has split into two factions. One faction, led by Paul want to become more mainstream while maintaining an environmental focus.

The other faction on the other hand want to adopt every lost fringe cause out there, without much concern as to whether it has a connection with the environment, or any relevance to the electorate either it seems.

The radical faction appear to have gained control of the party executive and have been trying to undermine and get rid of Paul for months. They appear to have succeeded, although whether the party will survive in any meaningful way is yet to be seen.

If Annamie Paul returns to politics at all, I won't be surprised if she comes back as a Liberal or NDP member.
 
Enbridge Line 3 oil pipeline is completed, and will go into operation on the 1st of October.
Enbridge's controversial Line 3 pipeline project 'substantially complete,' will be in service Oct. 1
This runs from Alberta and goes 1,765 km to Enbridge's terminal in Superior Wisconsin, from where it is distributed to the middle part of the US.

This adds 370,000 barrels per day of export capacity. It is a replacement of an older pipeline which as well as wearing out had lower capacity due to having to run at a lower pressure.

Overall this is good news as it will help producers in Alberta to get better prices for their oil.

This is one of the important pipeline projects which needed to get done.

The TransMountain Pipeline expansion which runs from Alberta to the coast of BC is expected to be be in service by the end of next year and will add another 590,000 barrels per day taking that pipeline to 890,000 barrels per day. That will be oil that can access world markets, giving producers more access to overseas markets.
 

clothears

War Hero
Green Leader has crashed. No not that Green Leader, I'm talking about the head of the Green Party in Canada.
Annamie Paul is stepping down as Green Party leader

Annamie Paul has resigned as head of the party. This isn't a huge surprise as the party went into self-destruct mode during the summer and so was in poor shape to contest the election.

Paul herself didn't win a seat, coming in well behind in the riding she contested in Toronto. The party's vote overall dropped by roughly two thirds, from 6.5 per cent to 2.9 per cent, coming in behind the People's Party.

The party itself was nearly bankrupt before the election started and the board refused to provide funds for their leader to campaign.

I won't go into all the wretched details, but the underlying problem was that the party has split into two factions. One faction, led by Paul want to become more mainstream while maintaining an environmental focus.

The other faction on the other hand want to adopt every lost fringe cause out there, without much concern as to whether it has a connection with the environment, or any relevance to the electorate either it seems.

The radical faction appear to have gained control of the party executive and have been trying to undermine and get rid of Paul for months. They appear to have succeeded, although whether the party will survive in any meaningful way is yet to be seen.

If Annamie Paul returns to politics at all, I won't be surprised if she comes back as a Liberal or NDP member.
I don't really think Paul was serious about the party.

There I said it. She ran and lost how many times in Toronto?

If I was a party leader who couldn't get elected in Toronto, I'd ask for a safe seat to run in. Just like Singh did.

But now, it was all down to racism and anti-semitism. Until she said it, I never knew she was Jewish. I just knew she was a lame duck in Toronto with horrible taste in clothes.
 

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