Things Canadian.

This video is more in depth and was to a Canadian audience 11 years ago. I thought she was very fair minded bearing in mind the anti colonial retoric in Universities in both North America and the UK. Her heritage is that she has an American father and Indian mother (from India, not first nation).

I look forward to watching it tomorrow and will comment when I've seen it.
 
There's a very good article at the link below on the Neutral Indians, including what we know about their culture and history, and what happened to them. It has some relevance to the above discussion.

The Neutral Indians were destroyed in the struggle for dominance by various Indian nations in the interior of the continent in the mid 17th century. Some of the descendents of the Iroquois who were involved in those wars were to later be settled on their former adversary's now vacant land in the late 18th century, having themselves been driven out from their own homes by the Americans. Whether or not that makes Iroquois "colonists" is a matter of semantics.

It is relevant to the video above in that many of the Loyalists were to be settled in this unpopulated space in what is now southern Ontario.

The Neutral Confederacy

Don't bother reading the Wikipedia article on the subject, it's utter garbage.
 
This video is more in depth and was to a Canadian audience 11 years ago. I thought she was very fair minded bearing in mind the anti colonial retoric in Universities in both North America and the UK. Her heritage is that she has an American father and Indian mother (from India, not first nation).

I've watched the second video and again I think she works too hard at forcing the history into fitting into her narrative of obstreperousness in the rest of the world being the product of the American revolution rather than it being a normal part of the human condition and primarily driven by local conditions. She also doesn't acknowledge that participation in political life was very restricted in Britain itself, and that this was not just a feature of the colonies. The post-revolutionary US itself wasn't what we would recognise as a genuine democracy either, as voting was restricted in many ways.

I do detect though that with respect to Canadian loyalists she seems to have focused on the Maritime colonies and appears to know much less about Upper Canada (Ontario). Her figures on Loyalist migration to Upper Canada are for the first wave who arrived via New Brunswick. There was however a continual migration of Loyalists out of the post-revolutionary US for years afterwards, many of whom went overland directly into Upper Canada. Some of these of course were not genuine Loyalists but rather just economic migrants looking for a better life for themselves. This didn't end until it was finally cut off by Canadian authorities, which if I recall correctly wasn't until after the War of 1812, as a consequence of the latter.

In my own opinion the loss of the American colonies had little relation to British imperial expansion in the rest of the world. Far more important in my opinion were the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars which caused Britain to drive the French and their allies out of many of their colonial positions around the world, from the Caribbean to South Africa, to India, and this is what was instrumental in leading Britain to its imperial heights.
 
I've watched the second video and again I think she works too hard at forcing the history into fitting into her narrative of obstreperousness in the rest of the world being the product of the American revolution rather than it being a normal part of the human condition and primarily driven by local conditions. She also doesn't acknowledge that participation in political life was very restricted in Britain itself, and that this was not just a feature of the colonies. The post-revolutionary US itself wasn't what we would recognise as a genuine democracy either, as voting was restricted in many ways.

I do detect though that with respect to Canadian loyalists she seems to have focused on the Maritime colonies and appears to know much less about Upper Canada (Ontario). Her figures on Loyalist migration to Upper Canada are for the first wave who arrived via New Brunswick. There was however a continual migration of Loyalists out of the post-revolutionary US for years afterwards, many of whom went overland directly into Upper Canada. Some of these of course were not genuine Loyalists but rather just economic migrants looking for a better life for themselves. This didn't end until it was finally cut off by Canadian authorities, which if I recall correctly wasn't until after the War of 1812, as a consequence of the latter.

In my own opinion the loss of the American colonies had little relation to British imperial expansion in the rest of the world. Far more important in my opinion were the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars which caused Britain to drive the French and their allies out of many of their colonial positions around the world, from the Caribbean to South Africa, to India, and this is what was instrumental in leading Britain to its imperial heights.
One video I watched on the war of 1812 which was a Canadian production said that New England had little interest in a war with Canada as they had such good and close trading relation's with them.
 
One video I watched on the war of 1812 which was a Canadian production said that New England had little interest in a war with Canada as they had such good and close trading relation's with them.
US opinion was split on the war. Some of this was simply down to geography.

