Things Canadian.

Here's the CBC results. The page updates itself a couple of times a minute, so you can leave that open and it will give you a live count.

Federal election results

At the time of posting the Liberals are leading in 23 seats, the Conservatives in 8 and the NDP in 1.

Don't try to project those results across the country though, as there are significant regional variances and the polls have only just closed in the eastern 2 time zones (Newfoundland and the Maritimes).

If the election is close we may not know who got the most seats until tomorrow.
 
At 22:14 the results so far are:

Liberals : 111
Conservatives : 54
Bloc Quebecois : 22
NDP : 14
Green : 1
People's Party : 0

These are for elected or leading. Don't take the numbers too literally as only a handful of polls are reporting yet in ridings outside of the Maritimes and Newfoundland. The Conservatives are actually doing well as they seem to have picked up a few seats in the Atlantic provinces.

The big news will come in a few hours when enough polls report in ridings in Ontario and Quebec to give us a good idea of which way things will go.

The election will probably be decided in the Toronto region where there are enough ridings which have a history of voting either way to make a difference.
 
At 00:15 Tuesday the CBC are projecting a Liberal minority. The results so far are (elected and leading):

Liberals : 156
Conservatives : 122
Bloc Quebecois : 30
NDP : 28
Green : 2
People's Party : 0

170 seats are required for a majority. Roughly three quarters of polls have reported.

Trudeau and O'Toole are elected in their seats. Singh (NDP) is standing in Burnaby South (Vancouver) and with half the polls reporting he is about 950 votes ahead. That's not a big margin, but it may be enough.
 
What, 610 million spent so we are in exactly the same spot we where before the election that Justin said wasn’t going to happen during the pandemic isn’t great leadership in your eyes?
It's fitting that he spent all that money to stroke his ego, as the man's a complete stroker to begin with.
 
I'm ******* done. The only thing left for the West to do is leave.
Let the assholes in the Toronto-Montreal corridor pay the bills.
Don't tar us all with the same brush. I'm stuck in the centre of the Toronto/Ottawa/Montreal corridor. I'd much rather that those hellholes leave.
 
Can't see him kneeling for BLM, Dutch Christian Reformists aren't exactly known for embracing diversity.... This cùnt has only spoken to me about 7 times in the 15 years they've lived there, first time was to tell me l shouldn't be cutting grass or doing fieldwork on Sundays, not sure why we aren't best mates...
He's right.
Sunday's are for roast lunches , followed by booze in front of the telly watching rugby. Mow the lawn ? You're having a larf.
 
The standings as of 10:15 are:

Liberal : 158 (elected in 146, leading in 12)
Conservative : 119 (elected in 116, leading in 3)
Bloc Quebecois : 34 (elected in 32, leading in 2)
NDP : 25 (elected in 24, leading in 1)
Green : 2 (elected in 2)
People's Party : 0

The overall result is pretty close to where things stood at dissolution. 170 seats are needed for a majority.

Green Party leader Anamie Paul failed to win a seat for herself, coming in fourth in her riding. Former leader Elizabeth May won her seat in coastal BC again. Their second seat in the KW area (near Toronto) probably came about as a result of the Liberal candidate having to drop out before the vote.

The People's Party didn't win any seats.

I'll leave any detailed analysis of numbers until such time as the final results are in.
 
Overall the results are pretty close to where they were after the last election, with a few seats changing hands here and there.

The government started the election with a big lead in the popularity polls, enough for a solid majority if that translated into votes. This was probably mainly due to to their handling of the pandemic, which the public saw as being better than most other comparable countries, particularly the US (admittedly the latter is a pretty low bar). The death rate was held to much less than that seen in most of Europe or in the US. The vaccination program went pretty well.

However calling a vote early without a solid reason usually results in the government getting punished at the polls. I suspect that Trudeau decided to take the risk however because the then state of the polls were probably about as good as he could expect and there would be risk involved in allowing the opposition to pick their moment to pull the plug on an issue of their choosing.

