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Left overs for the week.
 
The following post has been copied from the election thread as I thought it contains some interesting points about Canadian society which go beyond the election. I have to wonder if this "unselfconscious nationalism" is a trend that will spread beyond Quebec and replace the current "multiculturalism" orthodoxy.

The following is a rather interesting story on why the Bloc Québécois are coming back from the dead, and how this will affect the outcome of the election.
Why the Bloc Québécois came back from the dead to haunt the Liberals

All the other major parties have accused the Bloc of trying to revive vieilles chicanes, old arguments.
Throughout the campaign, as the Bloc Québécois rose steadily in the polls, the other leaders would accuse the sovereigntist party of trying to revive vieilles chicanes, old arguments.

Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer used the line in the TVA debate. The NDP's Jagmeet Singh used a slight variation. Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau has been using the line at least since 2013.
This was intended to make the party look like it was stuck in the past.
Accusing the Bloc of obsessing over old arguments was meant, of course, to make the party look like a leftover from a bygone era, when talk of referendums and sovereignty consumed the country's political oxygen.
However, it isn't the Bloc who are stuck in the past. They have focused on nationalism, not sovereignty.
But the problem is that under leader Yves-François Blanchet, the Bloc has reinvented itself.

Blanchet has spent most of his time talking about Quebec nationalism, not sovereignty.
The new provincial CAQ government in Quebec follows a form of nationalism called décomplexé, which probably best translates as "unselfconscious". The BQ have now copied this, and the other parties focusing on vieilles chicanes makes them look like the ones who are stuck in the past.
In Quebec, this brand of nationalism is often called décomplexé, that is, unselfconscious or, literally, without complexes; its champion is Premier François Legault and it's seen as something new, refreshingly so.

Recycling the vieilles chicanes line makes it seem like it's the other federal leaders who are the ones stuck in the past.
Quebecers are confident, and one of the reasons for this is their economy is doing well. Scotiabank expects Quebec's economic growth to lead the country's this year. Employment is growing, and there are signs of prosperity all around.

However, more immigration is needed to sustain this growth. What concerns Quebecers is whether these immigrants will integrate into Quebec society, including learning to speak French and adopt Quebec values.
But the long-term prospects of this growth face significant hurdles thanks to an aging population that is leaving the workforce in droves.

Economists, business lobbies and mayors are pleading for more workers, for immigrants. But these pleas confront more deeply embedded concerns: Will they speak French? Will they adopt our values?
Many Quebecers feel that Trudeau is not listening to these concerns.
The perception among many Quebecers — especially those older and living outside of Montreal — is that the Trudeau government was deaf to these concerns.
In Quebec, these concerns form the basis of a new type of nationalism, based on values and culture rather than separatism.
Quebec, in a way, is re-modernizing itself, a process that comes with anxieties about the ability of a collective identity to survive the transformation.

As have similar anxieties elsewhere in the world, in Quebec they have been channeled into nationalism. That is what the Bloc is offering voters.
I will refer back to previous posts on the "Things Canadian" thread about the CAQ and how they have led this trend in Quebec. The CAQ reject the idea of an other independence referendum, but Quebecers are to be maitre chez nous, "masters in our own house", in Quebec and immigrants are expected to conform to Quebec culture.

The effect this comeback of the Bloc Québécois will have on the election is that they are expected to take seats that the Liberals were counting on to maintain a majority. The Conservatives may lose seats to the BQ as well, but they have fewer seats in Quebec to lose so it would hurt them less provided they can pick up enough other seats in other provinces.

I will also add to the above a point which wasn't addressed in the article. The comeback of the Bloc Québécois is also a reflection of how low they had sunk in recent years. Their current leader, Yves-François Blanchet, recently replaced Mario Beaulieu. Beaulieu was a "controversial" party leader as he was seen as being a hard line separatist, forced on the party MPs by party activists in 2014. A number of their MPs, including the party house leader, quit the caucus to sit as independents.

In 2017, Mario Beaulieu was replaced by the even worse Martine Ouellet. She too faced a caucus revolt over her plans to focus on Quebec independence, a plan which party MPs feared would lose them their seats. Again, a number of party MPs quite the caucus to sit as independents. In 2018, Ouellet was forced out and replaced by the current leader, Blanchet.