The north eastern states did a lot of trade with Britain and British colonies and saw themselves as standing to lose a lot by the war and so to a large extent were opposed to it. Also geography didn't favour these states expanding into British controlled territory. Although they were the ones most directly adjacent to British territory, the terrain was impassible to an army or to commercial trade. The practical invasion routes were all in the interior via New York. The St. Lawrence River however gave Britain direct access to the interior, bypassing the Appalachian Mountains, the latter of which had long been a formidable barrier to colonial expansion when going directly from the Atlantic coast.

States and individuals who felt they stood to gain more from the conquest and annexation of Canada on the other hand were in favour of war. Many of the states to the south of New England were set on expansion into the interior and the conquest of Canada was intended to be part of that.

There was a third element which was ideological which cut across economic interest. That was a belief that the US and its ideology was the future of the world and the first step towards realising that was the conquest of British North America (BNA) and the expulsion of Britain from the continent. They of course were in favour of war. They also saw the existence of BNA as resolving unfinished business, in that the revolution wasn't truly done so long as Britain still controlled a substantial part of the continent (Britain still controlled more of North America in terms of actual territory than the US did, and that was to remain unchanged).

This ideological aspect grew into what was later known as "Manifest Destiny", which was the belief that God had ordained that the US were to rule all of North America, although that was sometimes phrased as "from the North Pole to the Equator". The so called "Monroe Doctrine" was version of this which was both watered down in the degree of control to be exercised while also being expanded in the area it encompassed. It was pure puffery as the US had no way of enforcing it and other countries simply ignored it.

If you want an analogy for the ideological element, think of the early 20th century Bolsheviks and their goal of of establishing the dictatorship of the proletariat throughout the world. Whether that was accomplished by means of global revolution or by the points of the Red Army's bayonets was all the same to them.
 
US opinion was split on the war. Some of this was simply down to geography.

The north eastern states did a lot of trade with Britain and British colonies and saw themselves as standing to lose a lot by the war and so to a large extent were opposed to it. Also geography didn't favour these states expanding into British controlled territory. Although they were the ones most directly adjacent to British territory, the terrain was impassible to an army or to commercial trade. The practical invasion routes were all in the interior via New York. The St. Lawrence River however gave Britain direct access to the interior, bypassing the Appalachian Mountains, the latter of which had long been a formidable barrier to colonial expansion when going directly from the Atlantic coast.

States and individuals who felt they stood to gain more from the conquest and annexation of Canada on the other hand were in favour of war. Many of the states to the south of New England were set on expansion into the interior and the conquest of Canada was intended to be part of that.

There was a third element which was ideological which cut across economic interest. That was a belief that the US and its ideology was the future of the world and the first step towards realising that was the conquest of British North America (BNA) and the expulsion of Britain from the continent. They of course were in favour of war. They also saw the existence of BNA as resolving unfinished business, in that the revolution wasn't truly done so long as Britain still controlled a substantial part of the continent (Britain still controlled more of North America in terms of actual territory than the US did, and that was to remain unchanged).

This ideological aspect grew into what was later known as "Manifest Destiny", which was the belief that God had ordained that the US were to rule all of North America, although that was sometimes phrased as "from the North Pole to the Equator". The so called "Monroe Doctrine" was version of this which was both watered down in the degree of control to be exercised while also being expanded in the area it encompassed. It was pure puffery as the US had no way of enforcing it and other countries simply ignored it.

If you want an analogy for the ideological element, think of the early 20th century Bolsheviks and their goal of of establishing the dictatorship of the proletariat throughout the world. Whether that was accomplished by means of global revolution or by the points of the Red Army's bayonets was all the same to them.
Well they got their Yankee arrses kicked for their troubles whitch ever way you look at it, getting their Capital burnt down after the Militia did a runner in front of British regulars in the Blaydon races.

In some ways it reminds me of Ireland with the 26 county Southern Ireland being the USA and the 6 county Northern Ireland being Canada after 1922.
 
Well they got their Yankee arrses kicked for their troubles whitch ever way you look at it, getting their Capital burnt down after the Militia did a runner in front of British regulars in the Blaydon races.