Trudeau lost that gamble and ended up where he started. He is also now not in a good position to call another election should a good issue of his choosing come in the near future. On the other hand, the opposition aren't likely to pull the plug on him for the next while either.


The Conservatives started off the election well behind in the polls, where they had been for some time as the pandemic sucked all of the political oxygen out of the room. Once into the election though support rose back up to where it had been previously, and this was sustained. They may end up with a higher percentage of the popular vote than the Liberals but fewer seats due to the way much of that extra vote is concentrated in a minority of ridings which they win heavily.

O'Toole is in my opinion probably the sort of leader the Conservatives need to be able to win in the 905 region (the area around Toronto), which is where they need to win if they want to form government. He seems fairly competent and is willing to take a moderate stance on most issues, which is what is needed to win seats outside of their traditional base.

O'Toole became party leader during the course of the pandemic and demonstrated good tactical sense in terms of understanding where the votes were that he needed to win, eventually overcoming the original front runner Peter Mackay. On the other hand he also demonstrated his willingness to placate the nutters in the party rather than confront them directly, and this is a factor which may work against him in a general election as opposed to a party leadership race.

A number of factors probably went into the final results, but one of the factors which probably hurt the Conservatives was how Alberta and Saskatchewan have been handling the fourth wave of the pandemic. East of the prairies it hasn't been a big deal. In Alberta and Saskatchewan however it has been a slow motion train crash all through the latter half of the summer and up to the current day, with the lowest vaccination rates in the country combined with governments who have their heads stuck firmly in the sand with respect to using public health measures to control it (Kenney's "best summer ever" PR campaign being a case in point).

The Liberals were quite happy to use this as a stick to beat O'Toole with as the latter had said vaguely nice things about the two provincial premiers (Kenney and his mini-me Moe) while the government in Ottawa had before the election been increasingly critical about the direction being taken there.

Things came to a head in the past week or so with Kenney and Moe having to hop on their reverso-cycles in terms of policy and fall into line with the rest of the provinces while begging for help from the rest of the country.

My opinion is that the above factor likely influenced a great many people in the rest of the country to feel that a change of government in Ottawa would be risky at the present time and that the safest thing to do was to vote the same way they did the last time.
 
Overall the results are pretty close to where they were after the last election, with a few seats changing hands here and there.

The government started the election with a big lead in the popularity polls, enough for a solid majority if that translated into votes. This was probably mainly due to to their handling of the pandemic, which the public saw as being better than most other comparable countries, particularly the US (admittedly the latter is a pretty low bar). The death rate was held to much less than that seen in most of Europe or in the US. The vaccination program went pretty well.

However calling a vote early without a solid reason usually results in the government getting punished at the polls. I suspect that Trudeau decided to take the risk however because the then state of the polls were probably about as good as he could expect and there would be risk involved in allowing the opposition to pick their moment to pull the plug on an issue of their choosing.

Trudeau lost that gamble and ended up where he started. He is also now not in a good position to call another election should a good issue of his choosing come in the near future. On the other hand, the opposition aren't likely to pull the plug on him for the next while either.


The Conservatives started off the election well behind in the polls, where they had been for some time as the pandemic sucked all of the political oxygen out of the room. Once into the election though support rose back up to where it had been previously, and this was sustained. They may end up with a higher percentage of the popular vote than the Liberals but fewer seats due to the way much of that extra vote is concentrated in a minority of ridings which they win heavily.

O'Toole is in my opinion probably the sort of leader the Conservatives need to be able to win in the 905 region (the area around Toronto), which is where they need to win if they want to form government. He seems fairly competent and is willing to take a moderate stance on most issues, which is what is needed to win seats outside of their traditional base.

O'Toole became party leader during the course of the pandemic and demonstrated good tactical sense in terms of understanding where the votes were that he needed to win, eventually overcoming the original front runner Peter Mackay. On the other hand he also demonstrated his willingness to placate the nutters in the party rather than confront them directly, and this is a factor which may work against him in a general election as opposed to a party leadership race.