I have also mentioned previously how Bernier's People's Party also seems to be taking some of his party's policies from the pages of the CAQ policy book. If he fails to do well in this election in Quebec, it may be partially due to the BQ already having staked their claim on some of the same policies at the federal level.
 
The following story is nominally about a family owned business closing after 154 years, but I thought the more interesting aspect was the connection to the early oil industry.
Family-owned business established before Confederation closes after 154 years

VanTuyl and Fairbank Heavy Hardware was a hardware store in Petrolia which closed recently. It was a family owned business which closed when the latest proprietor had no one to pass the business on to who wanted to continue to operate it.

Petrolia is a town in Ontario just west of London in southwestern Ontario (several hours drive southwest of Toronto). The nearby town of Oil Springs was the site of the first oil well in North America, and the numerous oil wells in the area provided up to 90 percent of Canada's oil up until the 1900s. That first oil well is still in production today. The hardware store's owner's great grandfather was also among the early oil field operators.
The Town of Petrolia supplied 90 per cent of Canada's oil needs up to the 1900s, and the store was founded by John Henry Fairbank, who was among the earliest people to dig an oil well in North America.

"The oil business was starting up in Petrolia and my great grandfather started a hardware store, which of course sold booze and the rest of it — I mean, it was full-on," said Charlie Fairbank, who now runs the store.

The first oil field in North America was dug in Oil Springs, Ont., about 12 kilometres from Petrolia. That was in 1858 and the well still produces oil to this day.
Oil experts from Petrolia went on to spread the technology around the world. For example the first oil well in Iran was drilled by a crew from Petrolia in 1908.
The oil fields near Petrolia produced expert workers who were sent around the world to replicate the technology.

"If you went to Poland, you would find the structure of the jerker lines that we had in Petrolia, Oil Springs and Bothwell. If you go to Iran, the first well in 1908 was drilled by a crew of six from Petrolia. You can go anywhere in the world where oil is important and somebody from Petrolia has been there," Fairbank said.
VanTuyl and Fairbank Heavy Hardware started off by supplying the oil industry, and still supplied the local oil industry as well as local farmers until they closed recently.

The Petrolia and Oil Springs oil industry is insignificant on today's scale, but they are interesting from an historical aspect.

Here's some photos, with captions and my own notes.

Fairbank Oil Field is still in production in Oil Springs, Ont

The above photo is probably the most interesting. This shows two oil wells, with a partial view in the foreground and a more complete view of one in the background. The beam rocks back and forth to operate the pump. You can see the pulley which directs the chain or cable to the row of wooden posts in the background.

Those posts support a series of wooden beams which are linked together to form a continuous chain. That chain of beams is pulled back and forth by an engine located remotely, probably in the small wooden shed in the background. Originally it would have been powered by a steam engine, but in more modern times that has been replaced by an electric motor.

In the time before electricity was available, this was the most practical means of distributing power from a steam engine to a number of dispersed locations. Water powered versions of this same technology were widely used in the medieval European mining industry. By the time electric power became available in the Petrolia and Oil Springs oil fields, the industry was already in decline there as bigger oil fields were developed elsewhere, so there wasn't any economic incentive to modernise the technology instead of just keeping what they had running.


The iconic wooden wagon on the roof of the store. It is an exact replica of a model from the Petrolia Wagon Works.


Charlie Fairbank has been building packers for the oil field for 45 years. He says each one takes 3 hours. They are used as a seal between the outside of the production tubing and the inside of the casing.

There is also a video in the story which may interest some.
 
The following story is nominally about a family owned business closing after 154 years, but I thought the more interesting aspect was the connection to the early oil industry.
Family-owned business established before Confederation closes after 154 years

VanTuyl and Fairbank Heavy Hardware was a hardware store in Petrolia which closed recently. It was a family owned business which closed when the latest proprietor had no one to pass the business on to who wanted to continue to operate it.

Petrolia is a town in Ontario just west of London in southwestern Ontario (several hours drive southwest of Toronto). The nearby town of Oil Springs was the site of the first oil well in North America, and the numerous oil wells in the area provided up to 90 percent of Canada's oil up until the 1900s. That first oil well is still in production today. The hardware store's owner's great grandfather was also among the early oil field operators.


Oil experts from Petrolia went on to spread the technology around the world. For example the first oil well in Iran was drilled by a crew from Petrolia in 1908.