In some ways it reminds me of Ireland with the 26 county Southern Ireland being the USA and the 6 county Northern Ireland being Canada after 1922.
The Americans had no real hope of defeating Britain. Even in his famous letter laying out how he saw the war being fought Thomas Jefferson had to resort to hand waving when it came to figuring out what to do next after capturing Halifax in the second year of a two year campaign starting with Canada. Of course despite what should have been overwhelming numbers on their side the invasion repeatedly fell flat on its face at the border so they never really had to address that question.

Of course the War of 1812 was not a stand alone war, but rather was a minor campaign in the much larger Napoleonic Wars. Like in WWII the US were playing the role of Italy and their most realistic hope would have been for Napoleon to win the war for them after which they would pick up some tasty bits of territory in the peace negotiations. Also like in WWII, that hope died in the snows of Moscow.
 
Well they got their Yankee arrses kicked for their troubles whitch ever way you look at it, getting their Capital burnt down after the Militia did a runner in front of British regulars in the Blaydon races.

In some ways it reminds me of Ireland with the 26 county Southern Ireland being the USA and the 6 county Northern Ireland being Canada after 1922.

FNC
 
Haven't seen you post in a bit. I thought you might have been burned to a crisp in the fires. How are things going out that way?

Lots of fires out here. Nothing too near us but loads of smoke every day. Windows closed which overnight is a pity. Waterfall outside bedroom slider switched off as I cant hear it with windows closed.

Its hell out west I tells ya!
 
their most realistic hope would have been for Napoleon to win the war for them after which they would pick up some tasty bits of territory in the peace negotiations. Also like in WWII, that hope died in the snows of Moscow.
Waall, it worked once before when Napoleon sold us the Louisiana Territory in 1803 to gather more treasure for his wars. Can't fault the Yankees for deciding to have a flutter while you Brits were otherwise occupied. [Note that an "Indian" is leading the way guiding her white devils to the Pacific Coast and back safely. [pbuh] Anyway, you've got to admire the arrogance of the French emperor for selling the gullible Americans a piece of property that he didn't own. The Lakota Sioux, Cheyenne, Blackfeet, etc. had a better claim.)

Lewis and Clark Epedition 60.jpg
 
Who knew?

A new public holiday has been added to the calendar

.Public holidays for 2021
  • New Year - Friday, January 1, 2021
  • Good Friday - Friday, April 2, 2021
  • Easter Monday - Monday, April 5, 2021
  • Victoria Day - Monday, May 24, 2021
  • Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day - Thursday, June 24, 2021 (Quebec only)
  • Canada Day - Thursday, July 1, 2021
  • Civic Holiday - Monday, August 2, 2021
  • Labour Day - Monday, September 6, 2021
  • National Day for Truth and Reconciliation - Thursday, September 30, 2021
  • Thanksgiving Day - Monday, October 11, 2021
  • Remembrance Day - Thursday, November 11, 2021
  • Christmas Day - Saturday, December 25, 2021
  • Boxing Day - Sunday, December 26, 2021
Is that when we have to confess all our sins and ask Trudeau for forgiveness'?
 
Who knew?

A new public holiday has been added to the calendar

.Public holidays for 2021
  • New Year - Friday, January 1, 2021
  • Good Friday - Friday, April 2, 2021
  • Easter Monday - Monday, April 5, 2021
  • Victoria Day - Monday, May 24, 2021
  • Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day - Thursday, June 24, 2021 (Quebec only)
  • Canada Day - Thursday, July 1, 2021
  • Civic Holiday - Monday, August 2, 2021
  • Labour Day - Monday, September 6, 2021
  • National Day for Truth and Reconciliation - Thursday, September 30, 2021
  • Thanksgiving Day - Monday, October 11, 2021
  • Remembrance Day - Thursday, November 11, 2021
  • Christmas Day - Saturday, December 25, 2021
  • Boxing Day - Sunday, December 26, 2021
Is that when we have to confess all our sins and ask Trudeau for forgiveness'?
I have been trying not to bite through my tongue since l first heard about it, but my patience is just about done and the time to have the label racist applied to me is approaching sooner rather than later....
 
Who knew?