A number of factors probably went into the final results, but one of the factors which probably hurt the Conservatives was how Alberta and Saskatchewan have been handling the fourth wave of the pandemic. East of the prairies it hasn't been a big deal. In Alberta and Saskatchewan however it has been a slow motion train crash all through the latter half of the summer and up to the current day, with the lowest vaccination rates in the country combined with governments who have their heads stuck firmly in the sand with respect to using public health measures to control it (Kenney's "best summer ever" PR campaign being a case in point).

The Liberals were quite happy to use this as a stick to beat O'Toole with as the latter had said vaguely nice things about the two provincial premiers (Kenney and his mini-me Moe) while the government in Ottawa had before the election been increasingly critical about the direction being taken there.

Things came to a head in the past week or so with Kenney and Moe having to hop on their reverso-cycles in terms of policy and fall into line with the rest of the provinces while begging for help from the rest of the country.

My opinion is that the above factor likely influenced a great many people in the rest of the country to feel that a change of government in Ottawa would be risky at the present time and that the safest thing to do was to vote the same way they did the last time.
No matter how it's spun, the election was unnecessary and a waste of time and money. Playing with taxpayers money for political gain is not just a liberal thing, but in this case it was completely and utterly ridiculous and shows justin for exactly what he is and how his personal agenda is a higher priority than the good of the Canadian people.
 

RABC

LE
No matter how it's spun, the election was unnecessary and a waste of time and money. Playing with taxpayers money for political gain is not just a liberal thing, but in this case it was completely and utterly ridiculous and shows justin for exactly what he is and how his personal agenda is a higher priority than the good of the Canadian people.


I see the Equality Minister who referred to the Taliban as “brothers” has lost her seat.
 
No matter how it's spun, the election was unnecessary and a waste of time and money. Playing with taxpayers money for political gain is not just a liberal thing, but in this case it was completely and utterly ridiculous and shows justin for exactly what he is and how his personal agenda is a higher priority than the good of the Canadian people.
That of course is why he didn't get his majority despite riding high in the polls prior to the election call.
 
Watched a little of the CBC election Night coverage on CSPAN and was interested to note that the Conservative and the NDP candidates who thanked their supporters for turning out spoke their speeches in both French and English. The National Banner was prominently displayed on the stage that each candidate spoke from. The Parti Quebecois candidate though spoke only in French (no effort was made to be bilingual) and the stage was festooned with Quebec provincial flags; not a Maple leaf banner was to be seen. Was that an error on the part of the French-Canadian candidate or are the French speakers always bloody minded about speaking English?
 
Watched a little of the CBC election Night coverage on CSPAN and was interested to note that the Conservative and the NDP candidates who thanked their supporters for turning out spoke their speeches in both French and English. The National Banner was prominently displayed on the stage that each candidate spoke from. The Parti Quebecois candidate though spoke only in French (no effort was made to be bilingual) and the stage was festooned with Quebec provincial flags; not a Maple leaf banner was to be seen. Was that an error on the part of the French-Canadian candidate or are the French speakers always bloody minded about speaking English?
Parti Québécois (PQ) are a provincial party and don't run in federal elections. You may have been watching the Bloc Québécois (BQ), who are a federal party.

The BQ are a nationalist and separatist party and so aren't interested in Canadian symbols or English. Since they want enough people to vote for them to actually get elected however they promise to not be too separatist if elected, but then lay on the Quebec nationalist act with a trowel. The current leader Yves-François Blanchet replaced the previous one Martine Ouellet a couple of years ago when a large block of their MPs rebelled over her plan to promote a separatist agenda. So the leader of the separatist party got hoofed when the party's MPs discovered to their horror that she was a separatist.