VanTuyl and Fairbank Heavy Hardware started off by supplying the oil industry, and still supplied the local oil industry as well as local farmers until they closed recently.

The Petrolia and Oil Springs oil industry is insignificant on today's scale, but they are interesting from an historical aspect.

Here's some photos, with captions and my own notes.

Fairbank Oil Field is still in production in Oil Springs, Ont

The above photo is probably the most interesting. This shows two oil wells, with a partial view in the foreground and a more complete view of one in the background. The beam rocks back and forth to operate the pump. You can see the pulley which directs the chain or cable to the row of wooden posts in the background.

Those posts support a series of wooden beams which are linked together to form a continuous chain. That chain of beams is pulled back and forth by an engine located remotely, probably in the small wooden shed in the background. Originally it would have been powered by a steam engine, but in more modern times that has been replaced by an electric motor.

In the time before electricity was available, this was the most practical means of distributing power from a steam engine to a number of dispersed locations. Water powered versions of this same technology were widely used in the medieval European mining industry. By the time electric power became available in the Petrolia and Oil Springs oil fields, the industry was already in decline there as bigger oil fields were developed elsewhere, so there wasn't any economic incentive to modernise the technology instead of just keeping what they had running.


The iconic wooden wagon on the roof of the store. It is an exact replica of a model from the Petrolia Wagon Works.


Charlie Fairbank has been building packers for the oil field for 45 years. He says each one takes 3 hours. They are used as a seal between the outside of the production tubing and the inside of the casing.

There is also a video in the story which may interest some.
I’ve been that store on many occasions, one of the few true hardware stores left in this region where you can actually walk in and get what you need. Charlie first mentioned closing back in July and I asked if he was having an auction to clear out the inventory but he just smiled and said he was undecided. If an auction comes about it will be a show stopper for sure.
 
I’ve been that store on many occasions, one of the few true hardware stores left in this region where you can actually walk in and get what you need. Charlie first mentioned closing back in July and I asked if he was having an auction to clear out the inventory but he just smiled and said he was undecided. If an auction comes about it will be a show stopper for sure.
I don't know how far back his business records go, but if he has early ones then I hope they end up in a museum as they likely contain a lot of information about the early oil industry.
 
I don't know how far back his business records go, but if he has early ones then I hope they end up in a museum as they likely contain a lot of information about the early oil industry.
I am guessing the Lambton county museum group will be chomping at the bit to get ahold of the records and everything else they can get their hands on. There is tons of old signage and such in the main store and I’d hate to see how much more is storage, doesn’t seem he got rid of anything.
 
Anyone suffer damage with the storm on hallowe’en? I lucked out and didn’t get any trick or treaters, but had the good fortune of having a 70 ft pine tree fall on my house....
 
Anyone suffer damage with the storm on hallowe’en? I lucked out and didn’t get any trick or treaters, but had the good fortune of having a 70 ft pine tree fall on my house....
Lovely. My pal's son had a pine about 50' tall come crashing through his shed.

As for me, I was wishing that the wind would take away the 2 trillion maple leaves in my back yard. No luck, sadly.
 
An excellent Remembrance Day parade then service I attended in Oshawa that was put on by the Ontario Regiment (RCAC). I didn’t take photos because it didn’t feel right, but found this video. If you enjoy armour and military vehicles of different eras, skip to 4:10 unless you like shïte pipe bands.
Dredging this back up, now we're a year on, we have a few documentaries from the event.
This is the first one. Two more are out next week on other channels. I shall link them here.
 
Very Canadian attitude...

How the fcuk would you know, you’ve never been here and likely never even met a Canadian. Why don’t you head over to your gargling or should I go thread, there are many still waiting for you to ante up, or you prefer to just stay a bottom feeding pariah?
 
How the fcuk would you know, you’ve never been here and likely never even met a Canadian. Why don’t you head over to your gargling or should I go thread, there are many still waiting for you to ante up, or you prefer to just stay a bottom feeding pariah?
You really need to get that tin foil hat a bit tighter. And have a bit of a laugh.
 
You really need to get that tin foil hat a bit tighter.
No he doesn't, you just need to stop pretending to be somethings you aren't.
 

arcticfox042

War Hero
Villanova Canadian War Cemetery (Italy) tonight ... Large contingent of Canadian forces present.
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Vill-11-12-19--2.jpg
 

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