A new public holiday has been added to the calendar

.Public holidays for 2021
  • New Year - Friday, January 1, 2021
  • Good Friday - Friday, April 2, 2021
  • Easter Monday - Monday, April 5, 2021
  • Victoria Day - Monday, May 24, 2021
  • Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day - Thursday, June 24, 2021 (Quebec only)
  • Canada Day - Thursday, July 1, 2021
  • Civic Holiday - Monday, August 2, 2021
  • Labour Day - Monday, September 6, 2021
  • National Day for Truth and Reconciliation - Thursday, September 30, 2021
  • Thanksgiving Day - Monday, October 11, 2021
  • Remembrance Day - Thursday, November 11, 2021
  • Christmas Day - Saturday, December 25, 2021
  • Boxing Day - Sunday, December 26, 2021
Is that when we have to confess all our sins and ask Trudeau for forgiveness'?
Is that an actual stat holiday, or just a day with a name attached to it? If it's a stat holiday I'd much prefer one mid way between Victoria Day and Canada Day (Dominion Day), as that's a long stretch through June in nice weather without a long weekend. The end of September I'm not so keen on, as the weather is often iffy by then and it's only a week and a half after that until Thanksgiving anyway.
 
Who knew?

A new public holiday has been added to the calendar

.Public holidays for 2021
  • New Year - Friday, January 1, 2021
  • Good Friday - Friday, April 2, 2021
  • Easter Monday - Monday, April 5, 2021
  • Victoria Day - Monday, May 24, 2021
  • Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day - Thursday, June 24, 2021 (Quebec only)
  • Canada Day - Thursday, July 1, 2021
  • Civic Holiday - Monday, August 2, 2021
  • Labour Day - Monday, September 6, 2021
  • National Day for Truth and Reconciliation - Thursday, September 30, 2021
  • Thanksgiving Day - Monday, October 11, 2021
  • Remembrance Day - Thursday, November 11, 2021
  • Christmas Day - Saturday, December 25, 2021
  • Boxing Day - Sunday, December 26, 2021
Is that when we have to confess all our sins and ask Trudeau for forgiveness'?

Will that include confession from those who are smuggling tobacco, drugs, guns, stealing vehicles and stashing them in their ghettos? I fcuking doubt it!
 
Will that include confession from those who are smuggling tobacco, drugs, guns, stealing vehicles and stashing them in their ghettos? I fcuking doubt it!
I had plans to go to the Pinery flea market this summer by Grand Brend and take photos of Ipperwash to show how well the natives have treated the former army base since it was turned over to them. I particularly like the holes they cut in the fence along hwy 21 to enable them to back their enclosed utility trailers up to the opening to sell cigarettes in ziplock bags to tourists passing through......
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Who knew?

A new public holiday has been added to the calendar

.Public holidays for 2021
  • New Year - Friday, January 1, 2021
  • Good Friday - Friday, April 2, 2021
  • Easter Monday - Monday, April 5, 2021
  • Victoria Day - Monday, May 24, 2021
  • Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day - Thursday, June 24, 2021 (Quebec only)
  • Canada Day - Thursday, July 1, 2021
  • Civic Holiday - Monday, August 2, 2021
  • Labour Day - Monday, September 6, 2021
  • National Day for Truth and Reconciliation - Thursday, September 30, 2021
  • Thanksgiving Day - Monday, October 11, 2021
  • Remembrance Day - Thursday, November 11, 2021
  • Christmas Day - Saturday, December 25, 2021
  • Boxing Day - Sunday, December 26, 2021
Is that when we have to confess all our sins and ask Trudeau for forgiveness'?
No, it's when Trudeau has to confess all his sins and ask for your forgiveness.
 
I had plans to go to the Pinery flea market this summer by Grand Brend and take photos of Ipperwash to show how well the natives have treated the former army base since it was turned over to them. I particularly like the holes they cut in the fence along hwy 21 to enable them to back their enclosed utility trailers up to the opening to sell cigarettes in ziplock bags to tourists passing through......

I see they have an Employment Ontario branch on the Ipperwash Road. I’m sure that’s a busy place.
 
Is that an actual stat holiday, or just a day with a name attached to it? If it's a stat holiday I'd much prefer one mid way between Victoria Day and Canada Day (Dominion Day), as that's a long stretch through June in nice weather without a long weekend. The end of September I'm not so keen on, as the weather is often iffy by then and it's only a week and a half after that until Thanksgiving anyway.
According to Gov.ca it's a Federal Holiday. Agree about the long stretch they could have changed the civic August 12th holiday to a stat holiday instead.

I only heard about it today because the wife saw it on her 3 month advisory work schedule.
 

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