Their main appeal to most voters is a combination of their vaguely socialist platform and their promise to put the interests of Quebec first. They started off as a splinter group from the federal Conservatives during the Mulroney era (1980s) who broke off and formed their own party, originally motivated mainly over personalities and egos.

Quebecers are quite flexible in terms of their politics and will switch parties and policies according to what seems to be the flavour of the month. This year they felt "insulted" by one of the questions in the leadership debate (about a provincial law banning provincial civil servants from wearing religious symbols, seen as an anti-Muslim law) and the BQ are believed to have benefited from the backlash in Quebec over this.

The current governing party in the province are the CAQ (Coalition Avenir Québec) who are nationalist, sort of conservative, and against separatism. The religious symbols law they brought in is very popular in the province, but viewed as sort of discriminatory in the rest of the country. The government in Ottawa don't want to get involved in the issue as it would cost them seats so they try to avoid it.


Quebec politics may sound a bit odd with respect to nationalist and separatism, but I won't be surprised if Scottish politics eventually evolves in a similar direction.
 
Parti Québécois (PQ) are a provincial party and don't run in federal elections. You may have been watching the Bloc Québécois (BQ), who are a federal party.

The BQ are a nationalist and separatist party and so aren't interested in Canadian symbols or English. Since they want enough people to vote for them to actually get elected however they promise to not be too separatist if elected, but then lay on the Quebec nationalist act with a trowel. The current leader Yves-François Blanchet replaced the previous one Martine Ouellet a couple of years ago when a large block of their MPs rebelled over her plan to promote a separatist agenda. So the leader of the separatist party got hoofed when the party's MPs discovered to their horror that she was a separatist.

Their main appeal to most voters is a combination of their vaguely socialist platform and their promise to put the interests of Quebec first. They started off as a splinter group from the federal Conservatives during the Mulroney era (1980s) who broke off and formed their own party, originally motivated mainly over personalities and egos.

Quebecers are quite flexible in terms of their politics and will switch parties and policies according to what seems to be the flavour of the month. This year they felt "insulted" by one of the questions in the leadership debate (about a provincial law banning provincial civil servants from wearing religious symbols, seen as an anti-Muslim law) and the BQ are believed to have benefited from the backlash in Quebec over this.

The current governing party in the province are the CAQ (Coalition Avenir Québec) who are nationalist, sort of conservative, and against separatism. The religious symbols law they brought in is very popular in the province, but viewed as sort of discriminatory in the rest of the country. The government in Ottawa don't want to get involved in the issue as it would cost them seats so they try to avoid it.


Quebec politics may sound a bit odd with respect to nationalist and separatism, but I won't be surprised if Scottish politics eventually evolves in a similar direction.
The government has failed the nation by not getting involved in Quebec’s discriminatory practices, it’s cut and dry but Justin lacks the backbone to go against his frog brothers, he’s a pure hypocrite......
 
The government has failed the nation by not getting involved in Quebec’s discriminatory practices, it’s cut and dry but Justin lacks the backbone to go against his frog brothers, he’s a pure hypocrite......
Perhaps I'm evil, but I can't find anything within me which actually cares about the issue.
 
The UK, US, and Ukraine are among the countries which have sent their congratulations to Trudeau on winning the election.
Joe Biden, Boris Johnson congratulate Trudeau on third election victory

Johnson:
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson also saluted Trudeau on his third straight election victory.

"Congratulations [Justin Trudeau] on your re-election," Johnson said in a social media post today. "The U.K. and Canada are great friends and partners and I look forward to us working closely together in the years ahead."

The US:
"The President expressed to Prime Minister Trudeau his desire to continue working closely and deepening collaboration with Canada – one of our nation's top partners," the statement said.

Ukraine:
Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky also congratulated Trudeau on his victory and said he looks forward to stronger ties between the two countries.

The story mentions that one of the items on the agenda in dealing with the US is updating NORAD and the North Warning System. The expected cost is $11 billion, with Canada paying 40 per cent of the cost.
 

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